Jan 12

Mets Right For Balking On Syndergaard-Desmond Trade

Word is the Mets had a shot at Washington shortstop Ian Desmond, but balked at the trade because it would have cost them Noah Syndergaard.

SYNDERGAARD: Just a start. (MLB.com)

SYNDERGAARD: Don’t deal him. (MLB.com)

Good move on their part. Eventually, the Mets might trade Syndergaard, but now isn’t the time.

Before trading Syndergaard for Desmond, or anybody else for that matter, the Mets must ask themselves this question: Would they be better off?

Desmond does not put the Mets over the top. I’m not saying Wilmer Flores does either, but he deserves the chance to show what he can do with a legitimate opportunity, something he has not been given.

There’s another reason to hold onto Syndergaard, and that’s the current make-up of the rotation. Bartolo Colon is gone after this season. Matt Harvey is coming back from surgery and we don’t know about his status until he gets back on the mound. Zack Wheeler and Jacob deGrom are still in their developmental stages and are largely unproven, despite a high potential upside.

The potential for Syndergaard is also high and I want to see what he really is. If Syndergaard pitches to he projections, he has far more value than Desmond, or Ben Zobrist for that matter.

Sandy Alderson gets ripped here, and elsewhere, for moves he doesn’t make. This isn’t one of them.

Jan 03

Safety Nets Could Be Gone For Collins In 2015

When the New York Mets extended Terry Collins the past few years, they did so with the reasoning of injuries and the inability of the front office to provide him with quality talent.

Collins shouldn’t expect those safety nets if the Mets sputter again this year.

Despite still having general manager Sandy Alderson having an aversion to spending, the Mets have been pointing to this summer because of the return of Matt Harvey.

The thinking in Flushing is a healthy Harvey will push the Mets over .500 for the first time since 2008 when they finished 89-73. Since then, ten teams qualified for the playoffs with at least that record.

In addition to Harvey’s return from elbow surgery, the Mets have issues with Curtis Granderson’s return into a potent offensive force, David Wright coming back from injuries, and their concerns with Juan Lagares and Wilmer Flores becoming full-time players.

There are also questions in the rotation and bullpen, and behind the plate. Those are all important questions, but the Mets don’t seem inclined to throw money at them.

That squarely puts the onus on Collins.

Jan 02

Answers Mets Hope To Get This Season

The New York Mets have more than a few questions that could be answered after this season. How they are will determine the progress of their rebuilding phase, or if they have to start over again.

If these issues are addressed in the positive, next winter could be especially brutal. Sandy Alderson could survive, but it’s doubtful Terry Collins would be extended again.

Here are the players under the most scrutiny:

Matt Harvey: Any pitcher coming off elbow surgery is a concern, but we’re talking about the club’s marquee arm, one whom they are basing their future. If he proves healthy and has a good season, the Mets could entertain thoughts about signing him to a long-term contract to bypass his arbitration years. If he’s not healthy or is re-injured, how can the Mets go into next off-season assuming he’ll come back strong in 2016? Answer: They can’t.

WHEELER: Facing a big year. (AP)

WHEELER: Facing a big year. (AP)

Zack Wheeler: The Mets resisted trade overtures for him in the belief he’ll blossom into a star. That could happen if he learns to improve his control and reduce his pitch count. That would be the next step in his development. If this is a lackluster season and Noah Syndergaard shows something, they might listen, especially if they don’t fill their offensive holes or still have a question at shortstop.

Jon Niese: Often injured and ineffective, teams no longer clamor for him. If he halfway lives up to expectations perhaps that might enhance his trade value and it will be easier to move him. They might be able to do that at the trade deadline if he has a strong first half. If Niese is a bust this season, the Mets will be looking for another left-hander next winter.

Juan Lagares: He’s the Mets’ centerfielder based on a limited window last year. He needs to improve his on-base percentage if he’s to become their leadoff hitter. If he doesn’t make strides in that direction, the Mets could again be looking at a centerfielder and leadoff hitter. Ideally, they would like to fill both voids with the same player. They have a chance to do that with Lagares.

Curtis Granderson: Twenty homers won’t cut it. Another mediocre season will have the Mets looking again and staring at another non-productive long-term contract. Since the Mets aren’t prone to eat lousy contracts, there could be two more years of heavy strikeouts.

David Wright: He hasn’t hit over 25 homers or driven in at least 100 runs since 2010. For the most part, attribute injuries. If he’s healthy and produces mediocre-to-poor numbers, there will be even more grumbling about his contract. I’ve written Wright is the Mets’ most pressing question, even more than Harvey. A bounce-back season will answer a lot of questions.

Wilmer Flores: He enters spring training with the inside track at shortstop. The Mets eschewed several more expensive options the past two years in the hope Flores would answer this question on the cheap. If he doesn’t pan out this year, they just might be forced to pay in the free-agent market or deal one of their young pitchers.

 

Dec 16

Trade Of Gee Won’t Happen Soon

Speaking today at the Mets’ holiday party, GM Sandy Alderson said not to look for anything involving Dillon Gee soon.

“I’d say activity will pick up significantly in January across the board,’’ Alderson said. “That’s probably the likely time frame for us as well.’’

Given that, don’t be surprised if he’s with the team in Port St. Lucie. I wouldn’t even be shocked to see him on the Opening Day roster.

A lifetime 40-34 pitcher with a $5 million contract, and with the Mets making it clear they want to trade him ahead of Jon Niese and Bartolo Colon, his value isn’t that high. And, with the free-agent market still heavy, teams will look there before trading.

Alderson said the Mets are unlikely to bid on South Korean shortstop Jung-Ho Kang, which means there’s a high probability of Opening Day job going to Wilmer Flores.

Dec 15

Would Rather Have Germen Over Mayberry

The Mets made the signing of right-handed hitter John Mayberry Jr., official today and to make room on the 40-man roster they designated for assignment reliever Gonzalez Germen.

Personally, as the San Francisco Giants proved three times over the past five years, bullpen depth is critical for a team’s success, so I would rather have had them keep Germen. To me, a 27-year-old hard-throwing reliever with a fastball in the mid-90s has a greater upside than a 30-year-old with a lifetime .241 batting average and career .305 on-base percentage.

I don’t know what will become of Germen, but Mayberry has proven he’s about as good as he’s going to be. Yes, the Mets need right-handed hitting, but if they won’t spend to get it, then they would stand to have numerous opportunities later.

Speaking of lost opportunities, Houston signed Jed Lowrie to a three-year, $23-million contract. Considering the Mets weren’t willing to go that high in years or dollars, it wasn’t that much of a lost chance.

What this does is only reinforce what I’ve been alluding to for the past month, which is the shortstop’s job belongs to Wilmer Flores.