Mar 12

Edgin Facing Surgery; Lefty Pen Void Critical

Mets GM Sandy Alderson said treating Josh Edgin’s left elbow isn’t a black and white decision, but that’s clearly not the case.

“It’s not a black-and-white situation,’’ Alderson told reporters Thursday morning. “There’s a certain amount of gray area that requires some judgment on the physician’s part as well as Josh deciding exactly how he wants to approach it. … The question is whether this condition can be managed over time. That’s where we are.’’

EDGIN: Facing season-ending surgery. (AP)

EDGIN: Facing season-ending surgery. (AP)

Not true. Based on the reported information, if Edgin wants to continue his career Tommy John surgery is the only option. Managing over time? Well, that’s when Edgin will make the decision, and even Alderson said it must be made by the end of the month as to not impact next year.

Yes, time is of the essence.

Edgin will first confer with a doctor – this would be a second opinion – then talk with teammates Matt Harvey and Jacob deGrom, both of whom have had the surgery.

Alderson said there’s no harm in first trying rest and rehab for two weeks, but that won’t repair a stretched ligament by itself. The pain could subside, but eventually it will resurface, and who is to say there might not be more damage, like the ligament snapping?

The gamble is how long can Edgin pitch without blowing out the elbow entirely?

If anybody suggests this isn’t a big deal, they would be wrong. I’m not a doctor, but this much I know, things like this don’t repair themselves.

What is clear regardless of how Edgin decides, is he won’t be on the Opening Day roster, whether he opts to rest or have surgery, and the Mets have a huge void to fill. The internal options are Scott Rice, Rule 5 pick Sean Gilmartin, Dario Alvarez and Jack Leathersich, with Duane Below and Darin Gorski in the minor league camp.

They could also wait until the end of spring training and hope somebody who has been released.

They also have prospect Steven Matz, whom they refuse to try in that role even though he has the best stuff of any of them.

All of this means the Mets must make a deal. Remember Alderson’s talk about being capable of winning 90 games and possibly contending? Well, that possibility is gone without a left reliever.

If the Mets are as good as they claim, then it is time to show it and make a deal.

Now.

ON DECK: Today’s game and lineups.

Mar 11

Parnell Has Strained Hamstring

Mets closer Bobby Parnell remains sidelined. It was hoped Parnell, who is recovering from Tommy John surgery, would return to the mound Wednesday.

That return has been delayed indefinitely with a strained left hamstring.

Caution is the approach, is what pitching coach Dan Warthen told reporters: “He’s got a little bit of a strain of a hamstring, and we don’t want to take any chances.’’

The Mets expect Parnell to open the season on the disabled list.

ON DECK: Mets Matters: Notebook.

Mar 09

Wheeler “Must See” Met

So far, Mets’ starting pitchers have done well in their exhibition starts. Zack Wheeler is up next scheduled Monday afternoon against Miami at Tradition Field (1:10 p.m., SNY). Of all Mets pitchers, Wheeler is the one I am most intrigued with as he could have the biggest upside this summer.

WHEELER: Faces Marlins today.

WHEELER: Faces Marlins today.

Coming off Tommy John surgery, Matt Harvey could have understandable issues; it would be interesting to see if 2014 Rookie of the Year Jacob deGrom can have an encore season; Jon Niese can be an enigma; and Bartolo Colon is 41.

That leaves Wheeler, who was 11-11 with a 3.54 ERA last year and threw 185.1 innings. Wheeler averages nine strikeouts per nine innings, which is ace worthy. However, his four walks per nine innings is something that must be reduced – by at least half.

Depending on whom you talk with, Wheeler’s stuff might be better than Harvey’s. Command is a different issue.

Wheeler must improve his control, and doing so would enable him to work deeper into games. In 32 starts last year, Wheeler worked into the seventh only 13 times. He also reached 100 pitches 24 times and 110 pitches 13 times.

That doesn’t seem like much, but there’s an accumulative effect on the arm when you factor what he throws in the bullpen between starts; the eight warm-ups between innings; and the 50 or more warm-ups before the game.

After April he did not throw less than 100 pitches in consecutive starts. That must change to not only preserve his arm, but he could add an inning a start that would also reduce the workload of the bullpen.

There are progressions in the development from a prospect to a quality starter. Wheeler has already shown he can be overpowering. Now he must prove he can dominate with his control.

If he does that, there’s no telling how good he can become.

 

Mar 08

Darvish Injury Shows Fragility Of Pitching … And Value Of Gee

This is how it will happen if Dillon Gee is traded: A starter will go down in another camp and if that team is thin in minor league pitching talent, it might not have another choice to deal with the Mets.

Multiple media sources, including ESPN New York, say the Texas Rangers aren’t interested in Gee.

GEE: Valuable. (AP)

GEE: Valuable. (AP)

After throwing 2.2 scoreless innings out of the bullpen Saturday against Miami, Gee addressed the possibility of being traded to Texas in the wake of Yu Darvish possibly needing season-ending Tommy John surgery.

“What it boils down to is I don’t make those decisions. I can’t strike a trade with myself,’’ Gee told ESPN. “I did see that [about Darvish]. In my mind all I’m really thinking about is, ‘That sucks for Darvish.’ I mean, he’s a phenomenal pitcher. And I feel sorry for him. It sucks if he’s going to be gone for a year.’’

The Rangers say they have minor league talent comparable to that of Gee. That’s not to say other teams won’t. In that case, GM Sandy Alderson’s phone could ring.

However, Alderson shouldn’t be so willing to eager to get rid of who has been a reliable and productive pitcher. Maybe not ace quality, but a grinder who will usually find a way to give the Mets six innings.

The injury to Matt Harvey two years ago, and Darvish this spring, not to mention how many teams lack starting pitching – anybody look at the Yankees’ rotation lately? – indicate how vulnerable and fragile starting pitching can be.

The Mets have a potentially valuable chip in Gee and shouldn’t be so willing to play it – not when they might need it later.

 

Mar 06

Harvey’s First Impression Of Start

Matt Harvey’s first start coming off Tommy John surgery was a good one with two perfect innings Friday afternoon against Detroit. Harvey struck out three and threw 25 of his prescribed 35 pitches, and finished his session throwing on the side.

HARVEY: Good first start. (AP)

HARVEY: Good first start. (AP)

“I wasn’t nervous. It felt good. … It was great,’’ Harvey said in a SNY interview from the Mets’ dugout. “This was the team I faced when things started crumbling. It is the biggest step so far.’’

Harvey’s last appearance was Aug. 24, 2013, when he was routed by the Tigers. He had surgery two months later.

While there is considerable talk about limiting Harvey this summer – much of it to be determined – he has one idea of his own.

“I think the main thing to work out is in between starts was that I was throwing too hard and too long in bullpens,’’ Harvey said. “The big thing is toning down the bullpens.’’

What Harvey didn’t mention, which I hoped he would, was to be more open about disclosing aches and pains. If you recall, he tried to pitch threw discomfort in his right forearm prior to the 2013 All-Star break.