Oct 06

Leadoff Hitter Remains A Nagging Question

Of all the Mets’ off-season questions, the matter of their leadoff hitter is one of the most intriguing. That is especially if their intent is to fill it from within.

With no budding Lou Brock or Rickey Henderson in their farm system, their best hope is on their current 40-man roster. I say that because there’s no real answer in the free-agent market and they are reluctant to trade their young pitching.

The primary in-house candidates are Eric Young, Juan Lagares, Ruben Tejada, Daniel Murphy and Kirk Nieuwenhuis. All have something they could bring to the table, but all have issues to the negative.

Young, Lagares and Nieuwenhuis have speed, but also rather low on-base percentages and a penchant for striking out too much.

Of the group, Murphy is the best hitter, but for a relatively weak lineup he’s better suited for a run-producing slot in the middle of the order. Also, Murphy’s on-base percentage, at .332, isn’t as lofty as one might think.

If Murphy is still here – a substantial question – he should be hitting between second and sixth.

As for Young, there’s an excellent chance it will be a moot point and not be brought back.

Last winter, manager Terry Collins toyed with the idea of experimenting with Tejada. The catch here is Tejada needs a position to play and that means starting ahead of Wilmer Flores, which isn’t a given.

Mets’ 11 different leadoff hitters ranked last in the majors with a .235 average and paltry a .308 on-base percentage. If they want to change that, they’ll have to hope for a breakout season from the names suggested or be willing to spend.

Sep 17

Collins Blowing Smoke; It’s Flores’ Job To Lose

Terry Collins insists shortstop will be wide open next spring, but what else can he say?

Even after Wilmer Flores homered twice and drove in six runs Tuesday night in a 9-1 rout of the Marlins, and has driven in 10 runs over the last four games, Collins is dancing the politically correct line.

He has to.

FLORES: Should get job. (Getty)

FLORES: Should get job. (Getty)

He can’t give the job to Flores outright, because it will hurt whatever trade value Ruben Tejada might have left. Plus, Flores hasn’t exactly done it all year. What if he regresses?

Flores always had a greater offensive potential than Tejada, with the latter having the better of it defensively. However, one of the biggest surprises this summer has been Flores’ play at shortstop. He doesn’t have great range – that can be made up by better positioning, which he’ll learn – but seems to make most of the plays.

My feeling is Flores would help win more games with his bat than Tejada will with his glove.

Collins has to blow a little smoke because that’s what managers do, but bet on Flores getting the job next year.

Sep 15

Why Not DeGrom Or D’Arnaud For NL Rookie Honors?

Why not Jacob deGrom? Or Travis d’Arnaud?

Usually, the Rookie of the Year Award goes to hitters, as the writers tend to favor offense and the everyday player. When it comes to that, deGrom’s stiffest competition could come from teammate d’Arnaud, who leads NL Rookies with 13 homers and is second with 40 RBI, despite a .243 average in 102 games.

DeGrom: Viable NL Rookie candidate.

DeGrom: Viable NL Rookie candidate.

Had d’Arnaud played the entire season he might he the consensus pick.

Cincinnati’s Billy Hamilton figures to be the other best bet, hitting .259 with six homers and 48 RBI in a league-leading 144 games for NL Rookies. Cubs third baseman Mike Olt has 12 homers and 32 RBI, but with a .154 average.

Hamilton plays center field, while d’Arnaud is a catcher, both difficult positions to break in with considering the defensive responsibilities.

DeGrom, tonight’s starter against Miami at Citi Field, trails Arizona’s Chase Anderson in record, 9-6 to 8-6, but leads him in innings pitched (127.1-109.1) and strikeouts (121-100) and has given up far fewer homers (7-16). As far as pitchers go, it has to be one of the two.

Other Mets under consideration are Wilmer Flores, Eric Campbell and Jeurys Familia.

If a Met wins, he will become the fifth Rookie of the Year in franchise history, joining Tom Seaver (1969), Jon Matlack (1972), Darryl Strawberry (1983) and Dwight Gooden (1984).

So, why not deGrom or d’Arnaud?

Jul 30

How Collins Views Wilmer Flores

terry-collins1

The following transcript is courtesy of Adam Rubin of ESPN New York. It’s a conversation between reporters and Terry Collins at Citi Field regarding Wilmer Flores.

Reporter: ”When you take a look at Wilmer Flores, when he was up here in May, when he played in five consecutive games, he hit. When he plays every other game he doesn’t hit. Is now the time to see what Flores can do on an everyday basis?”

Collins: ”It all depends where you’re going to play him.”

Reporter: ”You don’t have confidence in him at shortstop?”

Collins: ”No, no. I didn’t say that. The other kid [Tejada] is playing pretty good. I don’t know what games you’ve been watching, but we’ve been playing pretty good lately.”

Reporter: ”He’s 3-for-29.”

Collins: ”We’re playing pretty good lately. You know, Ike Davis wasn’t hitting and we were winning games. So you pick and choose your spots. Wilmer came up because Ruben got beaned, so we were concerned about having a backup. So that’s why he’s here. There were no instructions to play him everyday. We’re going to try to get him at-bats. That’s why he’s in there today.”

Reporter: ”What do you need to see from him to keep him in the lineup everyday?”

Collins: ”Nothing from him. We’ve got to figure out if he is going to be the shortstop, or if the other guy is going to be the shortstop.”

During Flores’ first call-up to the Mets, he hit a grand slam and drove in six against the Phillies to win the game. Afterward, Collins said the following about Flores:

“It’s not like he hit it against Cliff Lee.”

After sitting idle for 12 straight days, Collins was asked if that was harmful to Flores’ development. The Mets manager responded:

“I cant worry about developing players, I have games I’ve got to win.”

Last week, when asked if Flores would share time at short with Tejada, the Mets manager said:

“Lets understand that if Tejada didn’t get beaned, Flores is not even here right now. Got it?”

Cripes… Yeah, we got it…