May 25

Last Night’s Meltdown Was On Collins

This one was on Terry Collins. For all the talk about the Mets’ faulty bullpen – and to be sure there aren’t enough quality arms – occasionally the manager has to step up and say, “this was on me.”

Such was the case in last night’s 6-5 loss to the San Diego Padres, a game in which the Mets held a four-run lead.

COLLINS: Bad game. (AP)

COLLINS: Bad game. (AP)

The box score will reveal the Mets used five pitchers from the seventh inning; not quite the formula it wants to use in getting to the closer.

Robert Gsellman had given the Mets a quality outing – three runs in six innings – but Collins wouldn’t let him come out for the seventh, instead, giving the ball to Fernando Salas.

Why? Gsellman was still strong after throwing 84 pitches. Sure, he had been struggling lately, but he appeared to have righted himself. At least it looked that way during his six innings.

“I knew that was going to get brought up,” was Collins’ reply to Gsellman’s pitch count. “This kid has really been struggling. At times, you want him to leave with a good feeling and he gave us six good innings and we just say, ‘Hey, look, he did exactly what we were hoping he’d do tonight to get us to that point.’ ”

Part of me likes Collins’ rationale, but the other part makes me scream: “Enough with the good feelings. Let the precious snowflake try to win the !@#$% game. What’s next, a participation trophy for playing?

At least let him pitch until a runner got on. That should have also been the plan with Salas, who got the first two hitters then unraveled.

A pinch-single, wild pitch and two walks loaded the bases Collins pulled Salas for Neil Ramirez. Why would you keeps s struggling reliever like Salas in long enough to load the bases, with two of the runners by walks?

The Mets had been getting decent production from Jerry Blevins and Paul Sewald, but neither was available having pitched the night before in a 9-3 win. A note: The bullpen was taxed that night before because Matt Harvey couldn’t give the Mets more than five. Incidentally, both Sewald and Blevins pitched with at least a five-run lead.

If you’re going to tinker with your bullpen, why not see what Ramirez can do with a six-run lead instead of with the game on the line?

It was almost a foregone conclusion Wil Myers would tie the game with a two-run single, just missing a grand slam by inches, and Hunter Renfroe would put the Padres ahead with a mammoth homer in the eighth against lefty Josh Smoker.

Why pull Gsellman when he’s throwing well? Why let a lefty pitch to Renfroe? Why save Addison Reed for the ninth when the Mets were losing? All those were questions Collins needed to address. We can point fingers, and rightly so, at GM Sandy Alderson for not providing quality arms in the bullpen, but this was in-game decision making by Collins, and it was bad.

Aug 13

Three Mets’ Storylines: On This Night Lady Luck Smiled

Jacob deGrom gave the Mets the kind of performance Saturday they desperately needed from him as they hoped to snap a four-game losing streak. For a long time it looked as if deGrom would come away with another no-decision when Jeurys Familia coughed up the lead.

However, the Mets manufactured the game-winning run in the 11th when Neil Walker scored on Wilmer Flores’ fielder’s choice grounder up the middle to give them a 3-2 victory over the San Diego Padres.

WALKER: Celebrates. (AP)

WALKER: Celebrates. (AP)

The play was set up by Walker’s hustle as he went from first-to-third on James Loney’s bloop single to left.

“That was a heads up play,” a relieved Mets manager Terry Collins said. “This was a good game for us to win.”

The Mets won it on Flores’ grounder up the middle, but instead of trying for the double play, Padres second baseman Ryan Schimpf tried for the play at the plate.

“I thought it was going to be a double play,” Collins said of his first thoughts after the ball was hit.

For a team that has played in back luck lately, this could be a sign things could turn.

DeGrom was brilliant in his effort to pick up his struggling team and took a 1-0 lead into the seventh, but Yangervis Solarte homered with two outs to tie the game.

DeGrom had to be thinking “here we go again,’’ until Kelly Johnson’s pinch-hit sacrifice fly in the bottom of the inning regained the lead for the Mets.

Addison Reed stuffed the Padres in the eighth, but Wil Myers tied the game with two outs in the ninth on a homer off Familia. It was Familia’s third blown save and the first homer he has given up this year.

The other key storylines from the game were Jose Reyes‘ return and Curtis Granderson‘s continuing struggles.

REYES RETURNS: Reyes came off the disabled list, hit leadoff, and played shortstop. He went 0-for-3 and scored on Walker’s single.

Reyes took second on a wild pitch, and on the same play advanced to third on a wild throw by catcher Christian Bethancourt. The sequence illustrated Reyes’ speed, an element the Mets have lacked.

However, later Reyes struck out with a wild swing, an element we’ve often seen from the Mets, and by him frequently in his first tenure here.

GRANDERSON’S FUNK CONTINUES: There’s no let up in Granderson’s miserable season as he went 0-for-5 with a strikeout.

Overall, he is 10-for-77 with RISP, including 2-for-39 with two outs and RISP.

Prior to the game, Collins said Granderson’s playing time might be cut once Yoenis Cespedes returns.

If things continue like this for Granderson maybe the Mets will consider benching him before.

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