Nov 13

Murphy Rejects Mets; Both Sides Win

As expected, Daniel Murphy rejected the Mets’ $15.8-million qualifying offer this afternoon, a decision that makes a winner out of both sides.

Here’s how the Mets are winners:

MURPHY: Now an ex-Met. (AP)

MURPHY: Now an ex-Met. (AP)

1) They will receive a compensatory draft pick, which is what they really wanted in the first place.

2) With Murphy gone, the Mets are able to pursue free-agent Ben Zobrist, who is a better player, and if unable to sign him, are free to move Wilmer Flores from shortstop to second base, where he’s stronger defensively. The Mets can also explore playing Dilson Herrera at second base if they prefer.

3) With no financial obligations to Murphy, the Mets have $15.8 million free to spend elsewhere.

4) Whatever retooling plans the Mets have, they can move on to them quickly.

Here’s how Murphy is a winner:

1) The Mets can still sign Murphy if they choose, but aren’t expected to make the effort. Doesn’t that really mean they didn’t want him in the first place?

2) Coming off a stellar postseason, Murphy is in the prime earning years of his career. Had he accepted the qualifying offer, he would have delayed free agency by one year, and taken a huge gamble that likely wouldn’t have been rewarded with a multi-year contract. He’ll likely be offered a contract the Mets wouldn’t come close to making.

3) Much has been made of Murphy’s defensive limitations, but now he’s free to sign with an American League team and be a designated hitter.

4) The Mets yanked Murphy around for years at a variety of positions and numerous times attempted to trade him. Now, he’ll be able to sign with a team that really wants him.

Where will Murphy go? The Dodgers and Yankees are two teams prominently mentioned, but Houston and the Angels are other possible suitors.

Nov 10

Cashman Playing The Game; Murphy To Yanks Makes Sense

Despite a $15.8-million security blanked in the form of a qualifying offer, second baseman Daniel Murphy is not expected to re-sign with the Mets. He has until Friday to make his decision.

Speaking to reporters at the GM meetings in Florida, Mets assistant John Ricco said.: “In making the qualifying offer, you always have to anticipate he’s going to accept. Otherwise, I don’t think we would have done it. It’s very early in the signing season. I’m sure what he and his representatives are trying to do right now is trying to get a gauge.

MURPHY: More bad luck

MURPHY: Pinstripes make sense. (AP)

“It’s hard for me to speculate whether the market is going to be there. We made the offer with the idea that we’d like to have him back. We’ll see how it plays out.”

The reported current market for Murphy includes both Los Angeles teams, Houston, and of course the Yankees.

As Ricco said it is early in the process and nobody wants to tip their hand. That explains why Yankees GM Brian Cashman downplays interest in Murphy.

“We have to offensive-profile players already at that position,” Cashman said. “So, I think if we did any changing there it would be seeing more balance on both sides of the ball.”

The Yankees’ current second base candidates are Rob refsnyder and Dustin Ackley. They are projected to be offensive-oriented players, although neither is in Murphy’s class.

Murphy-to-the-Yankees makes sense, because in that bandbox of a stadium he could hit at least 25 homers. He could also get some designated-hitter at-bats, but most of them would go to Alex Rodriguez. And, as he would with the Mets, Murphy could also back up at first and third base.

Cashman has to feign interest because he knows every agent will parade his client through the Bronx to prime the bidding pump.

Nov 06

Mets Make Qualifying Offer To Murphy

The Mets’ first order of postseason business was extending manager Terry Collins for two years, and their second step was to make Daniel Murphy to a one-year, $15.8-million qualifying offer. He has a week to respond.

As with Collins, the Murphy deal was a no-brainer for the following reasons:

MURPHY:  Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

MURPHY: Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

1) If Murphy rejects the offer the Mets would receive a compensatory draft pick from the team that signs him.

2) The Mets are currently reluctant to give Murphy the reported figure of $50 million over four years. Before going long-term with Murphy, the Mets must first figure out if his post-season power run was an aberration or a sign of things to come.

3) That question could possibly be answered this year. Keeping Murphy around for another year could also enable them to figure out David Wright’s physical status and bide time for Ruben Tejada to heal.

If those two health issues are realized, Murphy would be a capable insurance policy.

If Murphy’s power surge is not a fluke the Mets will probably have to cough up more than if they signed him to a multi-year deal now, but that’s a gamble they would have to take.

Should the Mets be willing to go long-term on Murphy, he could give them a home-team discount.

“I like it here, and I’d like to come back,’’ Murphy said after the World Series. “I feel blessed to have been a Met this long.’’

Murphy was a 13th-round round pick of the Mets in 2006.

Among the teams that might have interest in Murphy are both Los Angeles teams, San Francisco and the Yankees.

NOTEBOOK:  The team said center fielder Juan Lagares will not require surgery on his right elbow. Lagares had a breakout season in 2014 and was rewarded with a multi-year contract, but regressed this season and had difficulty throwing. … Outfielder Michael Cuddyer underwent surgery to repair a core muscle injury. He will make $12.5 million in 2016. … LH reliever Josh Smoker was added to the 40-man roster. … A published report from Washington said the Mets could be interested in outfielder Denard Span, who was not given a qualifying offer by the Nationals.

Oct 29

It’s Baby Steps Now For Mets

My headline last night was, “Mets Routed; In Huge Hole.” There’s no denying it, but a huge hole doesn’t mean they can’t climb out of it, despite the odds of 80 percent against them. That’s just a number. The Mets sent out on Twitter today that despite the 0-2 hole they are not giving up.

I wouldn’t expect it any other way from a team whose foundation this year was resiliency. Would you?

SYNDERGAARD: Needs to be great Friday. (Getty)

SYNDERGAARD: Needs to be great Friday. (Getty)

Through injuries, losing streaks, bullpen lapses and hitting slumps the Mets found their way to Game 3 of the World Series. Of course, all of you would have signed up for being in a 0-2 hole in the Series at the start of the season.

Don’t lie, of course you would.

However, the mistake is thinking of this as a 0-2 hole. The Series is tied is the message manager Terry Collins must give his team. Before the Mets can win the World Series, they must first win a game.

I don’t want to hear how Noah Syndergaard’s future is great. I don’t care how great he’ll be in 2017. I only care about him being great Friday night.

And, let’s not worry about sending an inexperienced Steven Matz out for Game 4, or whether they might move Matt Harvey up on short rest. Game 4 doesn’t exist. The only thing that matters is Game 3.

I covered arguably the greatest collapse in baseball history, the Yankees blowing a 3-and-0 lead to the 2004 Boston Red Sox. Players from that Boston team said they never looked at the hole, but only that day’s game. That was the only thing that mattered. As long as they won that day, they were fine.

That’s the attitude the Mets had in 1986, when they lost the first two games to the Red Sox – at home – yet came back to win. Of course, several things had to happen – “the ball gets by Buckner’’ – but before the miracles happened, they had to claw back into the Series. Baby steps.

The percentages say different, but remember, in 2004, NO team ever came back from down three games to win. That’s why they play the games. The beauty of sports is you never no what can happen.

The Series is not over until one team wins four games, which hasn’t happened. Can the Mets win four of five games? Damn straight they can, but before they do, they must win Friday.

That’s the only game that matters.

 

 

 

Oct 21

Mets’ Fans And Murphy Should Cherish The Moment

Daniel Murphy has no explanation why he has homered in six straight games during this incredible playoff run by the Mets. He did it again Wednesday night and was named NLCS MVP.

“If I knew, I would have done it six years ago,’’ said Murphy, whose first inclination when asked is to credit his teammates. “I can’t explain it. I’m just going to ride this.”

He’ll ride it into the Mets’ fifth World Series appearance in their history, which begins Tuesday in either Kansas City or Toronto. Nobody really cares where, just that their season will continue.

MURPHY:  Enjoying the moment. (Getty)

MURPHY: Enjoying the moment. (Getty)

I wrote the other day how much I admired Murphy’s attitude, but said it was time he he took a bow after all the static he’s taken for his defense. He deserves this moment in the sun.

With Murphy’s unconscious streak comes the inevitable talk of whether the Mets will sign him long-term or to a qualifying offer. I’ve written it also, but on second thought, what does it matter?

Eventually, I’ll write it again. And, about bringing back Yoenis Cespedes and how he hurt his left shoulder and had to leave the game last night. Or, what’s going on with David Wright’s back. And, what workload the Mets’ starters might have next season. Or, what GM Sandy Alderson will do about rebuilding his bullpen.

There are a lot of things to review about this season, including whether Terry Collins will be named manager of the year. (He should). You guys know me, you know I’ll address them. But, at least for today I don’t want to hear them. I don’t care about next season.

This is a moment to be savored, to be cherished. It is a moment that prompted somebody online to write how he wished he was five-years-old again so he can grow up to be a Mets fan. How precious is that?

“This city deserves it,” said an exuberant Wright, who trusted Alderson and Jeff Wilpon, who promised him good times were within reach.

“This organization deserves it. The players deserve this. … I can’t describe the emotions that are going through me right now.”

The offseason news can wait a few more weeks. The topics will still be there; they aren’t going anywhere.

The last time the Mets were in the World Series was 2000. Before that, it was 1986. Before that, it was 1973 and 1969. Do you sense a trend here?

Wright said this team was a combination of the 1969 Miracle Mets and 1973 Tug McGraw, “Ya Gotta Believe,” team.

When Wright went to the playoffs in 2006, he thought it would be that way every year. However, he learned how fleeting a moment this can be. As Mets followers, we understand that.

We follow the Mets because we love that team. The reasons why, don’t matter. We just do. It is in our DNA.

However, despite the Mets’ young pitching, nothing is a given. Nothing. We don’t know about the future. None of us do.

So, let’s not worry about something beyond our control. Let’s enjoy this, as this is a rare and precious time.

It could be our best time.