Dec 04

It’s Official: Mets Announce Cano, Diaz Deal

VAN WAGENEN with CANO and DIAZ and WILPON

VAN WAGENEN with CANO and DIAZ and WILPON

Brodie Van Wagenen had his picture taken today with Robinson Cano. Also in the photo was reliever Edwin Diaz, the centerpiece to the deal and COO Jeff Wilpon, who will pick up the balance of Cano’s $120 million contract.

On the surface, I am against this trade because of the money owed Cano and his 36 years. That’s just two reasons. The reason to like the deal is in the interest of fairness and for what Van Wagenen said.

”This trade should be a signal to our players and to our fans that words alone will not define this franchise,’’ Van Wagenen said. ”We did not make this move to have this be the last move. We have talent already on the roster. We want to bolster the team, improve our production next season and add more players around this. That’s our mission.”

Going to Seattle are prospects Jared Kelenic and Justin Dunn, and Jay Bruce, Anthony Swarzak and Gerson Bautista.

You could look at this as two trades. The first is the prospects for Diaz, which I’d do, but the Mariners wouldn’t bite on that without the Mets taking on Cano and his contract.

Cano is owed $24 million a year for the next five, and taking on Bruce and Swarzak will make the first year a wash. But that doesn’t change the fact there are four years left the Mets will be paying $96 million for an aging second baseman – a position where they don’t have an immediate need.

Plenty of holes remain, and with them, substantial rumors, such as trading for Cleveland’s Corey Kluber, but it might cost them either Michael Conforto or Brandon Nimmo. Then there are the on-again, off-again rumors of trading Noah Syndergaard.

Syndergaard is staying, and that was cemented with the Cano deal. As far as trading either Nimmo or Conforto, I don’t want to part with either, but I would have to in order to get Kluber.

Kluber, Jacob deGrom and Syndergaard would give the Mets one of the best staffs in the majors, and enable them to trade either Zack Wheeler or Steven Matz to fill their remaining holes of a catcher, first baseman, center fielder and at least four arms in the bullpen.

Now, if Van Wagenen can do that, then maybe he will make that big splash after all and do what few expected, which is change the culture.

I still don’t like getting Cano, who is at the tail end of his career, which was punctuated by a PED suspension and a reputation of being disinterested and a lack of hustle.

It takes years to evaluate a trade and on the surface, the Mets gave away too much for the promise of Diaz, because, after all, there’s a glut of relievers on the market, and maybe Cano has a spark left.

However, if Van Wagenen is true to his word, then there’s no telling how far the Mets will go.

 

Sep 17

As Season Winds Down, Mets Should Consider Cutting Back On Pitchers

Jacob deGrom is competing for the Cy Young Award, so the Mets won’t limit him during his final two starts. However, they might ease up on the gas when it comes to the rest of their rotation.

However, Noah Syndergaard, Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz – all of whom have been injured – could benefit if their innings are reduced.

“We have to do everything can to make sure a June doesn’t happen again,” manager Mickey Callaway said of the Mets winning only five games in June. “Because it derails your whole season.”

Syndergaard has thrown 135.1 innings; Matz has thrown a career-high 140 innings; and with seven innings tonight in Philadelphia, Wheeler has logged 182.1 innings this season.

Wheeler, 12-7 with a 3.31 ERA and 1.12 WHIP, leads the majors with eight victories in the second half.

“He’s obviously had a great season, is in a very good spot health-wise right now, and we’re going to pay attention to him probably the most,” Callaway said.

That’s because Wheeler has had an extensive injury history, with Tommy John surgery keeping him out of the majors in 2015-16, and a stress reaction ending his 2017 season in July.

Wheeler needed to prove two things this season, 1) that he could stay healthy, and 2) that he could pitch up to his expectations. He’s done both, and with nothing else left to prove, it wouldn’t hurt for him to be shut down, or at least throw a minimum of five innings.

 

 

Aug 20

The Mets Put Smith It Position To Make Error

Zack Wheeler now knows what Jacob deGrom has felt like most of this season with the Mets wasting another one of his solid starts and coming away with a no-decision. Wheeler has been one of the Mets’ bright spot in this dark season and watched his team lose, 2-1, in 13 innings to the San Francisco Giants, Monday at Citi Field.

