Apr 16

Mets Wrap: Indians Rip Harvey

METS GAME WRAP

Indians 7, Mets 5

Game:  #10  Record:  4-6  Streak: L 1

SUMMARY:  Perfect through four, Matt Harvey couldn’t make it at of the sixth and came away with his third straight loss to open the season. Down 7-1 at one point, the Mets rallied to tease on Yoenis Cespedes’ three-run homer and Neil Walker’s third homer of the season.

KEY MOMENT: When it was apparent Harvey didn’t have it in the sixth following RBI hits by Jason Kipnis and Mike Napoli that made it 4-1, manager Terry Collins stuck with him and the game soon got away.

THUMBS UP:  Curtis Granderson showed breakout signs with a homer and double. … Three more homers from the Mets. They have seven in the two games in Cleveland. … The Mets showed comeback capabilities, but couldn’t finish the deal.

THUMBS DOWN: Harvey gave up five runs on six hits and three walks in 5.2 innings. … Travis d’Arnaud was hit by a pitch and has a bruised left forearm. … Two more strikeouts by Cespedes to give him 16 in just ten games. … Rafael Montero was rocked in relief.

EXTRA INNINGS: Jason deGrom was placed on family emergency leave due to complications with his newborn son, Jaxon. He could be away from the team for up to seven days. He’s expected to throw a 40-pitch bullpen session Sunday and possibly to hitters Tuesday. Eric Campbell was brought up to take his spot on the roster. … Collins said David Wright will get Sunday off. … Don’t expect d’Arnaud to play Sunday.

QUOTEBOOK: “It’s hard to explain. I don’t have an answer for you.” – Collins in response to a question as to why Harvey lost it all of a sudden.

BY THE NUMBERS: 16: Strikeouts by Cespedes already this season. He had two Saturday.

NEXT FOR METS: Steven Matz attempts to rebound from being rocked in his season debut.

ON DECK: Is It Time To Wonder About Harvey?

Please follow me on Twitter.

Apr 16

Mets Place DeGrom On Family Leave List

The Mets placed pitcher Jacob deGrom on the family emergency leave list due to complications with his newborn son.

“I have spoken to him every day,” manager Terry Collins told reporters this afternoon in Cleveland. “He’s where you would expect him to be [mentally]. He’s not sleeping. … We’re all praying and pulling for him.”

DeGrom will be on the list from three to seven days. Eric Campbell was activated to take his spot on the roster.

Collins said deGrom will not pitch Tuesday because of his son’s condition. He will throw a 40-pitch bullpen session Sunday and face hitters Tuesday in Florida.

Please follow me on Twitter.

Apr 15

Don’t Give Credit For Mets’ Power Surge To Collins’ Rant

Let’s not go overboard giving Mets manager Terry Collins’ post-game outburst Wednesday credit for tonight’s power surge. We all expected the Mets would eventually hit. The Mets entered the game with only two homers, but clubbed four in beating the Cleveland Indians, 6-5, Friday night. They also had a season-high 14 hits.

CONFORTO: Homer gets it going for Mets. (AP)

CONFORTO: Homer gets it going for Mets. (AP)

Collins went off after the Mets’ victory over Miami, going after the supposed critics of his team’s effort, but I can’t recall anybody who criticized their effort. What has come under fire was their lack of hitting, but we all figured Curtis Granderson, Yoenis Cespedes, Travis d’Arnaud and Lucas Duda would eventually hit.

It’s an oversimplification to think Collins’ rant is baseball’s version of “win one for the Gipper,’’ because most everybody liked this lineup entering the season.

Michael Conforto, Cespedes, Neil Walker and Alejandro De Aza all homered.

Collins said Wednesday’s game was something “we had to have,’’ which two days later is still odd considering it was just the eighth of the season.

Collins took liberties with Jim Henderson, who, coming off surgery, threw 34 pitches the night before. He also pushed it with Jeurys Familia, who despite being ill, pitched for a third straight game to get a five-out save. He also played David Wright in a day game after a night game, something he said before the season he didn’t want to do.

All smacked of panic. Regardless of GM Sandy Alderson backing Collins, the outcome of the season’s eighth game is not essential.

