May 21

No Reason To Skip Harvey

Unless Matt Harvey is going on the disabled list, there’s no reason for the Mets to skip his next start, whether it be to move him up to Monday or keep his scheduled Tuesday start.

HARVEY: Stinks right now (AP)

HARVEY: Stinks right now (AP)

So, on the day after Harvey was shelled by Washington – and Terry Collins initially danced around the issue of whether he’d make his next start – the heads-or-tails Mets’ manager said there would be no changes.

It’s good they dropped this silly idea of skipping him.

Collins actually said Harvey might be moved up. That decision should be made this afternoon.

“We dissected every angle there was,” Collins told reporters. “In the end, knowing this guy like we do, he wants to pitch. He wants to fight through it. He doesn’t want to run and hide. He wants to be out there. We’re going to do that. …`We really think he’s got to get back on the horse as fast as he can.”

There’s nothing to be dissected. Unless you don’t want him in the rotation any longer, then he pitches. It’s not all that hard.

This is what annoys me most about Collins. Less than 24 hours earlier, he said there would be no guarantee when Harvey would get back on the mound. That’s what he should have said from the beginning. If you have the faith in Harvey you claim, then you don’t screw around with guessing games and send him out there.

Unless Harvey is hurt – and don’t forget he hid his original injury, so it wouldn’t be a shock if that’s again the case – he needs to stay on schedule. Deviating shows a lack of confidence in him, and if that’s true, then send him to the minors to work out his problems.

Harvey shouldn’t be immune to the treatment other players get. His 28-24 lifetime record says he hasn’t been all that special.

The only way Harvey pulls out of this funk is to keep pitching. If he doesn’t pull out of it, then maybe Harvey isn’t all that good in the first place.

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May 16

Mets Should Skip Matz Against Nats

Steven Matz’s sore left forearm will be examined today, if it hasn’t already, at The Hospital of Special Surgery. If he gets a good review, he’ll throw off the mound Tuesday and possibly pitch Wednesday or Thursday.

I’m guessing Wednesday, because unless there is something wrong with him, I don’t see manager Terry Collins bumping Matt Harvey. Harvey is a basket case now and there’s no telling what demons would pop into his head if he’s skipped against the Nationals. If anything, after Harvey’s last start, he must get back on the mound. The last thing the Mets need with Harvey is for him to think more than he’s already doing.

MATZ: No need to rush. (AP)

MATZ: No need to rush. (AP)

I don’t see the urgency for Collins to juggle his rotation for the Washington series, regardless of what happened in Denver. The Mets are 1.5 games out of first place, and even if Washington sweeps them that leaves them 4.5 games behind with 16 games remaining against the Nationals to be played over 121 games with over four months to go in the season.

There’s plenty of time.

Frankly, juggling the rotation for one Matz start against Washington smacks of panic. The Mets had a plan with their pitching that until the weekend had them in first place, so there’s no reason to deviate now. Although Colon and Harvey were hit hard in their last starts, the problem is the offense.

The Mets are coming off a 4-7 trip, including being swept in Colorado. They scored 32 runs during the 11 games (2.9 average per game), and scored less than three runs six times. They were shutout twice.

They are playing poorly and this isn’t the best time to face the Nationals regardless of whom the Mets start. This series won’t make or break the season, but that’s the impression the Mets are giving by pushing Matz. If this is that crucial a series they should have skipped Jacob deGrom Sunday, or bring him back on three days rest.

If you recall, Harvey’s problem first stemmed with a sore forearm he tried to pitch through. The best option would be to continue with Colon and Harvey, skip Matz and go through the rotation one more time before going with him. They should put Matz on the disabled list, backdated to May 11, the day after his last start, and re-insert him into the rotation on May 25, which coincidentally enough, is at Washington.

The Mets played short since Matz’s injury, and putting him on the disabled list would enable them to add a bench player, preferably, one who can hit.

Matz needs to rest and take his time with this. The Mets don’t need Matz this week, they need to score some runs.

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May 13

Mets Considering Pushing Matz Up

Terry Collins reminds me of the weekend griller who can’t help poking at the coals – whether they need it or not. The Mets’ manager told reporters in Denver Friday they might bring left-hander Steven Matz prior to his next turn.

Matz will be skipped Saturday against the Rockies because of a sore forearm, which would put his next start Thursday against Washington.

As of now, Noah Syndergaard, Bartolo Colon and Matt Harvey are scheduled to start against the Nationals from Tuesday through Thursday. The Nationals are scheduled to go with Max Scherzer, Gio Gonzalez and either Stephen Strasburg or Tanner Roark.

The Mets would clearly not skip Syndergaard or Harvey, but wbump Colon.

Yes, it’s Washington and the teams enter Friday’s schedule tied for first place in the NL East, with today’s game being the 35th of the season for the Mets. The speculated Matz start would be the 40th game of the season, or 25 percent into the schedule.

Is one game that important?

The division could boil down to one game, but for Collins to juggle his rotation this early in the season smacks of panic to me. All games are important, but it is way too early for this kind of move.  Even if Matz wasn’t nursing an injury, altering the rotation wouldn’t be a good move.

From his batting order to moving Michael Conforto around, Collins can’t resist poking the coals. Now, it’s the rotation.

It’s not even the middle of May and we’re already talking about the Mets screwing around with their rotation, placing ultra importance on a single game. Maybe if the Mets had Matz examined in Los Angeles, or sent him home early to be checked, I’d think differently, but the plan is for doctors to look at him on Monday.

