Sep 28

Where Would Mets Be Without Lugo?

With four precious games remaining in their season, the Mets hold a slim lead over the Giants and Cardinals in the wild-card race.

Here’s a question: Where would the Mets be without Seth Lugo?

Here’s another: Assuming Noah Syndergaard starts Sunday in Philadelphia, who would likely start the wild-card game?

Yup, it would be Lugo.

Lugo took a no-decision in his last two starts, but won his previous four. For the record, the Mets won all six of those games. Care to guess where the Mets might be without that string?

Make no mistake, the Mets are still kicking because of Lugo and Robert Gsellman, who have combined for seven overall victories.

It’s not as if they started the season in the rotation and had time to grow into their jobs, but they stepped into the breach immediately and won at a time the Mets were fighting to save their season. They didn’t make Mets’ fans forget Matt Harvey and Jacob deGrom, Steven Matz and Syndergaard, and let’s not ignore Zack Wheeler.

What they did was reduce the sting from their losses and provided a glimpse of optimism for the future. With all but Syndergaard – for now – recovering from surgery that’s comforting.

“The thing that’s been most impressive with these two young guys [is] make no mistake, they know whose shoes they’re filling,” manager Terry Collins said. “But when they come up here, they have not been intimidated by anything. All they’ve done is gone out and pitch their game, and their stuff is good, and we’re seeing it play here. You’ve got to give a little credit to the character of those guys, because they could have been really intimated.”

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Sep 27

Matz Done For Year; What Took So Long?

It wasn’t too long ago the Mets boasted having the best young staff in the sport, one that would return them to the World Series. With the postseason a week away – with no assurances of them getting there – four of the five are done for the season because of surgery.

MATZ:  To have surgery. (AP)

   MATZ: To have surgery. (AP)

ESPN’s Adam Rubin reported today – later confirmed by several media outlets – Steven Matz will be shut down for the remainder of the season to undergo surgery almost immediately on a bone spur in his left elbow. Matz is also down with an impingement in his shoulder, but surgery is not planned for that injury.

What took Matz so long to elect to have surgery? The 25-year-old Matz has had the spur for much of the season, with GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins insisting it was a “pain tolerance issue” and he couldn’t risk further injury.

However, it hasn’t been addressed whether the shoulder impingement irritating the rotator cuff was caused by an altering of Matz’s mechanics caused by the pain in his elbow. It’s worth exploring, especially considering the Mets’ history of handling injuries.

Matz hasn’t pitched since mid-August. Surgery should have been performed then, and possibly on his shoulder, also, to give him the maximum time for recovery and rehab. The current timetable is a three-month recovery period, which means he won’t pick up a ball until January.

Will he really have enough time? Had this been done a month or two ago, there wouldn’t be any doubt.

I would have thought with Matt Harvey out for the year (to remove a rib and alleviate thoracic outlet syndrome) and Zack Wheeler (ulnar nerve in elbow) that to hedge their bets they would have encouraged Matz to have the surgery weeks ago – at least when the shoulder issue surfaced. Instead, the last six weeks have been squandered.

Making this even more disturbing is Jacob deGrom had surgery last week to repair the ulnar nerve in his elbow. Also, Noah Syndergaard has been bothered by an elbow bone spur issue for several months. The Mets are saying surgery isn’t planned for him, but wouldn’t they want to get it addressed sooner than later?

With the others easing their way back next spring, the last thing the Mets would want is surgery for Syndergaard.

Fortunately for the Mets, they remain in the race because of Bartolo Colon, who has been pitching with a foot injury (he left Monday’s game after 2.1 innings), and the Band-Aid of Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman.

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Sep 22

Matz To Miss Friday’s Start; Should Have Surgery Sooner Than Later

I have more a feeling of relief than anything else with today’s news Steven Matz will be scratched from Friday’s start with persistence soreness in his left shoulder.

Good, not because Matz is still hurting. But good in the sense he won’t be pushed any longer, and in the best-case scenario, he can now be shut down and have the surgery on his elbow to treat a bone spur, and if possible, treatment on his shoulder which currently has him on the disabled list with an impingement.

MATZ:  Out for Friday. (AP)

MATZ: Out for Friday. (AP)

“It’s a shoulder, so it will be a few days to quiet down,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “It’s a process. Long toss, bullpen, maybe BP. That’s lot things to do in a short time.’’

So, even if Matz did come back, he wouldn’t be stretched out and would be used out of the bullpen, which presents a different set of questions.

Matz threw a bullpen last weekend, and had a 20-pitch session Wednesday. The Mets hoped he could start Friday against the Phillies, limiting him to 50 pitches and have Gabriel Ynoa follow him. Ynoa will now get the start.

