Apr 02

Mets Finally Bag Game

Finally. Nearly five hours after the Yankees postponed their home opener, the Mets postponed tonight’s game against the Phillies. The game will be made up as part of a single-admission doubleheader in July. Now, was that so hard?

The snow has stopped, but the temperatures will be in the 30s. That they even thought of making their players play under such conditions – and risk injury – and make their fans sit in such miserable conditions is irresponsible and reprehensible.

That the Mets would wait so long to postpone tonight’s game is emblematic of an organization that cares little for its fan base.

Tonight’s scheduled starter, Matt Harvey, will start tomorrow. Tuesday’s starter, Seth Lugo, will be skipped and Noah Syndergaard will start Wednesday.

Too bad the Mets waited so long to make the inevitable announcement. After spending the last six weeks in Florida, the Mets played games on three of the last four days. They were off Friday, so many of the players haven’t had much time to get acclimated to their new city.

Had they called the game at 9 when it was clear the game wouldn’t be played it might have given them a full day to take care of personal business. Just making their lives a little easier.

Feb 16

What Can We Expect From Harvey?

It’s not surprising Matt Harvey has been an early topic in spring training, but for once the most compelling question about him isn’t: Will it ever happen for him?

We are six years removed from 2012 when Harvey made his major league debut with Cy Young expectations. We may never see that Harvey again, and but I believe his thoughts this year are more about his contract year than it carrying the Mets.

HARVEY: What to expect from him? (AP)

            HARVEY: What to expect from him? (AP)

Ken Davidoff, the very talented baseball columnist for The Post, wrote about Harvey “just trying for a graceful exit,’’ and he couldn’t be closer to the truth.

Seriously, does anybody really believe Harvey will suddenly pitch injury free all year, win up to 17 games, and NOT leave the Mets next winter as a free agent?

I’ve always thought he’d bolt for the Yankees the first chance he got, but maybe they won’t want him. Even so, I’d be shocked if he pitched healthy and well and stayed with the Mets. It doesn’t even matter if he signs with the Yankees or not, he’s gone.

So far, the first impression of manager Mickey Callaway is a good one. I especially liked when he said: “He might never be the Dark Knight again, but the Mets don’t need that from him. … We need the best version of who Matt is today, and that person is going to be good enough.’’

Maybe it is, maybe it isn’t, but that has to be Harvey’s motivation. He must take measured steps and that begins in spring training.

Don’t rush him, just concentrate on the mechanics Callaway said he could fix. It could take time, something Harvey wasn’t given last season.

Last spring, in his comeback from thoracic outlet syndrome surgery, Harvey was clocked throwing in the mid-80s, then pitching coach Dan Warthen said not to expect from him to reach his full strength and his velocity to reach the 90s until the end of May at the earliest.

Of course, that didn’t happen because GM Sandy Alderson ignored him and had Harvey on the Opening Day roster. Since Harvey was forced to pitch earlier than he was physically able, and, broke down again.

In addition to his physical breakdowns, Harvey has been a diva and hasn’t always treated his teammates well, such as blowing off a game and being suspended.

Harvey played it smart when he said: “New year. People make mistakes.  I’m looking forward to a new season.’’

However, he unwisely didn’t address free agency and will undoubtedly be asked about it numerous times despite him saying he wouldn’t respond to the question.

Instead, he should have said, “I have thought about it. I am open to returning to the Mets [even if he isn’t, a lie is better than a no comment]. This the only time I will address it this season.’’

He did say: “I’ve got a lot left in the tank.  I’m ready to go.’’

Personally, I hope it doesn’t reach that stage. I hope it reaches the “graceful exit,’’ Davidoff wrote about, but I think I think the best thing for both sides is for Harvey to prove he’s healthy, pitches well and is traded at the deadline.

The Mets are hedging their bets on Harvey, which explains in part why they signed free-agent lefty Jason Vargas to a two-year, $16-million contract.

Vargas is 35, and the Mets gave him the extra year in preparation for Harvey leaving, whether in July or next January.

 

Feb 06

Frazier Helps Mets Four Ways

Unquestionably, the Mets are better today after reportedly agreeing to terms with third baseman Todd Frazier on a two-year, $17-million deal.

Frazier improves the Mets four ways:

  • He gives them a proven, veteran third baseman for the next two seasons.
  • He alleviates the David Wright issue. There’s no reason to think about him returning now.
  • He allows Asdrubal Cabrera to play second base, which he prefers.
  • He strengthens the bench because it enables them to concentrate on Jose Reyes in a platoon at second and third.

Frazier hit 67 homers in the last two years, but Mets manager Mickey Callaway told The Post there’s more to him than just power.

“He’s a baseball player,’’ Callaway said. “And you know what he did at the end of the season when we were preparing to play the Yankees, he made some adjustments at the plate. He stopped chasing balls.

“He stopped trying to go down there and flick that ball to left, he was laying off balls that he was going after in the past. You look at his average (.213), but that’s going to change if he continues to do what he did the last month of the season.’’

