Aug 12

No More Six-Man Rotation; Mets’ Pitching In State Of Flux

That six-man rotation the New York Mets wanted to establish will not happen. With the need to protect Jon Niese, who came off the disabled list Sunday, and wanting to limit the innings of Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler, the six-man rotation seemed an appropriate way to go.

HEFNER: DL bound?

HEFNER: DL bound?

Of course, six won’t work when there are only five pitchers. That’s because struggling Jeremy Hefner was optioned to Triple-A Las Vegas to make room for Niese, and could wind up on the disabled list with an elbow problem.

Niese labored in beating the Diamondbacks Sunday, but came out feeling no pain in his shoulder. We’ll know more when he reports to Dodger Stadium later.

“I felt good,’’ Niese told reporters in Phoenix. “There was no pain. Everything felt good. … Let’s see how it feels [Monday].’’

Niese, held to a 90-pitch limit, gave up four runs in six innings. Not a quality start, but good enough to win. Niese averaged roughly 90 mph., on his fastball, which has been this season’s norm. His next start is scheduled for Aug. 16, at San Diego. The Mets have not placed a pitch count limit for that start, but it wouldn’t be a bad idea to keep him on a strict limit for the remainder of the season.

Despite the return to a five-man rotation, GM Sandy Alderson believes both Harvey and Wheeler should be able to close out the season while reaching their innings limit.

METS ROTATION FOR AUGUST: ESPN’s Adam Rubin, who is on top of all things Mets, put together their projected rotation for the remainder of the month. Here’s what Rubin came up with:

AT DODGERS

Aug. 12: Jenrry Mejia

Aug. 13: Harvey

Aug. 14: Dillon Gee

AT PADRES
Aug. 15: Wheeler

Aug. 16: Niese

Aug. 17: Mejia

Aug. 18: Harvey

AT TWINS

Aug. 19: Gee

BRAVES

Aug. 20: Wheeler

Aug. 21: Niese

OFF DAY
Aug. 22 

TIGERS

Aug. 23: Mejia

Aug. 24: Harvey

Aug. 25: Gee 

 PHILLIES

Aug. 26: Wheeler

Aug. 27: Niese

Aug. 28: Mejia

Aug. 29: Harvey

AT NATIONALS

Aug. 30: Gee

Aug. 31: Wheeler

Of course, there’s no accounting for injuries or rainouts, so the rotation could change. It doesn’t appear Rafael Montero will be brought up in September because he would be close to reaching his innings limit. However, during the crush of games for the rest of the month, it might be prudent for the Mets to bring him up for a spot start.

Where they slot him could allow for more rest for Harvey and Wheeler. Plus, it gives the Mets a look at one of their top prospects under major league conditions.

It would be a win-win situation.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 09

LaTroy Hawkins Better Closer Option Than Committee

Isn’t it always the way with the New York Mets? There’s positives brewing, but something always seems to get in the way, such as Bobby Parnell’s bulging disk.

HAWKINS: Best option for closer.

HAWKINS: Best option for closer.

Once pegged to lose 100 games, the Mets are talking about .500 and finishing in second place in the NL East, but gone is Parnell, probably for the year if surgery is required.

The Mets’ bullpen has been stellar since the beginning of July, but there’s only one real choice to replace Parnell and that would be 40-year-old LaTroy Hawkins instead of going with a bullpen-by-committee, which rarely works and usually ends up using guys outside of their customary roles.

Hawkins saved the last two games of the Colorado series, and has 90 saves in his career. Not great over 19 years, but it is the best the Mets have going for them right now.

Hawkins struggled early in the season, but has been consistently effective. He has experience pitching in tight games, and Terry Collins has more trust in him than in Scott Atchison or Scott Rice or Pedro Feliciano.

Even at 40, Hawkins was throwing in the mid-90s against the Rockies. He can still bring it when he has to, and averages 6.6 strikeouts per nine innings, and only 1.6 walks per nine innings.

Perhaps Hawkins will eventually run on fumes, but if the Mets are cognizant about not getting him up constantly, and perhaps occasionally let their set-up reliever work into the ninth if there’s a three-run lead, it could preserve him.

Collins’ bullpen has been exceptional over the past month, but now he must make a significant choice: Does he go the committee route or give his trust to Hawkins?

The thought of saving Zack Wheeler’s innings by using him in relief is not a good idea as the change in routine creates the possibility of injury. And, please, nobody mention Frank Francisco. Please.

Hawkins has pitched well and is deserving of closing until he can’t it anymore.

I don’t think there’s any doubt Hawkins has to be the closer until Parnell returns, which as of now looks to be next spring.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 04

Here’s A Plan For The Mets On How To Use Wilmer Flores

What is going on with the New York Mets and prospect Wilmer Flores? Can we even call him a prospect anymore?

His natural position is third base, but with David Wright on the disabled list they are not bringing up Flores.

FLORES: Could he play first?

FLORES: Could he play first?

It makes no sense unless the Mets have other plans for Flores. Reading between the lines, my guess is their long- range plan could be to play him at first base, which is where he recently worked at Triple-A Las Vegas following an ankle injury.

Reportedly, he’s back at second base, but why? They should play him at first for the rest of the minor league season to see if they have something there.

Flores has played all around the infield, but mostly at second base this season before the interlude at first base. Blocked from third because of Wright, and with Daniel Murphy playing better at second, and concerns about his lack of speed keeping him from the outfield, first base could be the logical conclusion.

Don’t the Mets see that?

