Apr 14

Note To Mets Fans: Wilpons Not Selling And Stop The Roll Call

Without question, Mets fans are among the most passionate and loyal around. I know that from this blog, from talking to many of you at spring training and at the ballpark.

Their passion was on display yesterday in several forms.

The first was the billboards directed at the Wilpons telling them to sell. That passion came at the cost of $6,000, which prompted manager Terry Collins to say: “You want to spend $6,000? Go feed the homeless.’’

Not the answer you wanted, but you got his attention. That the Wilpons would not comment also tells you they were aware.

However, I assure you being aware and responding the way you want are two different things. They know their fan base is discouraged and frustrated, but they will not sell. They are weathering the storm of the Madoff scandal, and if they didn’t sell then, they won’t sell know. It won’t happen.

They have an idea of how they want to run this team, and it doesn’t include wild spending anymore. What Sandy Alderson has done the past few years is how things will go.

Now, for the other display of passion yesterday, who couldn’t notice the roll call chants from center field?

That must stop. The roll call is a Yankees tradition and yesterday was a cheap imitation. How can any self-respecting Mets fan adopt a Yankees fan tradition?

Mets fans are better than that, so please … no more roll call. Do something original. Do something Metsian. Just don’t imitate the Yankees.

Apr 09

Memo To Harvey: Quit Whining And Just Pitch

Matt Harvey is pitching today, and with this event comes the question: Is he more interested in being a New York media darling or a Mets’ star?

It seems that way..

Like everybody else, I was enamored with the possibility of what Harvey could bring to the Mets and whether he could help them become a viable franchise again.

HARVEY: On his throne. (ESPN)

HARVEY: On his throne. (ESPN)

The operative word is “help,’’ because not one player can do it by himself, which I say because Harvey seems to be separating himself from the “common folk,’’ who are his teammates.

However, he comes off as someone not interested in the collaborative effort – that he knows best – but who rather marches to his own beat. So be it when you have the track record to back it up, but he has only 12 victories in the major leagues.

He is “potential over proven commodity,’’ which makes his threat for people to judge him by his pitching and not his off-the-field life laughable.

That’s hard to do because Harvey throws his off-the-field life into our faces on a regular basis, whether it be posing nude for ESPN; arguing with the front office where to do his rehab; letting himself be photographed in public kissing models or taking them to see the Rangers; or disregarding the perception of being seen at a Yankees game to watch Derek Jeter.

That didn’t go over well with management and some of his teammates, but he doesn’t care. He also doesn’t acknowledge his own recklessness of trying to pitch through obvious pain and not reporting the discomfort in his forearm could have contributed to his elbow injury.

Apparently, making that start in the All-Star Game was more important than anything else.

Take a look at his smirk in the accompanying photograph. Who, but somebody with a huge ego would allow himself to be photographed that way?

No, we don’t see the effort behind-the-scenes of his workouts and conditioning, but we do hear about his off-the-field exploits of wanting to bed as many women as Jeter and his clubbing and drinking.

Good for him. Joe Namath, Walt Frazier and Mickey Mantle were New York media icons, but had the accomplishments to back it up. Harvey has won 12 games.

In the end, the nightlife killed Mantle and destroyed the playing careers of Darryl Strawberry and Dwight Gooden. It is also part of why the Mets didn’t bring back Jose Reyes.

However, Harvey is young and walks with the attitude “it won’t happen to me.’’

But, it can. The questions are “when’’ and “where.’’ Will it be in Queens or the Bronx as a Yankee? Crosstown, it seems, is where he really wants to be.

At least, that’s the perception, not that he wants to be a star with the Mets, who by the way, are his employers who have the right to judge him.

Sure, I’m all for honoring Harvey’s diva-like demand to judge him on his pitching. OK,  then just shut up and pitch and don’t distract us with the other stuff.

 

Apr 08

Today In Mets History: Seaver Wins Behind Kingman, Torre

On this date in 1975, backed by Dave Kingman’s first homer as a Met and Joe Torre’s RBI single, Tom Seaver out-dueled Steve Carlton to defeat Philadelphia, 2-1, on Opening Day at Shea Stadium.

