Nov 03

The market is open.

The free-agent market is open for business and the Mets’ exclusive window for Jose Reyes has slammed shut without an overture from GM Sandy Alderson, which isn’t good business.

Alderson did not meet with Reyes, which is surprising. Why not take the guy and his wife out to dinner and tell him they would like to keep him. If this is a negotiating ploy, I don’t see it.

Reyes’ camp reportedly is not interested in a home team discount, so the interpretation is this will be a cool parting.

The Mets’ have their reservations on Reyes’ health, which is obvious, and do not want to set the market for their shortstop. I maintain they want to see how much the market will shrink to see if Reyes will come back to them as Johan Santana did several years ago.

The Red Sox, Yankees and Cubs won’t be players, leaving San Francisco, the Angels, Philadelphia if it doesn’t sign Jimmy Rollins, and NL East Rivals Washington and Miami.

If I were Alderson, I’d be more concerned about Miami and the Nationals than I would Philadelphia. With or without Rollins, and even without Ryan Howard at the start of the season, the Phillies are better than the Mets. You can throw a blanket over the Mets, Miami and Washington.

One must ascertain from their stance on Reyes that Alderson doesn’t consider the Mets to be as close to contention as their flirtation with .500 would indicate. If he truly believed the Mets were close, even for a wild-card, it would seem they would be more aggressive in retaining Reyes.

According to a variety of sources, the following is the list of the free-agents on the market (ages in parenthesis):

Catchers

Rod Barajas (36) – Type B
Josh Bard (34)
Henry Blanco (40)
Ramon Castro (36)
Ryan Doumit (31) – Type B
Jake Fox (29)
Ramon Hernandez (36) – Type A
Rob Johnson (28)
Jason Kendall (38)
Gerald Laird (32)
Jose Molina (36) – Type B
Dioner Navarro (28)
Ivan Rodriguez (40)
Brian Schneider (35)
Kelly Shoppach (32)
Chris Snyder (31) – Type B
J.R. Towles (28)
Matt Treanor (36)
Jason Varitek (40) – Type B

First basemen
Russell Branyan (36)
Jorge Cantu (30)
Michael Cuddyer (33) – Type A
Prince Fielder (28) – Type A
Ross Gload (36)
Brad Hawpe (33)
Casey Kotchman (29)
Mark Kotsay (36)
Derrek Lee (36) – Type B
Xavier Nady (33)
Lyle Overbay (35)
Carlos Pena (34) – Type B
Albert Pujols (32) – Type A

Second basemen
Clint Barmes (33) – Type B
Willie Bloomquist (34)
Orlando Cabrera (37)
Jamey Carroll (37)
Alex Cora (36)
Craig Counsell (41)
Mark Ellis (35) – Type B
Jerry Hairston Jr. (36)
Bill Hall (32)
Aaron Hill (30) – Type B
Kelly Johnson (30) – Type A
Adam Kennedy (36)
Felipe Lopez (32)
Jose Lopez (28)
Aaron Miles (35)
Nick Punto (34)
Drew Sutton (29)

Shortstops
Clint Barmes (33) – Type B
Yuniesky Betancourt (30) – Type B
Orlando Cabrera (37)
Jamey Carroll (37)
Ronny Cedeno (29)
Craig Counsell (41)
Rafael Furcal (34) – Type B
Alex Gonzalez (34) – Type B
Jerry Hairston Jr. (36)
Cesar Izturis (32)
Nick Punto (34)
Edgar Renteria (35)
Jose Reyes (29) – Type A
Luis Rodriguez (32)
Jimmy Rollins (33) – Type A
Ramon Santiago (32)
Jack Wilson (34)

Third basemen
Wilson Betemit (30) – Type B
Casey Blake (38)
Jorge Cantu (30)
Eric Chavez (34)
Craig Counsell (41)
Mark DeRosa (37)
Greg Dobbs (33)
Jerry Hairston Jr. (36)
Kevin Kouzmanoff (30)
Andy LaRoche (28)
Felipe Lopez (32)
Jose Lopez (28)
Nick Punto (34)
Aramis Ramirez (34) – Type B
Omar Vizquel (45)

