Dec 10

Mets Almost Too Desperate To Deal Niese and Gee

Mets GM Sandy Alderson seems determined, almost to a fault, to trade his excess pitching and the signing of Jon Lester by the Chicago Cubs can only help in his efforts.

Those wanting a left-hander, “Jon Niese is available” Alderson will tell anyone within earshot. But, first things first, he wants to dump Dillon Gee’s $5 million contract. Remember, priorities.

Speaking today with reporters at the Winter Meetings, Alderson said: “We’re comfortable that we’ll be doing something. It could happen today. It could happen tomorrow. It might be a little later.’’

Sounds like a firm timetable. I am betting on later, most likely after the meetings.

San Francisco and Boston, both of whom lost out on Lester – with the Red Sox, it was their own fault as they low-balled him – and Texas, Kansas City and Minnesota all need pitching and reportedly are willing to spend.

Since Lester was the lead pitching domino, it stands to reason Alderson’s phone would ring more. Once James Shields and Max Scherzer are off the board things could warm up for the Mets.

However, it must be remembered Niese and Gee have been dangled by Alderson for several months now. Alderson’s eagerness to trade them sends the message they aren’t valued highly be the Mets. Teams know this and believe they can always come back to the Mets if their Plan A doesn’t pan out.

Any real estate agent will tell you that the longer a house stays on the market the price will go down.

It’s the nature of the market.

Dec 07

Patience Is Mets’ Winter Meetings Approach

The Mets enter the Winter Meetings with three needs, but don’t expect any to be met soon because of their approach of waiting out the process.

They are seeking a shortstop, a right-handed bat off the bench and left-handed reliever.

The Mets want an upgrade over shortstop Wilmer Flores, but for now aren’t biting on Stephen DrewAsdrubal Cabrera or Jed Lowrie. They could have had any of the three if they wanted and their thinking is to wait this out to see if their asking price will drop.

Another possibility, Didi Gregorius, was acquired by the Yankees in a trade. The Mets aren’t inclined to deal to fill any of their needs unless a team takes either Bartolo Colon, Jon Niese or Dillon Gee. Because determining the free-agent market usually comes before trades, the problem facing the Mets in dealing their pitchers is teams needing pitching first want to see where Jon Lester, Max Scherzer or James Shields land.

So, for now, waiting appears to be the Mets’ course of action. No surprise there.


Dec 05

Flores Buys Mets Time

With the Winter Meetings days away, the Mets’ shortstop options are dwindling. You can scratch Didi Gregorius from their list today after Arizona traded him to the Yankees in a three-way deal that also included Detroit.

GREGORIUS: Never a real option. (Getty)

GREGORIUS: Never a real option. (Getty)

We’ve gone over the Mets’ options several times this week, and to me it all comes back to Wilmer Flores. Flores isn’t without concerns, otherwise we wouldn’t be going over this topic again … and again … and again.

I’ve written several times why Flores should be first in line, ranging from his salary to the asking price from other teams in terms of prospects and salary for any potential replacement. These players, including Gregorius would tie the Mets’ hands in terms of payroll and years.

However, Flores would only burden the Mets for one season, and they enter 2015 as playoff long shots in the first place. Flores buys them time to figure out their shortstop dilemma and that’s attractive to the Mets. If Flores works out, that’s a plus. If he doesn’t, there’s always next year.

I would hope if the Mets were sure about Flores one way or another they would be more proactive.

Feb 18

Mets’ Zack Wheeler Likes Low Profile

One of the highlights for the New York Mets last season was a double-header sweep of Atlanta anchored by future aces Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler.

If you weren’t reading about Harvey last summer you were reading about Wheeler. This spring most of the ink is going to Noah Syndergaard, whom the Mets expect will be in the major leagues in June.

WHEELER: That night in Atlanta.

WHEELER: That night in Atlanta.

“That’s fine with me,’’ Wheeler told reporters Tuesday in Port St. Lucie when asked about the spotlight being on Syndergaard. “I don’t have to have all the attention.’’

Actually, in Wheeler’s perfect world, he would rather have little, if any. Wheeler is extremely quiet and shy, and if given the choice, he’d rather not talk if he didn’t have to.

Wheeler was 7-5 with a 3.42 ERA last season in 17 starts. Manager Terry Collins doesn’t presently see an innings limit on Wheeler, and believes his composure and natural stuff will enable him to progress.

Collins said at the Winter Meetings Harvey showed he could make adjustments on the run and thinks Wheeler has that same capability.

Wheeler was matter-of-fact when asked today what he needs to do to improve: “Just being more consistent, throwing more strikes and stuff.’’

Ask any veteran pitcher and he’d say the same thing. That’s one of the things the Mets like about Wheeler.


Jan 22

What Can Mets Expect From Zack Wheeler?

What exactly should the New York Mets realistically expect from Zack Wheeler this summer?

He was 7-5 with a 3.42 ERA in 17 starts last year, and to double the victories would be a good progression especially if his starts were doubled to 34. What is unfair would be to think he’s have a Matt Harvey type season, one in which he captured the imagination of the city and made the All-Star team.

WHEELER: What can we expect?

WHEELER: What can we expect?

I’m not in agreement with those who debunk the traditional pitching statistics of victories and ERA, which have been fair measuring sticks for over 100 years. Just because something has been a staple for a century-plus does not make it outdated or obsolete.

Victories mean games won, and isn’t that the objective of the sport – to win games? I realize the game has changed and pitchers don’t throw complete games anymore, but even with limited innings, getting a “W’’ means you kept your team in the game. How is that not important?

If Wheeler can increase his victories by one a month, that’s six over the course of the season, and 13 total for the year. I’d take that for starters.

An ERA measures runs allowed, which is vastly more important for a starter, because even a few runs over a short number of innings greatly inflates a reliever’s ERA.

If Wheeler duplicates last year’s ERA, especially with an increase over last season’s 100 innings it would be more than acceptable. Manager Terry Collins suggested during the Winter Meetings 200 innings for Wheeler isn’t out of the question, but an innings limit hasn’t been ruled out.

What Harvey accomplished last year prior to his injury was exceptional, but that was his achievement, not Wheeler’s. Wheeler is unique in his own right and to say he’ll be just as dominant is unfair.

For now, I just don’t want to see a regression, just some improvement to suggest he’s heading in the right direction.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos