Nov 01

Toast Murphy Tonight; Don’t Boo Him

It should be wild tonight at Citi Field as we say good bye to the Mets for the season. No matter what happens, we won’t see the Mets at home again until next April. By definition, a great World Series needs to go seven and we aren’t there, yet.

Hopefully, we’ll have another couple of nights of watching them on television.

Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom and Noah Syndergaard have won three straight before this season, and for that season to continue, they must do so again. However, before they can win three straight, they need to win one, and that’s Harvey.

MURPHY: Toast him; don't boo him. (Getty)

MURPHY: Toast him; don’t boo him. (Getty)

It’s fitting that perhaps the final game of the season should come down to Harvey, because in many ways, this whole year is about him. Will he be able to pitch? If so, how many innings will he pitch? He likes to portray himself as a Super Hero pitcher, but let’s face it, he has a long way to go before he can be thought of in that light.

His legacy has yet to be written, but a victory tonight would be a good chapter.

Daniel Murphy, however, is what he is, which is a hard working player who has enjoyed a storybook postseason until last night. He’s played four different positions out of necessity for the Mets, but his best is batter, and he even has limitations at that one.

It is believed the Mets will give him a qualifying offer this winter, but there are no guarantees. I want him back, but would not be surprised if the Mets pass on him. If their decision was based on last night that would be totally unfair, but baseball is not always fair.

So, if you’re at Citi Field tonight, don’t boo him because of last night. Instead drink a toast to his work ethic, personality and what he’s meant to the Mets, and us, over the last few years.

He deserves that.

Oct 31

Mets’ Future Free Agents Do In Team

It was there for the taking, but the Mets wouldn’t have anything to do with victory and let Game 4 of the World Series slip away from them like a ground ball under Daniel Murphy’s glove.

Oh, wait, that actually did happen.

MURPHY: Critical error. (AP)

MURPHY: Critical error. (AP)

“You can’t give a good team extra outs,’’ said dumbfounded Mets manager Terry Collins, who also contributed to the late-inning collapse in Saturday night’s 5-3 loss to the Royals, the team that won’t die.

In the end, the likely end to the Mets’ 2015 postseason came down to three players who probably won’t be here next season for not making the plays when they needed to most.

Tyler Clippard, Murphy and Yoenis Cespedes did nothing to endear themselves to Mets’ fans and GM Sandy Alderson.

However, let’s first start with Collins, who pulled Bartolo Colon before going with hot reliever Addison Reed in the seventh. You go with your hot hand and Collins should have stayed with Colon and ride him until he gave up a base runner before going to Reed.

Reed was terrific, but the template backfired on Collins when Clippard walked two in the eighth. First of all, Collins should have gone with Jeurys Familia for a two-inning save. Only trouble is Collins was reluctant to go with Familia because he had worked an inning Friday night in a blowout win in Game 3. That was lame. This time of year, your closer has to work two, maybe three nights in a row.

So, not having Familia in there falls on Collins. Also falling on Collins is not pulling Clippard after the first walk. At this stage, Clippard gets one runner before he’s pulled.

Then came a grounder to Murphy. The snake of a grounder slithered under his glove and the game was tied. Then it totally slipped away from the Mets.

“Jeurys did his job, I didn’t do mine,’’ said the always stand-up Murphy. “I misplayed it. There’s no excuse for it. We lost the ballgame because of it.’’

The Mets put the tying runs on base in the ninth, but Cespedes was doubled off first on a soft liner to third baseman Michael Moustakas. Despite a runner on base ahead of him, Cespedes was running.

Where was he going? What was he thinking?

Later, he offered the lame excuse. “I thought it was going to touch the grass,’’ Cespedes said. “I didn’t think it would be a double play.’’

I don’t blame Murphy as errors happen. I don’t really blame Clippard because wildness happens. However, neither Collins nor Cespedes had their heads in the game when they needed to most.

That’s why the Mets are 27 outs from winter.

Oct 31

Mets Now The Hammer?

The Mets’ appreciation of hard knocks depends on whether they are the hammer or the nail on any given day.

Not surprisingly, they didn’t like Chase Utley’s hard slide into Ruben Tejada in Game 2 of the NLDS. Of course, they overwhelmingly endorsed Noah Syndergaard buzzing Alcides Escobar’s head on the first pitch of Game 1.

SYNDERGAARD: Turns tone of Series to Mets. (Getty)

SYNDERGAARD: Turns tone of Series to Mets. (Getty)

Syndergaard didn’t back off his intentions after the game, and in fact, boasted about them.

“If they have a problem with me throwing inside, they can meet me 60 feet, 6 inches away,’’ which was not the brightest of things for Syndergaard to say later.

The Royals haven’t stopped chirping about that pitch, and neither have the Mets.

“He went out there and did his job, and we’re all proud of him for that,’’ said Game 5 starter Matt Harvey. “His comments are, I think for us, kind of taken with a grain of salt. But we’re obviously happy about what he did.’’

There was a lot of speculation about payback before the game, but that was never going to happen.

It’s the World Series and nobody wants to tossed.

And, it’s the World Series an no team likes to have the momentum turn against them, but that’s the case here. The games have been close, but the Royals aren’t the same team they were in Kansas City. And, neither are the Mets. They are now the hammer.

Oct 30

In Noah, The Mets Do Trust

It’s funny how things worked out for the Mets. They were reluctant to bring up Noah Syndergaard in May, but now in October they are counting on him to extend their dream season. Down two games to Kansas City, Syndergaard will take his 100 mph., fastball to the mound tonight at Citi Field.

“We’ve got great confidence in him,” said manager Terry Collins. “I think as much as you’d like to go to that crusty, veteran guy who’s been here, who’s done it, to help bail you out of the hole you’re in, we’re not asking that. We’re asking this kid to go out and pitch his game, and his stuff should play.”

SYNDERGAARD: The future is now. (Getty)

SYNDERGAARD: The future is now. (Getty)

The Mets entered the World Series with a decided edge in starting pitching, but Matt Harvey (6) and Jacob deGrom (5) gave them a combined 11 innings in the first two games. Syndergaard must give them at least seven innings to keep the Royals away from the Mets’ bullpen.

Along with the Mets’ starters, another story line was the Royals’ hitters ability to make contact, especially against fastballs over 95 mph. Syndergaard is 1-1 with a 2.77 ERA and spoke as if he has this playoff thing down pat.

The question has always been posed to pitchers for years: Does he pitch to his strength, even if it is the hitter’s strength as well?

Syndergaard knows a pitcher never wants to get beat with his secondary pitches; if he goes down it will be with his best.

“My main focus is to pitch to my strengths and being able to execute all my pitches, and just focus on winning one pitch at a time,” said Syndergaard, speaking like the veteran he isn’t.

It’s funny how things work. The Mets didn’t want to bring up Syndergaard in May to delay his arbitration and free-agent years to have him conveniently locked up for the future. The Mets singled out their young pitching as the foundation for their future, but the future is now for the Mets.

It is tonight.

ON DECK: Tonight’s lineup.