Left fielders
Travis Buck (28)
Pat Burrell (35) – Type B
Johnny Damon (37)
Mark DeRosa (37)
Jake Fox (29)
Jay Gibbons (35)
Jonny Gomes (31)
Carlos Guillen (36)
Scott Hairston (32)
Bill Hall (32)
Willie Harris (34)
Raul Ibanez (40) – Type B
Conor Jackson (30)
Reed Johnson (35)
Fred Lewis (31)
Ryan Ludwick (33) – Type B
Jason Michaels (36)
Laynce Nix (31)
Wily Mo Pena (30)
Felix Pie (27)
Juan Pierre (34) – Type B
Marcus Thames (35)
Josh Willingham (33) – Type A

Center fielders
Rick Ankiel (32)
Willie Bloomquist (34)
Mike Cameron (39)
Endy Chavez (34)
Coco Crisp (32)
David DeJesus (32) – Type B
Scott Hairston (32)
Andruw Jones (35)
Nate McLouth (30)
Corey Patterson (32)
Cody Ross (31) – Type B
Grady Sizemore (29)
Dewayne Wise (34)

Right fielders
Carlos Beltran (35) – Type A, cannot be offered arbitration
Willie Bloomquist (34)
Milton Bradley (34)
Michael Cuddyer (33) – Type A
David DeJesus (32) – Type B
J.D. Drew (36)
Kosuke Fukudome (35)
Willie Harris (34)
Brad Hawpe (33)
Jason Kubel (29) – Type B
Ryan Ludwick (33) – Type B
Xavier Nady (33)
Magglio Ordonez (38) – Type B
Cody Ross (31) – Type B
Josh Willingham (33) – Type A

Designated hitters
Milton Bradley (34)
Johnny Damon (37)
Vladimir Guerrero (37) – Type B
Carlos Guillen (36)
David Ortiz (36) – Type A
Jason Kubel (29) – Type B
Hideki Matsui (38)
Wily Mo Pena (30)
Jorge Posada (40)
Jim Thome (41)

Starting pitchers
Erik Bedard (33)
Mark Buehrle (33) – Type B
Chris Capuano (33)
Bruce Chen (35) – Type B
Bartolo Colon (39)
Aaron Cook (33)
Kyle Davies (28)
Doug Davis (36)
Zach Duke (29)
Jeff Francis (30)
Armando Galarraga (30)
Freddy Garcia (36) – Type B
Jon Garland (32)
Aaron Harang (34) – Type B
Rich Harden (30)
Livan Hernandez (37)
Hisashi Iwakuma (31)
Edwin Jackson (28) – Type B
Hiroki Kuroda (37) – Type B
Rodrigo Lopez (36)
Paul Maholm (30)
Jason Marquis (33)
Kevin Millwood (37)
Sergio Mitre (31)
Roy Oswalt (34) – Type A
Brad Penny (34)
Joel Pineiro (33)
Mitch Talbot (28)
Javier Vazquez (35)
Tsuyoshi Wada (31)
Tim Wakefield (45)
Chien-Ming Wang (32)
Brandon Webb (33)
Dontrelle Willis (30)
C.J. Wilson (31) – Type A
Chris Young (33)

Closers
Heath Bell (34) – Type A
Jonathan Broxton (28)
Matt Capps (28) – Type A
Francisco Cordero (37) – Type A
Frank Francisco (32) – Type B
Ryan Madson (31) – Type A
Joe Nathan (37)
Jonathan Papelbon (31) – Type A
Jon Rauch (33) – Type B
Francisco Rodriguez (30) – Type A

Right-handed relievers
David Aardsma (29)
Jeremy Accardo (30)
Luis Ayala (34)
Danys Baez (34)
Miguel Batista (41)
Shawn Camp (36) – Type B
Todd Coffey (31)
Juan Cruz (31)
Octavio Dotel (38) – Type A
Chad Durbin (34)
Jeff Fulchino (32)
Juan Gutierrez (28)
LaTroy Hawkins (37)
Aaron Heilman (33)
Ryota Igarashi (33)
Jason Isringhausen (39)
Brad Lidge (35) – Type B
Scott Linebrink (35)
Mike MacDougal (35)
Guillermo Mota (38)
Pat Neshek (31)
Ramon Ortiz (39)
Vicente Padilla (34)
Tony Pena (30)
Chad Qualls (33)
Jon Rauch (33) – Type B
Fernando Rodney (35)
Takashi Saito (42) – Type A
Dan Wheeler (34) – Type B
Kerry Wood (35) – Type B
Jamey Wright (37)
Michael Wuertz (33)
Joel Zumaya (27)

