Feb 04

Alderson Hints Cespedes Deal Could Lead To Bigger Things

Mets GM Sandy Alderson hinted at Wednesday’s press conference that the Yoenis Cespedes deal indicates a change in philosophy for the organization.

Let’s hope so. Long accused of running things on the cheap, Alderson said the $75-million contract should change that perception.

”Sometimes we have a habit – we do in an organization and fans as well – of thinking about the guys we have now, but thinking more about when we’re going to lose them than enjoying the moment,” Alderson said. ”That moment hopefully lasts two, three, four, five years. But I think maybe if the Cespedes signing says anything, is that there are no possibilities that will be dismissed out of hand strictly for financial reasons.”

In particular, let’s hope that will apply to signing their young pitching to long-term contracts. The popular sentiment is the Mets can’t keep them all, referring to Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, Matt Harvey, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler.

Maybe not, but the can try to keep them for as long as possible.

”When you’re talking about long-term deals with younger players, there needs to be sort of a mutual interest in doing so,” Alderson said. ”And typically we find out about that mutual interest a little bit later, closer to spring training or even in spring training. So, we’ll just see if that happens.”

Harvey, signed for $4.325 million, will be 27 in March and a free agent after the 2018 season. His agent is Scott Boras, whose reputation is to test the market and not leave money on the table. He’ll be the first test.

Then there is deGrom, (28 in June) who will be arbitration eligible next year and a free agent following the 2020 season. Syndergaard (24 in August) and Matz (25 in May) could become free agents after the 2021 season. Wheeler (26 in May) could become a free agent following the 2019 season.

Money will be coming off the books when the contracts for David Wright, Cespedes and Curtis Granderson expire, but the don’t the Mets have to replace those players as well?

The market for pitching doesn’t seem to show a ceiling, but if the Mets’ core perform to their potential, they’ll test it.

Jan 26

Mets Matters: Big Boy Payroll

The Mets’ deal with Yoenis Cespedes ($27.5 million in 2016) will put their payroll at a reported $138.8 million for this summer. It’s the organization’s highest since the days of Omar Minaya’s days as general manager.

mets-matters logoThe Mets still have unsettled arbitration cases with second baseman Neil Walker and closer Jeurys Familia.

As for Cespedes, his contract should become official after his physical today.

The following are the Mets’ contracts for 2016 (per ESPN):

Cespedes, $27.5 M.

David Wright, $20 M.

Walker, $10.6 M (midpoint of arbitration figures).

Asdrubal Cabrera, $8.25 M.

Bartolo Colon, $7.25 M.

Lucas Duda, $6.725 M.

Alejandro De Aza, $5.75 M.

Antonio Bastardo, $5.375 M.

Addison Reed, $5.3 M.

Matt Harvey, $4.325 M.

Familia, $4.05 M (midpoint of arbitration figures).

Jerry Blevins, $4 M.

Ruben Tejada, $3 M.

Juan Lagares, $2.5 M.

Jenrry Mejia, $960.556 K.

Josh Edgin, $625 K.

Travis d’Arnaud, $600 K.

Kevin Plawecki, $600 K.

Wilmer Flores, $600 K.

Michael Conforto, $600 K.

Jacob deGrom, $600 K.

Noah Syndergaard, $600 K.

Steven Matz, $600 K.

Zack Wheeler, $600 K.

Erik Goeddel, $600 K.

Hansel Robles, $600 K.

Sean Gilmartin, $600 K.

FLORES HAS ANOTHER ROLE:  In addition to backing up Wright at third, Walker at second and Asdrubal at shortstop, he’ll also do the same for Duda at first base although he has never played the position before on the major league level.

Michael Cuddyer had the role last year. Plawecki has limited experience at first in the minors.

ROBLES HEARING NOT SET:  Robles’ appeal for a three-game suspension levied for a quick pitch thrown at the head of Philadelphia’s Cameron Rupp, Sept. 30, is expected to be heard during spring training.