SEAVER: Beats Carlton in classic.

SEAVER: Beats Carlton in classic.

Felix Milan lead off the ninth with a single to right, moved to second on a walk to John Milner and scored on Torre’s single to left.

You know about Seaver, the greatest player in franchise history and a Hall of Famer with 311 career victories, with 198 coming as a Met. He also pitched for Cincinnati (acquired in a 1977 trade from the Mets), the White Sox and Boston.

Hard to believe Tom Terrific is 70 years old.

Torre played three seasons for the Mets (1975-77) and become their manager in 1977. He played 18 years in the majors and finished with 2,324 hits and a .297 average.

Torre managed five seasons with the Mets (winning 286 games), three with Atlanta, six with the Cardinals, three with Los Angeles, and 12 with the Yankees, where his teams won 1,173 games, six pennants and four World Series titles. Those numbers with Yankees sent him into the Hall of Fame.

As for Kingman, the overall No. 1 pick with the Giants, played six years for the Mets, with whom he hit 154 of his 442 career homers. He also played for San Francisco, Oakland, the Cubs, San Diego, California Angels and Yankees before retiring after the 1986 season.

While Seaver and Torre are in Cooperstown, it would have been interesting to see if Kingman would have made it had he hit 500 home runs.

BOX SCORE

ON DECK: Previewing Jacob deGrom‘s first start.

Apr 07

Today In Mets’ History: Gooden Makes Debut

On this date in 1984, 19-year-old Dwight Gooden made his major league debut and earned a 3-2 victory over Houston. Gooden gave up a run on three hits and two walks with five strikeouts. It was his first of 17 victories that year in giving Mets’ fans a glimpse of things to come.

In 31 starts that year, he went 17-9 with a 2.60 ERA and threw 218 innings with a league-leading 276 strikeouts and 1.073 WHIP.

GOODEN: Career started on this day. (AP)

GOODEN: Career started on this day. (AP)

Gooden exploded into greatness the following season when he went 24-4 with a 1.53 ERA in amassing 276.2 innings over 35 starts, of which 16 were complete games that included eight shutouts.

For the second straight season he lead the league in strikeouts with 268 strikeouts. He would never win 20 games again or lead the league in strikeouts.

Gooden went 17-6 in 1986, the year the Mets beat Boston in the World Series, but there were also signs of upcoming trouble. He didn’t make it past the fifth inning in either of his two starts against the Red Sox in the World Series, and then was a no-show for the victory parade.

Gooden was later arrested in December of that year in Tampa, Fla., for fighting with police. Soon after, reports surfaced of substance abuse and he tested positive for cocaine during spring training. Gooden entered a rehab center, April 1, and did not make his first start until June 5, and won 15 games that season.

Gooden had several more good seasons for the Mets, but never regained his dominance.

After two positive tests for cocaine, Gooden was suspended for the 1995 season.

Gooden’s 11-year Mets’ career ended with him going 157-85. He signed with the Yankees and threw a no-hitter in 1996. He also played for Cleveland, Tampa Bay and Houston and retired after the 2000 season.

Mar 25

Mets’ Outfield Alignment Set

In somewhat of a surprise, manager Terry Collins announced today Michael Cuddyer would play left field and Curtis Granderson would be in right.

The decision is somewhat of a surprise because the presumption was Cuddyer – with 854 career games in right and just three in left – would play the position where he was most comfortable.

However, this makes sense in the respect right field is tricky in Citi Field, and Granderson handled it well.

That Cuddyer has been deaf in his left ear since he was 11 is not an issue, said Collins. Cuddyer can still see and will be able to see the dugout waving him into position.

However, it could be a concern if he and center field Juan Lagares converge on a ball.

WHEELER SURGERY: Zack Wheeler underwent successful Tommy John surgery this morning at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan.

Dr. David Altchek performed the surgery and Wheeler is expected to be out until June of 2016.

ON DECK: Who is in better position to win sooner, the Mets or Yankees?