Left-handed relievers
Mike Gonzalez (34)
John Grabow (33)
Damaso Marte (37)
Trever Miller (39)
Darren Oliver (41) – Type A
Arthur Rhodes (41) – Type B
J.C. Romero (36)
George Sherrill (35)
Brian Tallet (34)

 

Jan 26

Jan. 26.10: Sheets off the board; Smoltz still available.

Ben Sheets apparently wasn’t worth the gamble, so he signed with Oakland for $10 million. I’m not even sure the Mets made an offer.

I understand the Mets’ reasoning and can’t fault them here. Sheets was a DL trip waiting to happen, and the Mets have too many of those already.

On Jan. 23, I wrote, “But, it’s better than remaining stagnant,’’ regarding Sheets which was a lukewarm endorsement.

Elsewhere:

• Johan Santana and Oliver Perez threw in Port St. Lucie without pain.
• The Mets are still contemplating signing John Smoltz.
• The Cubs signed former Mets outfielder Xavier Nady.

Check out the new poll.

Jan 05

Jan. 5.10: You asked for it, you got it.

Both Harry and Ray in a recent thread expressed interest in reading about Omar Minaya’s best deals. There have been more than a few. Some of his bad ones were actually good in the beginning, such as Oliver Perez and Guillermo Mota.

There were also decisions on Carlos Beltran, Carlos Delgado, Paul Lo Duca, Alex Cora and signing David Wright and Jose Reyes to long term extensions. The John Maine trade was good. Nobody could have thought he would be injured. Getting Xavier Nady was a good deal.

We must remember, that in all fairness, the Mets came within an inning of the World Series in 2006. Minaya put that team together.

Julio Franco, Moises Alou, Orlando Hernandez all had moments, but the negative reviews came with the subsequent contract extensions.

So, let’s have some fun with this today and talk about Omar Minaya’s Greatest Hits.

Dec 01

Omar’s infamous moves ….

This time next week, Mets GM Omar Minaya will be in Indianapolis, working the room to make a deal. The flip side is also true, agents and GMs trying to work Minaya.

And, several have been successful in doing so.

Minaya has had an interesting tenure with the Mets, making some good and bad decisions. I’m interested in your opinion of the worst Minaya deals.

Here are some of the nominations:

MINAYA: What's this year's bombshell announcement?

MINAYA: What's this year's bombshell announcement?


OLIVER PEREZ: Re-signing lefty Oliver Perez last winter to a three-year, $36-million contract could go down as one of the worst deals in Mets history.

LUIS CASTILLO: Re-signing second baseman Luis Castillo to a four-year, $24-million deal after the 2007 season. Castillo redeemed his miserable 2008 season with a good year in 2009, but signing him meant the Mets couldn’t go after Orlando Hudson or any other viable second baseman. Two more years.

MOISES ALOU: After playing in just 87 games in 2007, the Mets picked up outfielder Moises Alou’s $7.5 million option. Injuries to the 41-year-old Alou limited him to 15 games the following season. Of course, it wasn’t a great idea to have the option in there in the first place.
Continue reading

Jan 22

What about Griffey?

Ken Griffey, like a lot of people, is looking for work. He’s not ready to retire, and hitting 18 homers last season with 71 RBI in 490 at-bats. Not great, but good enough in a part time role.

While the Mets aren’t in it for Manny Ramirez, and I don’t believe they’ll be able to make a trade with the Yankees to reaquire Xavier Nady. They apparently, and this is too bad, aren’t interested in Adam Dunn.

Why not give Griffey a year? The guy still has his moments, and for one year, he’d be a good fit in left field.