It appears the Mets will give Davis the second half to find his way at the plate. If he doesn’t, but Flores shows something at first, their questions could be answered for them by not tendering Davis a contract and go into spring training next year with Flores competing with Josh Satin for the first base job.

Should Flores use the rest of the minor league season – and there’s not much left – to make a positive impression at first base, it will be interesting to see if the Mets send him somewhere this winter to work at that position.

The presumption is Flores can hit, evidenced by his .320 average with 14 homers and 85 RBI with Las Vegas. All that in just 412 at-bats.

Currently, Flores has little trade value, even as a prospect, because other teams also don’t know where to play him. And, American League teams prefer to use the designated hitter slot for veterans who have lost a step, or proven major league hitters stuck in a position logjam.

Flores is neither. The question is: Will he ever be a Met?

 

TODAY’S LINEUP

The following is the Mets’ lineup for their series finale with Kansas City:

Eric Young, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Josh Satin, 3B

Marlon Byrd, RF

Ike Davis, 1B

Juan Lagares, CF

John Buck, C

Omar Quintanilla, SS

Zack Wheeler, RHP

LINEUP THOUGHTS: There was speculation the Mets would move Murphy to third and play Eric Young at second, but that’s not the case and that’s a good thing. Young and Murphy are settled into their positions, and with Wright out, why make a move that impacts three positions instead of one? … I still like Lagares batting second and dropping down Murphy into a RBI slot. With the way he’s hitting he’s better in the fifth slot than Davis.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 02

Using Zack Wheeler Out Of The Bullpen Is A Bad Idea

There are bad ideas and really bad ideas, and the New York Mets considering using Zack Wheeler out of the bullpen falls into the latter category.

WHEELER: Leave him alone. (AP)

WHEELER: Leave him alone. (AP)

Wheeler has thrown a combined 114.1 minors-and-majors innings this season with a cutoff number at 180. With the intent of limiting his innings, manager Terry Collins and pitching coach Dan Warthen are mulling using Wheeler out of the bullpen.

This is a bad idea on so many levels, beginning with the up-and-down nature of a reliever. The Mets will say they will only use Wheeler at the start of an inning, but that’s no guarantee. It is still a change in routine and they must scrap this idea immediately.

The Mets’ goal of winning as many games as possible in the second half and limiting Wheeler and Matt Harvey aren’t mutually compatible. The best way to achieve their goal of making a .500 run is to not change their pitching, which has been good.

Pitchers are creatures of habit and Wheeler hasn’t pitched out of the bullpen since 2010. For the past three years, he’s worked in the routine of a starter. Bouncing from starter to reliever in the middle of a season is never a good idea. The Mets should know that by now with Jenrry Mejia, who went from reliever to starter and ended up having Tommy John surgery.

A coincidence? Perhaps, but why take the chance? Considering how the Mets handled Wheeler with kid gloves, thrusting him into a new role is counter productive. It might be different if the Mets were in a pennant race, but they are not.

Figuring ten more starts they should simply cut Wheeler at six innings a game and do not deviate under any circumstances. That would give him 174.1 innings, just under the limit. This way, it keeps Wheeler in his normal routine and eliminate the different strain on his arm caused by working in relief. A starter has a set program, but a reliever does not.

San Francisco used Tim Lincecum out of the pen last year, but he’s a veteran more capable of making the adjustment than Wheeler.

Currently, the Mets are operating with a six-man rotation, which could go back to five once Jonathan Niese comes off the disabled list. The Mets have not said they’ll continue with six when Niese returns. Doing so might not be a bad idea because it would accomplish the dual  purposes of monitoring Wheeler and Harvey, not to mention protecting Niese.

If the Mets go down to five, it would give Wheeler and Harvey additional turns. In that case, they should be skipped or pushed back a turn, which is preferable to shaving innings piecemeal..

The Mets haven’t said whether they will have an innings limit on Wheeler and Harvey next season, but if they do, they should map out their plan from the beginning than doing so mid-stream.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 01

What Zack Wheeler Brings To Mets

MLB: New York Mets at Atlanta BravesZack Wheeler proved why he has the potential to transform the New York Mets into legitimate contenders this week after a sterling pitching performance that saw him take a no-hitter into the seventh inning against the Marlins.

The 23-year-old has flashed much of the raw ability and plus offerings that have made him one of the top right-handed pitching prospects in the game three years running.

As the Mets move closer to becoming a perennial contender built on a foundation of formidable starting pitching, MLB betting fans look to operators like casino tropez online to find the betting odds for the Mets improving much as their fortunes are.

Wheeler is still trying to find consistency within his delivery, but continues to work with pitching coach Dan Warthen after every start as he strives to refine his delivery.

“I just have to figure out my motion,” Wheeler said. “It’s about finding a motion that works for me.”

The key for the young righty will be consistency, and in his last start he delivered perhaps his best and most dominating performance since his promotion. He continues to evolve and as he gets better, so do the betting odds for the Mets.

The Mets can already see the bright futures that await Wheeler and his teammate and ace pitcher Matt Harvey. The two of them have invoked memories of past Mets 1-2 punches like Seaver and Koosman and Gooden and Darling.

The scouts and talent evaluators all agree that the Mets are on the verge of something special. To that end the Mets will play it safe and ensure that they do not overwork their prized young pitchers.

Both of them will have less than ten starts left to the season and their innings pitched will be monitored closely.

They will be protecting their investment by going to a six-man rotation, even if it means playing with a short bench. It’s a risk worth taking and the rewards could come as soon as the 2014 season.