Feb 13

Today In Mets’ History: Cone Tries Comeback

On this date in 2003, hoping to recapture the glory of his career, David Cone came out of retirement to sign a minor-league contract with the Mets. Cone compiled an 80-48 record from 1987-1992 with the Mets.

CONE: One more time. (AP)

CONE: One more time. (AP)

Cone made the team and went 1-3 with a 6.50 ERA in five games with the Mets. Cone beat the Expos in his first start, 4-0, giving up two hits in five innings, but the feel-good comeback soon fizzled as he lost his next three starts.

His last game came in relief, May 28, with two scoreless innings at Philadelphia.

Cone compiled a 194-126 record over 17 seasons. He twice won 20 games, going 20-3 with the 1988 Mets and 20-7 ten years later for the 1998 Yankees.

Cone won the Cy Young Award in a strike-shortened 1994 season with Kansas City going 16-5 with three shutouts.

Cone carved out a reputation as a big game pitcher with an 8-3 postseason record, including 2-0 in the World Series.

ON DECK: Syndergaard Is Unquestioned Ace

 

 

 

Feb 12

Mets Today: Spring Training Starts

Pitchers and catchers report to the Mets’ spring training facility in Port St. Lucie today and another season is underway.

It’s a drive-by reporting option. All they have to do is to make GM Sandy Alderson or manager Terry Collins aware they are in town.

Actually, many of them are already in camp and have been working out. So there aren’t any who have notified management they won’t report on time.

ON DECK

I would like to begin a “Today in Mets’ History” segment today. I have done this sporadically in the past and plan to have it up and running again.

Later today, I’ll also have a post on the four most pertinent issues the Mets must resolve in spring training.

THANKS TO ADAM RUBIN

One person who won’t be in Florida today is Adam Rubin, who left ESPN to take a job in public relations. I have tremendous respect for Rubin, who covered a beat better than any other reporter I ever met.

He is a tireless worker and I became a better reporter competing against him.

I’ll always remember his professionalism, driving across Florida to places like Kissimmee, Lakeland, and Fort Myers. When I moved to the Mets’ beat after covering the Yankees for eight seasons, he was the first person to call to welcome me to the beat. He introduced me to people and helped give me the lay of the land.

And, after I left the beat, he reached out to me and sent me a gift when he heard I was injured and hospitalized in 2014 to wish me well. And, when I resumed writing when I left the hospital after six months, he posted a link to my blog on a daily basis.

I’d like to thank Adam for his friendship and competition and wish him well in his new venture.

Dec 25

Merry Christmas My Friends; Say A Prayer For Mel

Greetings all. My only baseball thoughts are simple. I am saddened by the news Mel Stottlemyre, the former pitching coach for the Mets and Yankees is not doing very well, and I pray for his recovery. I got to know Mel when I covered the Yankees and he was always gracious and a gentleman.

Mel was a pitching coach for the 1986 Mets, and if it were in my power I would wish for you to enjoy another season like that one.

I hope your day was one of peace and joy.

Merry Christmas my friends.

Dec 05

Mets Vs. Nats At Winter Meetings

The Winter Meetings officially start today at the Gaylord National Harbor convention center in suburban Washington and the host Nationals are already trying to make a splash while our Mets are barely sticking their toes in the water.

imagesThe hot rumor has the Nationals in the market for both Andrew McCutchen and Chris Sale. They are also in it for reliever Mark Melancon. Rumors always swirl this time of year, but that one is a beauty.

That would obviously put Washington over the top in the NL East.

Meanwhile, the Mets’ order of business is to attempt to trade Jay Bruce or Curtis Granderson – and there are reports GM Sandy Alderson might listen to offers for Michael Conforto – and possibly convert Zack Wheeler to the bullpen.

The Wheeler item is interesting and I’ll have more on that later.

I’m not saying the Nationals will get both McCutcheon and Sale, or either of them, but clearly the Mets and Nationals aren’t shopping in the same aisle. They aren’t even shopping in the same store.

I’ll have updates on these and other items throughout the day.

For those of you who regard the Yankees as the Mets’ fiercest competition, they already made themselves better by acquiring Matt Holliday from St. Louis to fill their DH hole. It weakens the Cardinals, so that’s a good thing.

Photo credit: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Nov 29

Mets Play Cespedes Negotiations Perfectly … Get Their Man

Well, Yoenis Cespedes is coming back, which is what both he and the Mets wanted. Good for them, and Merry Christmas to both. I initially wrote the Mets would be better off spending the money earmarked for Cespedes – $110 million over four years reported today– on other areas and still believe that might be the best long-term decision.

CESPEDES: Coming back to Mets. (Getty)

CESPEDES: Coming back to Mets. (Getty)

However, when Cespedes filed for free agency a week after the World Series, I wrote if the Mets really wanted him they needed to set a deadline to prevent negotiations dragging into January. Apparently, both sides wanted this done by the Winter Meetings, which worked to the Mets’ advantage because reports of him going to Washington, the Dodgers or Yankees never developed traction.

Apparently, both sides wanted this done by the Winter Meetings, which worked to the Mets’ advantage because reports of him going to the Dodgers or Yankees never developed traction.

Perhaps Cespedes panicked when he saw there wasn’t a line at his door and he saw his big payday slipping away. Was that why he sent a text to the Mets before Thanksgiving reiterating his desire to come back? Reportedly, nobody was willing to give him the five years he wanted, but the only team to publicly state their interest was the Mets.

We can conclude Cespedes overestimated his value in the market, while Alderson judged it perfectly and applied enough pressure to make the 31-year-old outfielder blink. Good for Alderson: He had a plan and stuck with it.

After two playoff seasons, the Mets felt enough urgency to bring Cespedes back to keep their nucleus intact as much as possible. They already made moves in that direction by bringing back Lucas Duda, Neil Walker and Jose Reyes.

As far as spending the money given Cespedes elsewhere, that was an option, but in retrospect, the market for their primary needs – catcher and a closer to replace Jeurys Familia – isn’t readily available, or inexpensive.

It must also be remembered the Mets own a trade chip in Jay Bruce, so they have the opportunity to upgrade without spending big.

Sure, I have concerns, which I’ll save for later, but the Mets felt a need and they acted on it. They basically are keeping the team that reached the playoffs together, and that’s important. Instead of dabbling and adding two or three other players, they chose the path of least resistance and there’s a lot to be said for that decision.