In addition, Chase Utley‘s two-game suspension for his late slide that broke Tejada’s right leg, has also not been heard.

 

 

Dec 17

Bringing Back Colon No-Brainer For Mets

The Mets had a handful of decisions to make this off-season, and bringing back Bartolo Colon was no-brainer. Sure, he’s 42, but he also won 14 games, made 31 starts and pitched strong in the playoffs. He won’t make 30 starts in 2016, but even so it is worth it to give him $7.25 million for next year.

The money is worth it for a lot of reasons:

COLON: Worth it. (AP)

COLON: Worth it. (AP)

* He’ll be a reliable stop-gap as the fifth starter to replace Jon Niese until Zack Wheeler is brought up in late June or July. And, if for some reason Wheeler’s return is delayed Colon can always go back into the relation.

* Colon’s work in the bullpen in the playoffs proved valuable and gives the Mets a reliable option as a long reliever.

* Colon is an invaluable asset of information to the Mets’ young core of starters. Even Jacob deGrom, Steven Matz, Noah Syndergaard and even Matt Harvey can learn from him.

* And finally, if he does well until Wheeler comes back, he might be attractive to a contender at the trade deadline. You never know.

The $7.25 million the Mets will give him will be a bargain if he gives him a year they are hoping for.

 

Dec 12

Mets Have Options For Fifth Starter

The Mets have numerous options to replace Jon Niese as fifth starter, which is another reason why trading him isn’t such a loss. Since a .500 record is considered the bar for a successful fifth starter, Niese’s 9-10 record shouldn’t be too difficult to make up.

COLON: Want him back. (Getty)

COLON: Want him back. (Getty)

And, the most important thing to remember is the Mets will need a fifth starter until Zack Wheeler comes off the disabled list, probably in July.

Their first choice should be bringing back Bartolo Colon, who won 14 games and worked 194.2 innings at age 42.

Colon proved he could work out of the bullpen during the playoffs, which is what his role would be after Wheeler returns. Colon made $10 million last year, but I doubt it will take that much to bring him back.

There’s been little buzz in the market about Colon, but while he’s said he’s open to returning to the Mets, he also said he still wants to start.

Even if Colon doesn’t come back, the Mets have three other internal options, including Rafael Montero, Sean Gilmartin and Logan Verrett.

Verrett had success last year as a spot starter – remember his start in Los Angeles when he replaced Matt Harvey? – and as a Rule 5 pickup Gilmartin proved he could be effective if they lengthen his workload in spring training. However, being a left hander, and with the Mets still needing lefty help in the bullpen, I’d rather have him work in that role.

The guy the Mets really like, and as a side thought, somebody they might want to showcase for a deal at the deadline, is Montero. He’ll be a major spring training story.

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Dec 07

Niese Mets’ Best Trade Chip

While the Mets insist they aren’t actively shopping left hander Jon Niese, you can be certain they make it known to every team they speak with that he’s available.

The Mets made it clear they aren’t going to trade Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler. That leaves Niese as their lone pitching trade chip. And, with them high on Rafael Montero, that leaves Niese as the bait to obtain an outfield bat.

NIESE: Could he soon wave good bye. (AP)

NIESE: Could he soon wave good bye. (AP)

“We haven’t been actively shopping him, but other than the four guys [Harvey, deGrom, Syndergaard and Matz], we’re going to be looking for ways to improve the team,” assistant general manager John Ricco told reporters at the Winter Meetings. “If there’s a deal that involves him and makes us better, I think we would definitely consider it.”

Niese is attactive to other teams because he’s a left, throws hard, isn’t phased about pitching in big games and has a manageable contract. He’s also healthy, having made 29 starts last season. On the downside, he’s been mostly mediocre (9-10 with a 4.13 ERA last year).

He also has an unnerving knack of not being able to slam the door and minimize trouble.

Even so, when teams talk to the Mets about pitching, he’s the first name they bring up.

ON DECK: Wrapping up Mets’ first day at Winter Meetings.