Jan 12

Collins Learns And Moves On From Game 5

Mets manager Terry Collins allowed himself three days to stew on his decision to let Matt Harvey pitch – and kick away – the ninth inning of Game 5 of the World Series. Undoubtedly, he’ll relive that decision when spring training begins in little over a month.

COLLINS: Trusted Harvey. (AP)

COLLINS: Trusted Harvey. (AP)

In the MLB Network documentary, “Terry Collins: A Life In Baseball,” which airs Tuesday night, he said: “I had my bad three days. You’ve got to move on.”

I never thought Collins should have let Harvey stay in, thinking he went away from his principles. But, it was Collins’ decision, not mine, and he has to live with what happened. We have no way of knowing what would have happened had Jeurys Familia entered the game. It isn’t a slam dunk Familia would have saved the game. Afterall, he already blew a save in the Series.

Even had Familia saved the game, the Royals would have had a 3-2 Series lead with Games 6 and 7 in Kansas City. There were no guarantees.

“I don’t know what would have happened, after [Game 5],” Collins said on the show. “But, in my mind , we should’ve made the change. … I trusted this young man. I think the world of him . I still do. We made it. It didn’t work. You’ve got to move forward from it.”

Collins has spent his entire life around baseball, and knows everything is a learning experience. Collins went against what he thought was best and trusted his player.

Here’s hoping he learned from that and will become a better manager for it.

 

Jan 11

Not Collins’ Job To Motivate Mets

As a longtime follower, reporter and blogger about the Mets, I read just about everything I can about the team. Some of it makes sense, some of it does not. I read something today – over a month before the start of spring training – that made me wonder it is with some people.

The author wrote how he couldn’t wait for spring training to see how Terry Collins would motivate the Mets.

Huh?

A major league manager only singularly motivates his players. There is no rah-rah speeches. These guys are professional athletes who are beyond having a manager or coach light a fire under them. Frankly, if you’re a professional athlete and need a manager for motivation you’re not long for the sport. These guys, who all make the minimum of $500-thousand, motivate themselves.

Collectively, this team surprised a lot of people to reach the World Series. All of them should be stinging over what happened to them. Perhaps, the player with the most heat is Matt Harvey over the ninth inning of Game 5.

I’m guessing he’s done a slow burn all winter. At least I hope so.

Dec 21

More Proof Matt Harvey Doesn’t Get It

Matt Harvey said he’s mad the Mets didn’t win the World Series. That’s fine. However, when he had the chance to answer the batting practice question on The Player’s Tribune of what his biggest regret was in 2015, and responded with “becoming a Belieber,” in regard to becoming a fan of singer Justin Bieber, he blew it.

Then he wrote, is it too late now to say sorry?”

HARVEY: Walking away after World Series collapse. (AP)

HARVEY: Walking away after World Series collapse. (AP)

Maybe he was trying to be cute. Only he knows for sure. But, let’s call The Player’s Tribune for what it is, a joke of a sports media website created by Derek Jeter.

There’s no question Jeter is a future Hall of Famer, but there’s also no denying he was given a free pass by most New York media and created this website because he doesn’t want to truthfully answer or address any tough questions.

Pretty much the same thing applies to Harvey. Until his innings fiasco, the New York media wouldn’t cross Harvey on any issue, despite having just cause. Harvey is the New York correspondent for Jeter’s site. Nobody will question him there.

If Harvey had any stand-up backbone to him, he would have answered the question with “my behavior in the dugout directed at Terry Collins in the World Series.”

But, he didn’t. And, won’t. Not on The Player’s Tribune. Not anywhere. A player’s only website is like a player’s Twitter in that nothing meaningful is ever mentioned. Even so, I checked it out today just in the off chance Harvey wrote anything worthwhile.

He did not. If Harvey does want to apologize for anything, it should be to Collins and his teammates for putting himself over them at the worst possible time.

 

Dec 18

Mets Still Have Voids To Fill

We are a week from Christmas and two months away from the start of spring training and the Mets still have two significant concerns to address:

CENTER FIELD: The Mets need a platoon with Juan Lagares, preferably a left-handed bat the equal of Yoenis Cespedes. That’s going to be tough. Making their quest even more difficult is the growing speculation they are going to do this on the cheap.

There does not seem to be sentiment to let Lagares open the season in a full time capacity, similar to what they did with Wilmer Flores.

Dexter Fowler and Denard Span are the names most frequently mentioned, however, they are lower tier options.

While neither are top drawer, they are at the point in their careers where they want the chance to play full time and won’t be anxious to enter into a platoon situation.

By the time the Mets get around talking with them, the market may be depleted, elevating them to the top of what is left – consequently probably making them too expensive to sign.

BULLPEN: Signing Bartolo Colon improves the bullpen, but you must remember that probably doesn’t happen until Zack Wheeler returns in July. Until then, things are thin. Jenrry Mejia was tendered for 2016. They are also bringing back Addison Reed and Jerry Blevins, and Tyler Clippard remains a possibility.

So, for now we really can’t say the Mets are significantly better than they were at the end of the season. And, please don’t underestimate how important this area is to the Mets. There is no return trip to the World Series, and maybe not even the playoffs without a better bullpen.

Dec 13

Mets Can’t Afford To Stand Pat

The 2006 season ended for the Mets with Carlos Beltran frozen by a wicked Adam Wainwright curveball with the bat on his shoulder. The Mets reasoned with another break or two, they could have won the NLCS that year and advanced to the World Series. Perhaps thinking if the breaks went their way in 2007 they might get to the World Series, the Mets did precious little that winter.

METS: Can't stand pat now.

METS: Can’t stand pat now.

Maintaining the status quo didn’t work out then and the Mets can’t afford to duplicate that thinking this winter.

The Mets upgraded their up-the-middle defense with the additions of Neil Walker and Asdrubal Cabrera, but there is more to be done and this isn’t the time for them to be cautious. Attendance at Citi Field will increase this summer as it usually does after a playoff season, but that shouldn’t alleviate the Mets of their responsibility to put a good team on the field and their response should be to be aggressive.

Their situation in the bullpen and in center field isn’t good enough to win with now, and they have several other questions. Will their sterling rotation stay healthy and continue to progress? Will David Wright remain healthy? Will Lucas Duda be consistent? Will Michael Conforto make the next step?

They’ve already done something to back-up Wright, but Michael Cuddyer‘s retirement and not bringing back Daniel Murphy leaves a gap behind Duda? They must remember Conforto won’t take anybody by surprise this year..

That being said, the bullpen and center field are the main weak links and this is no time to stand pat. Especially since Chicago has improved, as has San Francisco and Arizona. You can also count on the Dodgers and Nationals being aggressive the rest of the winter.

I don’t expect Mets to re-sign Yoenis Cespedes, but there are other options and Kirk Nieuwenhuis shouldn’t be among them. And, expecting Hansel Robles to be a bullpen stud is wishful thinking.

This isn’t the time for the Mets to watch the turnstiles click, because if they think repeating is a given that would be mistake.