However, give Collins kudos for moving Conforto up to No. 3 in the order. All too often Collins makes a move that works, only to reverse the next game. Here’s hoping Collins stays with Conforto hitting third and playing De Aza, who homered and doubled.

Please follow me on Twitter.

Apr 15

Major League List: First African American Players By Franchise

On this date in 1947, Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball. All players will wear Robinson’s No. 42 in today’s games.

The following are the first black players for each Major League team. Note: The list does not include those expansion teams (such as the Mets) formed after 1961 when baseball had become fully integrated.

The Mets are in Cleveland today to play the Indians, whose first African-American player was Larry Doby, who followed Robinson by less than three months, but faced the same obstacles. After his retirement, Doby became an executive for the NBA’s New Jersey Nets in 1979.

The List

Dodgers: Robinson, April 15, 1947

Indians: Doby, July 5, 1947

Browns (became Orioles): Hank Thompson, July 17, 1947

Giants: Monte Irvin and Thompson, July 8, 1949 B

Braves: Sam Jethroe, Braves: April 18, 1950

White Sox: Minnie Minoso, May 1, 1951

Athletics: Bob Trice, September 13, 1953

Cubs: Ernie Banks, September 17, 1953

Pirates: Curt Roberts, April 13, 1954

Cardinals: Tom Alston, April 13, 1954

Reds: Nino Escalera and Chuck Harmon, April 17, 1954

Senators (became Twins): Carlos Paula, September 6, 1954

Yankees: Elston Howard, April 14, 1955

Phillies: John Kennedy, April 22, 1957

Tigers: Ozzie Virgil, Sr., June 6, 1958

Red Sox: Pumpsie Green, July 21, 1959

ON DECK: Mets Need To DH Wright In Cleveland

Please follow me on Twitter.

Apr 13

Collins Runs For Mayor Of Panic City

Less than 24 hours after calling the baseball season a marathon, Mets manager Terry Collins decided to run for mayor of Panic City. Moments after his sluggish Mets beat Miami, 2-0, to snap a four-game losing streak, Collins went off in a press conference, calling the victory “a game we had to have.”

COLLINS: Shows panic signs. (AP)

COLLINS: Shows panic signs. (AP)

When the season is less than ten games old, there’s no such thing as a “must win” game. How can there be when there are 154 games left to be played? On Opening Day, I wrote this season would be Collins’ toughest job of his career because it carried with it the weight of expectations.

He has not dealt with this slow start well.

Collins handled the Mets masterfully last season in guiding them to the World Series through the landmines of a key injury to David Wright, the innings-flap concerning Matt Harvey, and nearly a two-month offensive slump. There were other pitfalls, but Collins wouldn’t let his team step into them.

This afternoon he stepped into one himself. It’s not so much admitting he reads and listens to the media and fans, but in conceding it is getting to him. No manager should ever admit to that, especially on April 13.

“I’m worried about the perception there’s no energy here,” Collins told reporters in response to a question why he considered today’s game so important this early in the season. “That’s completely not true. I’m not deaf. I’m not blind. I hear what people are saying. I’ve been hearing that we’re not prepared, that we’re overconfident and it made me sick to my stomach.

“We’re trying. People better understand we’re out to win. We care. We’re going to get this going. We had to send the message that this team is as dedicated this year as it was last year. I thought it was important for our fan base to stay excited. I thought today was a game we had to win. We need to show people we need business.”

That’s why he played Wright in an afternoon game following a night game; why he rode reliever Jim Henderson on the day after he threw 34 pitches; why he used Jeurys Familia for a five-out save. He said he would have done things differently if the Mets were 5-2 going into the game instead of 2-5.

That’s amazing. It is absurd.

Things haven’t gone for the Mets the way we’ve wanted or expected, but we’re eight games into this season. It’s foolish to think they can’t turn things around. Collins has been around long enough to know a hot week can change the outlook of a team.

He said he didn’t want people to have the perception they weren’t prepared. Instead, after Collins’ melt down the perception is one of panic and that’s far worse.

ON DECK: Game wrap

Please follow me on Twitter.