May 15

Mets Should Have No Untouchables

With the Mets’ eight-game lead over Washington down to one, we are at the part of the season when panic sets in. They must do something, and fast.

Yes, Wilmer Flores – who leads the team in home runs, by the way – has been dreadful at shortstop. Naturally, he’s the one who must go and the Mets have to trade for a shortstop. In the car, if not the Rolling Stones or Eagles, I will sometimes listen to sports talk radio. Yes, yes, I know it’s a dumb thing to do, but like chocolate it is sometimes hard to resist.

HARVEY: No untouchables. (Getty)

HARVEY: No untouchables. (Getty)

Something I heard today made me laugh out loud. The topic was the Mets’ urgent need for a power bat, to which I can’t disagree. Of course Troy Tulowitzki‘s name came up. It always does. But what was said next is proof most of these guys don’t know what they are talking about.

“The Mets need a shortstop, because they are set everyplace else.”

This is dumb on so many levels, beginning with this – the Mets haven’t had a winning season in six years and despite their hot start there’s no guarantee they will have one this year. That they are 7-12 since their 11-game winning streak is proof this team can’t say it is set. That hot start is a memory.

“Just who are you going to replace?” the voice droned on.

Just who can’t they replace? That’s the better question. After 35 games, the Mets are ninth in the National League with 26 home runs. They are 12th in the league in runs scored with 130. The only player with a batting average higher than .250 in the lineup yesterday was Lucas Duda. Take your pick as to who should be replaced. If the goal is a winning season and the playoffs, everybody should be made available if it improves the team.

After losing four straight to the Cubs, the Mets must beat the Brewers this weekend before the Cardinals come to town. If they lose the Milwaukee series, who can’t see them below .500 by the end of next week, even if Matt Harvey wins his game?

There’s not a player on the team – Harvey included – I wouldn’t trade for the right package. They must get a star already signed to a multi-year deal to make it worthwhile. The often-injured, pricey Tulowitzki is not the answer. There are players, such as Harvey, Noah Syndergaard and Jeurys Familia, I prefer to keep, but entice me. Make me think before I say no.

Juan Lagares? Why not? Duda? Why not? Please don’t tell me they are set in the outfield with Curtis Granderson and Michael Cuddyer. Maybe the Mets have players like Lagares they see locked into their future, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t better players who could help.

When you’re the Mets and haven’t sniffed the playoffs since 2006, can they be that set to where they say they have untouchables?

Nobody expected an 11-game winning streak, but what it did was not serve notice the Mets are contenders, but allowed them a margin for error which is down to one game. If you can’t see below .500, surely you can see them out of first place.

The Mets entered the season hoping for bounce-back years from David Wright, Granderson and Harvey, and for Flores to develop. The Mets entered the season hoping for a lot of things, but how many times do I have to say “hoping is not a strategy?”

Hope is what GM Sandy Alderson built this season around, and it if all goes to hell, it will be Terry Collins who takes the fall. Such is the plan of baseball’s greatest general manager.

There should be no players who are untouchables given the right circumstances. None. Flores and Collins aren’t the only ones who should be concerned about their jobs.

May 14

Numbers Glaring As To How Bad Mets Were In Chicago

On April 23, after the Mets wrapped up their 11th straight victory to move ten games over .500 and build a comfortable eight-game lead over the Washington Nationals, all seemed right in their world.

They won because their starting pitching overcame injuries to David Wright and Travis d’Arnaud; a lack of consistent power from Lucas Duda, Curtis Granderson and Michael Cuddyer; a slumping Daniel Murphy; and defensive flaws up the middle, in particular with shortstop Wilmer Flores.

At the time of their 11-game winning streak, the Mets were playing at a pace that would have resulted in 132 victories. None of us expected them to continue at that rate. Realistically, after six straight losing seasons most of us would take .500, although the buzz number was 90 victories. Today, after losing four straight to the Cubs, they are on pace to win 93 games.

The Mets weren’t as good as they appeared when they won 13 of 16 games, and likely not as bad as they are in going 7-12 since.

Quite simply, the flaws in their game at the start of the season caught up with them, in addition with a poor stretch from Jacob deGrom; a continued lack of power; Juan Lagares’ injury; and cracks in the bullpen bridge to Jeurys Familia.

Collectively, the Mets aren’t hitting, and their pitching was off during the Cubs’ series. Fundamentally, they had four miserable days in a great city.

Overall, their hitters were 2-for-22 with runners in scoring position; stranded 21 runners; grounded into five double plays and struck out 40 times. Only one hitter in today’s game, Duda at .296 is batting over .250.

Their pitchers walked 19 batters and hit four batters during the four games.

The statistics in this series were so glaringly bad to as to poorly the Mets performed. Overall, here are two more: 1) they scored three or fewer runs in 18 of their 35 games, and 2) 11 of their 15 losses were by one or two runs.

In the big picture, the Mets might be considered to be lucky to be where they are, which is 20-15 with a slim one-game lead over Washington.


May 13

May 13, Mets’ Lineup At Cubs

The following is the lineup for the Mets behind Matt Harvey as he hopes to snap a two-game losing streak tonight at Chicago against the Cubs:

Curtis Granderson, RF

Daniel Murphy, 3B

Michael Cuddyer, LF

Lucas Duda, 1B

Wilmer Flores, SS

Kevin Plawecki, C

Kirk Nieuwenhuis, CF

Dilson Herrera, 2B

Matt Harvey, RHP


May 13

Trading Syndergaard Or Matz Not A Good Idea

Less than 24 hours after Noah Syndergaard made his Mets’ debut, the radio call-in shows were buzzing today with talk of trading him or Steven Matz for Troy Tulowitzki, or Addison Russell, or any other hot-shot shortstop.

Personally, I don’t want Tulowitzki. He’s too expensive salary wise and in terms of prospects that would need to be dealt and has a significant injury history.



Here’s another thing, of his career numbers, how much is because of Coors Field? Yes, we’ve seen him hit at Citi Field, but how much of that was against crummy Mets’ pitching?

Syndergaard showed good things last night and I can see why teams would want him, but on this issue I agree with GM Sandy Alderson, I don’t want to give up him or Matz just yet.

There are lots of reasons why the Mets shouldn’t give up Syndergaard, most significantly is the future state of their pitching.

* Matt Harvey has pitched well coming off Tommy John surgery, but for at least the next year the Mets need to be cautious with him. They have said so themselves. Sometimes pitchers hit a wall coming off this surgery.

* Bartolo Colon will be gone after this year and most likely so will Dillon Gee. Won’t the Mets need to replace them?

* The Mets won’t get Zack Wheeler back until next July at least, and nobody knows how he will be then. Without Colon and Wheeler, I’m counting two spots that must be filled for sure at the start of next year.

* Jacob deGrom is off to a slow start, which, if it continues should make us wonder how much last year was a fluke. I like deGrom a lot, but if he continues to struggle somebody must pick up the slack.

* They’ve been trying to trade Jon Niese, who is basically a career .500 pitcher with an injury history.

* And, realistically the 5.1 innings Syndergaard gave the Mets last night isn’t enough to dust off a shelf at Cooperstown just yet. We don’t know how he and/or Matz will perform.

Also, we know the Mets’ offense has been weak and nobody can project when David Wright will return and at what level. And, because the Mets have other issues other than Wilmer Flores, they must hold onto their pitching if they are to compete this year or next.

Other teams aren’t stupid. They won’t trade the Mets a top-flight shortstop in exchange for guys like Niese, or Gee, or Flores. It won’t happen.

Consequently, the idea of trading Syndergaard or Matz isn’t something they should be considering, no matter who is on the other end of the phone line.