Why is there such a rush to pitch Matz? The Mets won’t win the pennant in May, but their chances of winning could be compromised if they push the envelope and he’s re-injured.

Yes, when it comes to pitcher’s arms I am ultra conservative. I just wish Collins and the Mets were, also. That approach would serve them well.

But, they don’t and Collins keeps fooling around with the coals. That’s how you get burned.

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May 13

Mets Wrap: Kershaw Dominates

KERSHAW: The best. (AP)

KERSHAW: The best. (AP)

The future is promising for the Mets’ core of young arms. If any of them can approach what the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw has done, they also can be called special.

Kershaw, making his 250th career start, struck out 13 Mets and gave up just three hits in Thursday night’s 5-0 blanking of the Mets.

Kershaw, now 5-1, has posted double-digit strikeouts in his last five starts. Just as important as strikeouts, if not even more vital, is he’s only walked four hitters all season.

“Walking guys is how you get in trouble,” Kershaw told reporters. “I’d rather string hits together and make them swing the bats to beat me. That’s always my mentality.

“`Fortunately, I feel like my mechanics have felt pretty solid the whole season and I’m able to repeat pitches pretty consistently.”

After watching Kershaw, one could only hope Matt Harvey – Friday’s starter in Colorado – was taking notes.

METS GAME WRAP

Game: #34   Record: 21-13   Streak: L 1

Standings: Tied First, NL East

Runs: 137     Average per game: 4.3    Times scoring 3 runs or less: 14

SUMMARY:  Kershaw struck out 13 and gave up three hits, and the Dodgers scored five runs in the first two innings and coasted from there. The Mets never had as many as two runners on base in any inning.

KEY MOMENT:  For all practical purposes, the game was over with Yasmani Grandal’s three-run homer in the first.

THUMBS UP:  Two hits by Asdrubal Cabrera and a double by Curtis Granderson accounted for the offense. … Three shutout innings with three strikeouts by Sean Gilmartin.

THUMBS DOWN:  Thirteen strikeouts. … Bartolo Colon gave up five runs in five innings. … Chase Utley homered.

EXTRA INNINGS:  Wilmer Flores (hamstring) was placed on the disabled list. … Utley is 10-for-20 with a homer lifetime against Colon.

QUOTEBOOK:  “He never gives in. He doesn’t have to stay in the zone to get you out. He’s so dominant.’’ – Mets manager Terry Collins on Kershaw.

BY THE NUMBERS: 4: Times Mets have been shutout this year.

NEXT FOR METS: Harvey starts Friday at Colorado.

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May 12

Are Mets On Verge Of Blunder With Matz?

When it comes to the Mets and injuries ALWAYS bet the over.

The latest is Steven Matz‘s sore forearm and the Mets’ apparent lack of urgency to do something. When will these people learn? Will they ever learn?

MATZ: Hello. Anybody home. (AP)

MATZ: Hello. Anybody home. (AP)

Matz pitched six quality innings against the Dodgers Monday, but needed 98 pitches to do so. That’s way too many and could explain – in part – why he’ll miss Saturday’s start in Colorado.

After the game, Matz said he pitched with a sore forearm, which he evidently hid from manager Terry Collins and pitching coach Dan Warthen. It was obvious with the pitch count Matz was having some trouble.

“It was pretty sore,” Matz told reporters. “I was still able to throw, but it was enough concern for me to say something to the trainers and just kind of tell them what was going on. Before I see the doctors, they just want to play it safe.”

Presumably, had Matz said something to the trainers during the game they would have said something to Collins. You would like to think so, anyway.

Matz has already had Tommy John surgery. Shouldn’t he be smart enough to say something when he’s hurting? The Mets don’t need any heroes; they need healthy arms.

Then, there is the Mets’ puzzling response or lack of a substantive one. Matt Harvey pitched through a sore forearm in 2013 and look what happened to him. Don’t these guys talk to each other?

Stephen Strasburg signed a $175-million contract this week. If Matz keeps pitching as he has, someday he could earn that kind of deal. However, if he keeps making foolish decisions with his arm, his value might not be more than $1.75.

Matz won’t pitch Saturday and will be replaced by Logan Verrett. Matz didn’t throw Wednesday, but could try to throw today. The Mets are in Los Angeles, which has hundreds of accomplished orthopedic specialists. Couldn’t the Mets – through the Dodgers – arranged for an exam and MRI? How hard would that have been?

Reportedly, Matz won’t be examined until the Mets return home Monday. I understand back-dating to place a player on the disabled list, but the Mets constantly delay making these appointments.

Why?

It shows a haphazard, lazy response. GM Sandy Alderson isn’t, but that’s the perception. When Alderson was hired, COO Jeff Wilpon promised an overhaul would be made of the Mets’ medical practices.

From Jose Reyes to David Wright, from Carlos Beltran to Ryan Church, from Ike Davis to Harvey, the Mets have misdiagnosed and mishandled numerous injuries.

If nothing else, why didn’t they learn from Matz last year, when a strained lat muscle landed him on the disabled list for a couple of months?

Collins said – and apparently with a straight face – the Mets are being cautious with Matz because of last year. Matz felt discomfort after his major league debut, yet made his next start. Then came the disabled list.

“Last year I tried to pitch through it and ended up missing two months,” Matz told reporters. “So it’s better to play it safe and give it the rest when I need it.”

Rest plus anti-inflammatories, which is another way of saying, “take two aspirins and call me in the morning.”

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