“He’s a great defender. He’s a great baserunner, too. He can really, really run the bases. Every time we’d go into town and played him, our bench coach, who controlled the running game, would come up to me and say, ‘We’ve got to make sure to keep Frazier close at first, he gets that running lead.’ He puts pressure on the other team.’’

Frazier improves the Mets, but does he make them overcome the 22 games needed to reach .500?

Hardly.

Jan 04

Imagine Being A Marlins’ Fan

If you’re a Mets fan, and the assumption is you are, then you have to be grateful to Miami, because as stagnant as Wilpon’s team has been, the Marlins simply don’t care. Derek Jeter, one of baseball’s greatest frauds, is the face for the Marlins’ latest ownership group bent on stripping whatever competitiveness is left of the franchise.

The Marlins, reeling after the death of ace Jose Fernandez, were realistically a pitcher or two of being a contender for a wild card. Two starters could have made it a possibility.

Well, after trading Dee Gordon to Seattle, and Giancarlo Stanton the Yankees for a song, and then Marcell Ozuna to the Cardinals for a whistle, the Marlins can be regarded possibly as worse than the Mets.

That would be assured if Jeter is successful in trading outfielder Christian Yelich, catcher J.T. Realmuto and infielder Martin Prado. Compounding matters for the Mets is the contenders to land these players are the Nationals, Braves and Phillies.

Reportedly, Jeter told MLB in the screening process he had no intention of stripping the Marlins. Whether he did or not is open for debate, but his actions speak otherwise.

The Marlins’ ownership groups have always been a mess, and it goes before Jeter. Have you forgotten the Marlins gutted their franchise after winning the World Series in 1997 and 2003?

This time Jeter didn’t even wait until a parade. He has scuttled the Marlins. So, if you think things are bad with the Mets, imagine being a Marlins fan.

Jan 01

My Hall Of Fame Ballot

I always wait until the last minute before submitting my Hall of Fame ballot. I like to take my time to study the names, consider the numbers and strain to remember games in which I saw them play. There’s just so much to consider.

Not that any one play, or game, or even season matters. It’s about careers, and to my way of thinking, dominant and clean careers. I have no problem with “compilers,’’ players who amassed their numbers because of lengthy careers. After all, players such as Don Sutton and Carl Yastrzemski had to be pretty good to win 300 games or get 3,000 hits.

CHIPPER: He got my vote. (Braves)

CHIPPER: He got my vote. (Braves)

I do have a problem with those accused of using steroids and didn’t need Joe Morgan’s email to convince me. The essence of sports is for the viewers and opposing players to believe what they are watching and whom they are competing against is true.

That’s not possible when players cheat.

So, if a player fails a drug test, is named on the Mitchell Report, or is accused on the record by a player, coach or manager, I look at that as confirmation of steroid usage. It’s not exactly an admission, but it will have to be enough for me to vote no.

My choices are:

Chipper Jones: More than simply a Met killer, he was an eight-time All-Star and a cornerstone on all those Braves teams that reached the playoffs year after year after year. He had 468 career homers, third behind Hall of Fame switch-hitters Mickey Mantle and Eddie Murray.

Jim Thome: What’s not to like about his 612 homers, .402 on-base percentage and .554 slugging percentage, especially when it is done cleanly? He’s a no-brainer to me.

Vladimir Guerrero: I didn’t vote for Guerrero, but only because I voted for Lee Smith, who was in the final year of his eligibility. My thinking was Guerrero would have nine more years on the ballot to make it. But, he was named on 71.7 percent of the ballots, and I think he’ll make it this season.

Mike Mussina: I covered Mussina both with the Orioles and the Yankees, and always regarded him as a money pitcher. He pitched for 18 seasons and won at least 15 games in 11 of them. Mussina won 270 games and could have won 300 if he played another two or three seasons. He had plenty of gas left in his tank as he won 20 games for the only time in his career and pitched 200 innings in the final year of his career. He also had a 1.19 career WHIP and a 3.58 strikeouts-to-walks ratio.

Trevor Hoffman: I’m of the belief relievers matter and they all don’t have to be as good as Mariano Rivera. I firmly believe it Hoffman were on the Yankees instead of Rivera they would have still won those World Series.

Edgar Martinez: Being a DH shouldn’t disqualify a player from consideration. It’s a valid baseball position and shouldn’t devalue a player’s candidacy. He has a career slash line of .310/.410/.510, one of only 14 players in history to do so, and nine of them are in the Hall of Fame.

Fred McGriff: If he gets in, it will likely be from the Veterans Committee. With 493 homers – seven shy from what used to be an automatic ticket – he should be a shoo-in. There’s never been a hint of impropriety. He’s a testament to doing it the right way.

Omar Vizquel: Defense is also a part of the game, but often overlooked by the new age stats. But, if Ozzie Smith is a Hall of Famer, then so is Vizquel, an 11-time Gold Glove Award winner. Vizquel was far from an easy out with 2,877 career hits and a .272 batting average with a .336 on-base percentage.