Mar 15

Do Mets Have Guts To Leave Harvey Off Opening Day Roster?

The question must be posed: Does the Mets’ top brass have the stones to leave Matt Harvey off the Opening Day roster?  While it is clear Jacob deGrom is ready for the start of the season, it is also painfully obvious Harvey is not.

HARVEY: Not ready. (AP)

HARVEY: Not ready. (AP)

While exhibition numbers aren’t important, after Harvey was pasted once again today by the Marlins, it is hard to ignore his 0-3 record and 7.88 ERA. That high an ERA is hard to dismiss any time of the year.

Harvey broke into our consciousness in 2012 with near pinpoint control, supreme confidence and a fastball that regularly clocked in the high 90s. Today, an elbow and shoulder surgery later, his confidence as battered as his body, and a fastball in the low 90s, Harvey isn’t close to being the stud pitcher and cartoon superhero character Mets’ fans yearn to see again.

Earlier this spring Harvey said he had no doubt his velocity would return. He was far less optimistic today; he appeared to concede to a new chapter in his career.

“I’m not looking to throw 100 mph., again or 97 even,” Harvey told reporters. “My job is to get people out no matter what I’m throwing, and I’m looking forward to it. [The velocity] is going to be there.”

But, what will it be?

Pitching coach Dan Warthen said the Mets won’t know about Harvey’s physical abilities for several months, claiming he’s guessing May.

“History says with [thorasic surgery] it’s 10 months out,” Warthen said. “That’s when you really start to feel strong. Generally, when you open a season you gain two miles per hour. If he’s playing at 94, 95, it’s a completely different story.”

But, Harvey’s throwing 92 these days at best, which means he basically must reinvent himself, which will be hard to do with another three exhibition starts remaining.

That brings us back to the original question as to whether the Mets if Harvey doesn’t immediately turn it around, would leave him back to get stronger and work on his mechanics. Considering their potential depth with Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman – and possibly Zack Wheeler – that would be the prudent option.

The Mets are blessed to have the depth most teams don’t possess, so why not take advantage of it? Assuming Harvey isn’t ready in three three weeks – and that’s what Warthen is saying – it would be better to utilize that depth in April to get him ready rather that use it later if he breaks down.

Harvey won’t like it, but that’s not important. Getting him ready is.

Mar 10

Mets Get Positive Showings From Harvey And Wheeler

Optimistic was the word of the day for the Mets regarding pitchers Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler. Despite losing both of their split-squad games Friday, the Mets had to be encouraged from what they got from Harvey and Wheeler, both of whom are recovering from surgery.

HARVEY: Another positive step. (Getty)

HARVEY: Another positive step. (Getty)

Hit in his first start, Harvey gave up only one run in their 7-6 loss to Houston. In their other game, Wheeler, who hasn’t pitched in nearly two years, gave up a run in two innings in the Mets’ 5-2 loss to the Braves.

Harvey topped out at 92 mph., but insisted he’ll reach the upper 90s before the end of spring training.

“Definitely an improvement from the first one,” Harvey, who pitched with a stiff neck, told reporters. “I think it’s just a matter of time before things click and mechanics click, timing clicks. But I think overall it was definitely a plus. … It’s nice to go up there and throw 97 to 100 mph. or whatnot, but you need to figure out how to pitch. It’s been awhile since I’ve been in a competition like that, so for me, I think it’s a matter of time.”

Velocity isn’t the issue for Harvey. It is command and movement on his pitches. It is also working in his slider and change-up, which he did today.

Harvey is approaching his recovery with the right mindset. Eventually, he’ll throw harder, but he’s right in saying there’s time and the most important thing is to get back to pitching.

Harvey is currently slotted third or fourth in the rotation, but Wheeler will likely open the season in an extended spring training. That is the presumption considering he’s on an innings limit of 110.

Wheeler, who underwent Tommy John surgery in March of 2015, had a simple objective.

“As long as I came out of this healthy today, that was my No. 1 goal,” Wheeler told reporters. “I’ve been going through this for two years now, so whatever happened, happened. I got a strikeout and gave up a home run. All of that really doesn’t matter right now. I’m just glad I’m healthy right now.”

Mar 09

DeGrom Continues To Be Sharp

The early returns have been good for Jacob deGrom, who threw four shutout innings in today’s 5-5 tie with Detroit.

Coming off surgery on his elbow, deGrom has thrown six scoreless and walk-free innings in his two spring training starts. He’s clocked in the mid-90s and struck out seven.

DEGROM: Has reason to smile. (AP)

DEGROM: Has reason to smile. (AP)

Results aren’t important, at least not yet, this early in spring training. What’s most important at this stage, especially after surgery, is fastball command and deGrom has been sharp.

“I was really pleased with being able to locate all four pitches today,” deGrom told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “I think today I was able to throw that changeup where I wanted, pretty much when I wanted to.”

Of the Mets’ rotation, deGrom has been the sharpest, followed by Noah Syndergaard – but his pitch count has been high – and Steven Matz. Matt Harvey has been roughed up and Zack Wheeler starts for the first time Friday.

While deGrom has been solid in his six innings, the early returns have been mixed overall. It’s premature to say the rotation is completely healthy and ready to go, but there’s reason to be optimistic.


Feb 25

Not Expecting Wright Or Wheeler For Opening Day

Although it is early, don’t expect either David Wright or Zack Wheeler to be ready by Opening Day. Frankly, there is no reason to be concerned with either starting the season in the minor leagues.

For the next two to three weeks, Wright will play as a designated hitter, because he’s that far from being able to throw. And, Wright isn’t fast enough to run the ball across the infield. This should also limit talk about moving to first base because he has to throw from that position, also.

It’s not alarming now because it is a long spring training and the Mets have depth at third with Jose Reyes, Wilmer Flores and even Neil Walker, if pressed. It is better to have Wright later rather than risk additional injury and be without him longer.

As for Wheeler, he had elbow tenderness but has thrown two strong bullpen sessions since. The Mets currently see him as the fifth starter rather than a bullpen arm, which is fine as long as they stick with that plan.

The Mets also have Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman as fifth starter candidates, so if Wheeler isn’t ready until May or June, so be it.

Spring training is to get ready for a long, grueling season, but there’s written in stone all players must be ready for Opening Day.


Feb 22

Good News So Far On Wheeler

The Mets received more good news Wednesday on Zack Wheeler‘s tender elbow. Wheeler made his second straight pain-free mound appearance this afternoon since reporting soreness in his elbow. Manager Terry Collins said Wheeler even added throwing breaking balls, which is progress.

WHEELER: Positive news so far. (Getty)

WHEELER: Positive news so far. (Getty)

Collins told reporters it was, “a big step forward … the best I’ve seen him throw down here.  The ball came out really well today. Little effort. I’m really excited.”

Rightfully so, the Mets made no proclamations with Wheeler’s future role. Starter or reliever? Well, that remains to be seen, but the most important issue is getting him healthy and there’s no rush in assigning him a role.

The Mets decided not to be in the first group of starters when exhibition play starts Friday against the Red Sox in Fort Myers. It is estimated he could make his first appearance – usually two innings or 30 pitches, March 7.

Assuming he adds an inning every five days, he should be up to seven by the end of spring training, which is normal for a starter.

However, they’ll also be simultaneously stretching out Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman, which could give them three options for the fifth starter. What I don’t want to see happen with Wheeler is to bounce him from the rotation to the pen and back again.