May 31

Too Much Made Of Jeff Wilpon’s Comments

I could not help but laugh over the flap made over Jeff Wilpon’s comments Tuesday during the Mets’ gift presentation to retiring Yankees reliever Mariano Rivera.

In giving Rivera a fire hose nozzle and fire call box symbolic of being the history’s greatest closer, Wilpon said: “I wish we could see you in the World Series, but I’m not sure that’s going to happen this year.’’

WILPON: No harm, no foul.

WILPON: No harm, no foul.

The perception is Wilpon has already given up on the season. Of course, the Mets could make a historic run, but does anybody really believe that is possible? I don’t, and neither should anybody with half a brain, or someone with any knowledge of baseball.

Go ahead, save that paragraph and give it to me if the Mets are in the World Series. Wilpon wasn’t trashing his own team and it slays me to have read otherwise this week.

From the media, it was somebody reaching for a headline. And, from the talk-radio crowd, just the same old provincial drivel from those who believe in a conspiracy against the Mets. Sure, it would be great to see October baseball again, but it won’t happen for the Mets this year.

If you’ve been paying attention, don’t count on the Mets reaching contender status for two or three more seasons. They simply have too many holes and weaknesses.

Then there is the issue whether the Mets are able to use Wilpon’s words as motivation. Collins told ESPN.com prior to Thursday’s game such external motivation was overrated.

“You’d have to take a poll in there [of] how many guys read that stuff,’’ Collins said. “If that motivated them, we’ll be blasting them again tonight.’’

True enough.

These guys are professionals and if they are reliant on quotes such as Wilpon’s or bulletin board material they are in trouble. Occasionally that stuff works, but not on a consistent basis, and not enough to carry a mediocre-to-weak team over the course of a season.

The flipside of Wilpon’s comments is if he said something like, “we’ll see you in the World Series,’’ he would have been roasted for being cocky, with his words held against him when it didn’t happen.

Collins, whose job is of lame duck status, certainly isn’t stupid enough to rally his team around his boss’ comments. And, Wilpon definitely would not attempt to rattle the collective cages of his players by slighting them.

Sometimes, too much is made of nothing, and this is one of those times.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Feb 27

Mets And Amway; An Odd Couple

This is why they are the Mets. Their ownership group gets stung by a Ponzi scheme, loses millions of dollars and was on the verge, with an unfavorable court ruling, of possibly losing the franchise.

So, what does it do? It aligns itself with Amway, a direct seller who has been sued for being a pyramid scheme.

imgresAmway employs millions to sell home cleaning products and vitamins, but mostly to convince others to do the same. That’s where an Amway distributor makes its money.

This is as odd a choice as the Mets could have made for a business partner. Seriously, doesn’t anybody in the organization have a filter that could have caught this?

“Excuse me, Mr. Wilpon, but we should think twice about this,’’ somebody should have said.

So, on the side of Citi Field there is a sign promoting Amway, a corporation which settled a class action lawsuit for millions after being accused of operating a pyramid scheme.

Nobody saw the connection?

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Feb 17

Delcos Sunday Column: Wright Being The Mets’ Jeter

As usual, David Wright was attempting to be modest when he downplayed owner Fred Wilpon’s comments this week that he “is the Mets’ Derek Jeter.’’

Statistically, there’s not a comparison, in that Jeter has over 3,000 hits and five World Series rings and is a slam dunk Hall of Famer if he didn’t play another game. Unquestionably, he’s in on the first ballot. There’s no denying is greatness as a player.

As for Wright, he hits for more power, but will have to turn it on for the remainder of his contract if he’s to catch Jeter in a number of statistical categories.

As a clutch player, Jeter has few peers.

Defensively, both are good at their positions. Both can run.

Of course, Jeter has played longer and with a better team, so his numbers would be superior.

However, Wilpon wasn’t talking about statistics. Wilpon was referring to the intangibles both bring to their respective teams. These are qualities that can’t be measured.

Jeter is the Yankees’ captain and I expect Terry Collins to make a similar appointment to Wright, although neither needs an official designation to know they are the leaders of their teams.

When something happens in baseball or with their teams, both are sought after as being the player spokesman. Writers know articles with quotes from Wright and Jeter seem to be more authoritative. When you want the temperature of the Mets, one talks to Wright. When you want it of the Yankees, Jeter is the guy.

Both are players the younger guys look up, and both have no problems calling out somebody who doesn’t hustle or makes a mistake. When a pitcher needs calming down, you’ll see both go to the mound.

Both are the respective faces of their teams. Both are their current identities. Unquestionably, both are the players the fans pay to see.

Both have the intangibles you can see and feel, but there is no statistical measure.

And, you can’t imagine either in another team’s uniform. That’s why free agency never really applied to either. Despite his coy references, you knew Jeter wasn’t going anywhere.

And, despite the Mets’ economic crunch, I never had the feeling Wright would leave on his own. Jeter will retire a Yankee and go to the Hall of Fame. Wright will retire a Met, and if he finishes the second half of his career like the first half, he too, should see Cooperstown.

That’s what Wilpon meant.

Dec 17

Dickey Deal Near Done; Pelfrey Officially Gone, Too

It’s almost done, a mere hours now before R.A. Dickey gets his “Get Out of Jail Free Card,’’ otherwise known as his contract extension with the Toronto Blue Jays.

DICKEY: Toronto bound.

The trade will be complete and Dickey will have nothing more to do with the penny-pinching Mets, the team he saved from total embarrassment this summer by winning the Cy Young Award.

Those words from Jeff Wilpon and Sandy Alderson, that re-signing Dickey was a priority have rung hollow as we expected they might. Dickey, the best thing the Mets had last season, will take his talents and dancing knuckleball to Toronto, hopefully a franchise that will realize what he brings to the table.

While this will be written off by the Mets that Alderson maximized what he could get for Dickey, much like he did when he acquired Zack Wheeler for Carlos Beltran, that’s not totally true.

In Travis d’Arnaud, a 24-year catcher with a bad knee, the Mets don’t know what they are getting.  In Dickey, maybe the Mets had a one-year wonder, which might have been the driving force behind the trade: Get what they can now because they don’t know if Dickey could do it again.

What the Mets did know what they had in Dickey was a genuine personality in a sport where there seems to be so few. Dickey pitched with pain, grit and determination and related to the public like few had before him.

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Dec 06

The Questions David Wright Should Have Asked The Mets

David Wright spoke of a new day at his press conference yesterday, saying: “There’s a hundred different factors that went into this decision. But before any of them could be taken into consideration, number one had to be that commitment to winning. And, I got the answers that I wanted to hear.”

WRIGHT: What is he thinking?

Oh, to be a fly on that wall. I wonder what questions Wright asked and what the Wilpon’s answers were. Wright didn’t say, but if I were him these are the questions I would ask:

1) “I am staying, which saves you from taking a PR hit. I am deferring money, so how are you going to spend it?”

2) O.K., you got a break in the Madoff case. How long will that continue to be a factor in not getting players to help me?”

3) “What is going on with R.A. Dickey? You do realize our pitching isn’t all that great to begin with and will be worse if he leaves, so are you going to sign him?”

4) “We all know Johan (Santana) is gone after this year, so how are you going to spend that $25 million in 2014?”

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