Nov 02

Do Mets Regret Wright Contract?

While the news is encouraging regarding David Wright’s rehab program on his sprained left shoulder, the Mets must be wondering about his future and the eight-year, $138-million contract they gave him that could financially tie their hands through 2020.

Wright missed the last three weeks of the season and all reports say he’ll be ready for spring training. Wright’s rehab program ended Saturday and barring any setbacks he will avoid surgery and begin his regular offseason program.

WRIGHT: Do Mets regret contract? (Getty)

WRIGHT: Do Mets regret contract? (Getty)

Said Wright: “No setbacks, we’re moving forward. That’s all you can ask. I’m going to get checked out by the doctors. We’ll see how that goes and that will kind of determine what’s next as far as the plan moving towards next year.’’

Staying healthy has been a problem for Wright in recent seasons. In addition to last year, he missed 45 games with a hamstring strain in 2013, and in 2011 a stress fracture in his lower back limited him to 102 games.

Nobody doubts Wright’s effort, work ethic or competitive desire. They just don’t know if he can stay on the field.

The Mets are looking for power from Wright, whose best season was 2008 when he hit 33 homers with 124 RBI, 115 runs scored, 189 hits, 42 doubles and a .924 OPS. He hasn’t hit 30 homers, scored over 100 runs, hit as many doubles or had as high a OPS since. Only once since then did he drive in over 100 runs.

Just as important is he’s played in as many as 150 games twice since 2008.

The Mets signed Wright long-term because he’s the face of the franchise and what he means to the fan base as much as for his offensive potential. Considering the flack they took for letting Jose Reyes depart, they couldn’t afford to let Wright go.

However, he’s 31 and they have to be thinking if they regret this contract.

Mar 07

Good Idea To Ease In David Wright

There will be a David Wright sighting this afternoon for the New York Mets. Manager Terry Collins, referring to an oblique strain in previous springs, took the approach of easing Wright and Daniel Murphy into the lineup this spring.

WRIGHT: Easing into it. (AP)

WRIGHT: Easing into it. (AP)

My first impression is Wright doesn’t need to be rushed and if this helps him stay healthy, I’m behind it all the way. Spring training is a grind as it is, so resting is a good strategy since Wright will get the necessary at-bats needed to get ready.

“Spring training is so long. It’s really for the pitchers’ benefit, to get them stretched out,’’ Wright said earlier this week. “Terry approached me even during the offseason and kind of told me, `Don’t be surprised if in spring training I slow you down a little bit and push you back.’

“The last couple of years I’ve had the abdominal/oblique injuries. So to kind of slow it up this year, to kind of take those baby steps before ramping it up, I think helps me out.’’

Hitters normally get close to 90 at-bats in the spring. If they feel like it isn’t enough, they can always be scheduled in simulated games where they can get up to seven in a game. Wright, as he usually does, shows up several weeks earlier. He’s been taking batting practice since the Super Bowl.

“I felt like I got good work in,’’ Wright said. “I felt I’m a lot more prepared now than I have been in recent spring trainings to enter games, and I think I’ll get a little more out of it.’’

Wright’s work entails hitting, defense and conditioning. It’s been a concentrated effort since the games began; an effort he wouldn’t have been able to do had he been playing all this time.

There has been more intense training this spring compared to last year because then he was playing in the World Baseball Classic.

As always, everything is up for review. If, during the season, Wright feels fresher, then this has been a good routine. If he doesn’t feel as sharp at the start of the season, he can always change next year.

Either way, this is a useful experiment.