I GOT IT, YOU TAKE IT. (AP)

I GOT IT, YOU TAKE IT. (AP)

The Mets were beaten because two pop-ups fell in against the shift in the seventh, and Dominic Smith – playing left field – collided with Amed Rosario for a run-producing error.

“It’s frustrating when you make your pitch and there’s no result,’’ Wheeler said. “We should have had somebody there.’’

Wheeler said the shift gives and takes away, “and it’s part of the game.’’

What shouldn’t be part of the game is to have a first baseman play left field. That has the disaster written all over it. Manager Mickey Callaway threw Smith under the bus and put most of the blame on Smith.

“It’s inexperience,’’ Callaway said. “He hasn’t done this a lot. He has a learning curve he has to go through. That’s an easy play for our team and we messed it up. We cost ourselves the game tonight with fundamental stuff.’’

Smith played deep on the play and called for the ball late.

“I called it way too late,’’ Smith said. “That’s on me.’’

No, it’s on the Mets, who played Smith in left field, instead of his natural first base. Seriously, don’t the Mets already know all they need to know about Wilmer Flores, who is not their first baseman of the future?

The Mets have been telling us Smith is their first baseman of the future, and with the season long since over, he should be getting at-bats at the position. This is mismanagement at its highest.

Aug 13

Mets Could Explore Six-Man Rotation

The idea of the Mets going to a six-man rotation has been brought up before and again is an issue. But, everybody needs to be in on it. Using Jacob deGrom on his normal rest so he can squeeze in a couple more starts to boost his chances to win a Cy Young Award.

DeGrom deserves the chance considering how well he’s pitched, but if the Mets are serious about this they have to do it the right way: Pick your six pitchers and stick with them.

The worst thing about a six-man rotation is it would mean less starts each for deGrom and Noah Syndergaard. That would also mean fewer innings pitched, which theoretically would keep them fresher for longer. Currently, the target number of starts is 34; it would mean 27 starts in a six-man rotation.

A rotation of deGrom, Syndergaard, Steven Matz, Zack Wheeler, Corey Oswalt and Jason Vargas would include two left-handers to keep things balanced. Ideally, I would separate deGrom and Syndergaard as to give more balance in the rotation regarding innings eaters to avoid taxing the bullpen.

“We want to see [Oswalt] pitch Saturday and then sit down and really see exactly what we want to do with all of our players after that,” manager Mickey Callaway said. “Especially since we want to monitor guys like [Noah] Syndergaard and Wheeler, a six-man rotation might make sense at some point.”

Callaway is thinking about keeping his pitchers fresh for this season, but what about next season?

The game is always evolving, and with the investment teams have with these pitchers a six-man rotation could be invaluable in keeping them healthy. For this to really work, the pitchers have to be told at the end of the season that is the plan for 2019 and give them a chance to buy in.

It then has to be implemented in spring training with no deviation.

Of course, for this to work they have to pitch well.

Jun 19

Alderson In No-Win Situation

Jacob deGrom isn’t my all-time favorite Met, but he’s close. I don’t want the Mets to trade him, but if GM Sandy Alderson pulls the trigger on a deal, I would understand the reasoning. I just don’t have faith he’d get it right. I don’t have faith he’d get it right with Noah Syndergaard, either.

ALDERSON: In no win situation. (AP)

ALDERSON: In no-win situation. (AP)

There’s no doubt the Mets could get something substantial for either one, but just how much? Both are highly regarded, but to put either one – or both – on the block is sending a signal the Mets won’t be competitive for at least four years.

The Mets are an old team, and by that time it is likely Yoenis Cespedes, Jay Bruce, Todd Frazier, Jeurys Familia, Asdrubal Cabrera, Jose Reyes and probably the bullpen would be gone. Under the Alderson regime, the bullpen turns over nearly every year.

And although Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz have pitched well over the path month, that’s such a small sample size to assume they become certified aces over the next four years.

The present roster has only two prospects – Michael Conforto and Brandon Nimmo – I’m confident will pan out. I don’t include Amed Rosario, but there’s always hope.

Given that, if Alderson keeps both deGrom and Syndergaard, there’s little to believe the Mets will have the necessary pieces to build a contender. With their history, it’s safe to believe they will not do any significant spending, and their farm system is barren, so they won’t build that way, either.

The last three games, including deGrom’s gem last night, have been fun to watch, but it’s not enough to think they’ve turned the corner, as even the 1962 Mets won three in a row.

So, whether or not deGrom is traded, will it even matter?