Matz described the feeling in his shoulder as pain that differed normal soreness.

“Right now, I’m experiencing symptoms and go from there,’’ Matz said. “Sitting on the sidelines and not doing anything is not where I want to be.’’

Bringing back Matz was an ambitious idea, but smacked of desperation and similar to their handling of Jacob deGrom it might have been pushing the envelope too hard, too soon.

However, deGrom’s issue was to his elbow, but shoulders are believed to be more complex. Matz has both.

Of the Mets’ vaunted young rotation, Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, deGrom and now Matz will have surgery. And, it is possible Noah Syndergaard could have a procedure on a bone spur.

Since Matz was to have surgery this winter, it should be done as soon as possible to give him more rehab time.

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Sep 16

Met On The Mound: Colon Keeps On Going

Bartolo Colon, 43, was supposed to be in the Mets’ bullpen by early July, replaced by the much younger and harder throwing Zack Wheeler. However, for the third straight season Colon, who’ll start tonight against Minnesota at Citi Field, will exceed expectations.

COLON: Tonight's starter. (FOX Sports)

COLON: Tonight’s starter. (FOX Sports)

At 13-7 with a 3.27 ERA Colon is tied with Noah Syndergaard for the team lead in victories. Colon has registered a quality start (three runs in six innings) in seven of his last eight starts, and has 17 overall.

The greatest ability is dependability, and for the $7.25 million the Mets are playing Colon this season, already he has worked at least six innings 18 times and has given up three runs or less 24 times.

In his last start, Sept. 10, at Atlanta, Colon gave up three runs on four hits and one walk and didn’t have a decision.

After tonight, Colon’s spot in the rotation is scheduled to come up three more times, including the last game of the year, Oct. 2, at Philadelphia.

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Sep 06

The Mets Should Explore Six-Man Rotation For 2017

This won’t be a popular suggestion with the Mets’ starters, but with everybody in the rotation having been shelved at one time or another with an injury – save Bartolo Colon – perhaps it might be time to consider a six-man rotation for 2017.

HARVEY: Maybe he could stay healthy in 6-man rotation. (Getty)

HARVEY: Maybe he could stay healthy in 6-man rotation. (Getty)

None of the young bucks want this, and understandably so because they’ve been raised on the five-man rotation. Change is difficult, but then again one time there was a four-man rotation. This suggestion is prompted by Rafael Montero replacing Jacob deGrom today in Cincinnati, coupled with the report the latter might miss multiple starts.

It also coincides with solid outings from Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman.

Matt Harvey is done for the year. So is Zack Wheeler, and nobody knows when he’ll pitch again. After all, it’s been two years now. Steven Matz, sidelined with a bone spur and an impingement in his shoulder, will try to throw in Port St. Lucie today, but his return status is basically a hope.

Noah Syndergaard has also been pitching with a bone spur. Matz’s bone spur will require surgery, but it isn’t known what will happen with Syndergaard.

Meanwhile, deGrom missed time early with a strained lat muscle. His velocity has dipped and after three horrible starts, he has gone from manager Terry Collins not knowing he motioned for the trainer to deGrom saying, “I’m fine,” to missing today’s game, to nobody knows.

The Mets’ rotation for the ages won’t happen this year.

Several weeks ago I wrote how the Mets should re-evaluate the handling of their pitchers. I’m calling for it again, but adding the suggestion they go to a six-man rotation.

Years ago pitchers just pitched. But, the times were different. The salaries have skyrocketed, so there’s a greater need to protect these guys. That’s a partial explanation for why the DL is used so often. What has also changed is pitchers used to throw a fastball, curveball and change-up. Today, there are sliders, sinkers, cut fastballs, all which put strain on the arm.

There’s plenty to share responsibility for Harvey being lost twice, including the player, who wasn’t always upfront. I admire his grit, but we don’t need any heroes. I don’t know if he’ll ever learn, so this might protect him for his own good.

A six-man rotation could save the starters at least a game a month, which is a savings of roughly six starts a year, or as many a 36 innings. Injuries can occur any time despite the greatest precautions, but this could improve the odds or staying healthy.

There will be the natural attrition, such as free agency, trades and injury. Colon might eventually retire. But, if the idea is to keep these guys healthy and pitching, a first step could be reducing the workload.

Some team was the pioneer going from a four-man to a five-man rotation. The Mets have the depth other teams don’t, so why can’t they be the pioneer going to six?

To make this work, it must be installed in spring training with a defined rotation. There can be no deviation, as it will throw off the rest.

If it keeps them off the disabled list, then why not? It’s better than what’s happening now.

ON DECK: Looking at tonight’s starter, Montero.

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