Apr 25

Was Harvey Showing Off For His Future Team?

As I watched Matt Harvey pitch for the Mets today against the Yankees, I couldn’t help but wonder: Was he showing off for his future bosses? I have little doubt from his body language there’s little question to the matter of showing up his current boss.

Please don’t say Harvey someday toiling for the Yankees has not crossed your mind. How could it not? It definitely must have crossed the minds of GM Sandy Alderson and the Wilpons. If you were to wager a hundred bucks with Titanbet on whether Harvey will be a Met or Yankee when he reaches free agency, seriously, who’d you bet on?

HARVEY: What is going on with him? (AP)

HARVEY: What is going on with him? (AP)

Harvey, who makes no secret he grew up in Connecticut a passionate Yankees fan, was superb in toying with his boyhood team for the better part of 8.2 innings as he gave up two runs on five hits and two walks with seven strikeouts.

However, what tells me Harvey will someday be gone is: 1) his youthful affection for the Yankees, which culminated in being photographed watching Derek Jeter last season from the stands when he was on the disabled list; 2) his attraction, like a moth to a light bulb, to the New York nightlife, which always has the light shining brightest on the Yankees; 3) his agent, Scott Boras, who has a reputation of getting every last dollar, and we all know the Yankees will outspend the Mets; and 4) we’ve never heard him passionately say he wants to finish his career in a Mets’ uniform.

He had a chance today to say something about that, but passed.

And finally, Mets’ management appears to be afraid to challenge their young, stud pitcher, who consistently pushes the envelope on about every issue. He sparred with Alderson as to where he would do his rehab and the issue of wanting to pitch last season.

Despite lip service in spring training, Harvey did nothing to dispel the notion there’s a divide when he refused to give up his start last Sunday despite being ill, and pitching the last month with a sprained ankle (Collins said he didn’t know about it until the middle of last week, which is unfathomable).

Harvey flat out said he didn’t want to give up the start last week and it was obvious he did not like Collins pulling him today. Even after Collins made up his mind, Harvey fought to stay in the game. Then, as he walked into the dugout he could be seen shaking his head.

Finally, in the handshake line after the game, he shook hands with Collins, but breezed past him and didn’t acknowledge what the manager said.

“I didn’t look at the board once to see how many pitches I had,’’ Harvey said, which would make him unique as pitchers always know. “I still felt good, I still felt strong. I thanked them for letting me come out for the ninth.”

The gratitude did not sound convincing.

Collins did all he could after the game to boost up Harvey and gave the impression nothing was wrong, saying he had a limit of 105 pitches. This was despite Collins saying coming out of spring training he’d try to limit him to 90 to 95 pitches. Collins said he chose to leave Harvey in after he left the mound following the eighth inning when the pitcher said, “I want this one.”

Managers often acquiesce to such requests, but usually not those coming off Tommy John surgery.

I appreciate the difficulty of Collins’ position, but fault him and Alderson for not defining a position for Harvey prior to the season. Had they been decisive then, and don’t forget Alderson comes across as knowing it all, this wouldn’t be an issue. Because they didn’t, Harvey’s innings will come to the forefront with every start.

Since Alderson and Collins have no intent to do something definitive with Harvey’s workload, I would have appreciated them not blowing smoke saying they wanted to conserve his innings, especially that for Harvey’s second straight start they didn’t take advantage of pulling him from a blowout victory.

They could have saved two innings last Sunday and three today. That’s five innings – enough for another start – they could have saved for September. Tell me, wouldn’t you rather have Harvey save his bullets now and use them later in a pennant race?

Growing up in Connecticut, Harvey watched Jeter, Paul O’Neill and Bernie Williams involved in pennant races and undoubtedly thought someday of pitching for them in the playoffs.

On this day, at least Harvey was smart enough to not let his past conflict with what’s happening around them today.

“I’m playing for the Mets, that’s who I play for,’’ Harvey said. “I’m a New York Met.’’

One almost expected to hear, “for now.’’

Apr 22

Harvey Will Pitch With Slight Ankle Sprain

Here’s why the New York Mets – despite winning ten straight games – can make you want to beat your head against a cement wall.

The person: Matt Harvey.

The issue: An injury.

The event: Harvey went to see a doctor Wednesday afternoon for consultation on a lingering foot injury.

The diagnosis: The doctors said it was a mild left ankle sprain, but before that manager Terry Collins, who apparently received his medical degree in an online medical school in Guadalajara, Mexico, said, “he’s fine, it’s nothing.’’

Collins also said Harvey pitched with it for a month and will make his start Saturday against the Yankees. After Wednesday’s 3-2 over the Braves, Collins said he didn’t even know about it until two days ago. How is that possible? How does the manager not know his best pitcher has a sprained ankle? For him to admit that is admitting he doesn’t know what is going on with his team.

Incomprehensible.

Collins also said Harvey dismissed the idea of skipping the start. Of course he did, because Harvey is the one who makes those decisions. Collins never should have said Harvey would start prior to the exam, and even after should have said he would see later.

After the game Collins called it mild, but leg injuries are critical to a pitcher because it can alter mechanics and put stress on the arm, not a good thing for someone coming off Tommy John surgery.

How would Collins know it is “nothing?’’ It was obvious something enough to where Harvey had to see a doctor, which, whether it was his decision or somebody else’s, was the proper move.

When it comes to injuries, never trust management’s assertion “it is nothing,’’ and for projected missed time always bet the over.

And, for those who say they are long-time Mets fans, remember this is an area where management hasn’t done well. Don’t believe me?

That’s your choice, but kindly remember David Wright, Ike Davis, Johan Santana, Ryan Church, Harvey, Zack Wheeler, and well, need I say more?

Apr 19

Mets’ Mettle To Be Tested Again

Playoff-caliber teams must overcome adversity and the New York Mets will be tested again.

It was a bad day all around for the Mets despite winning their eighth straight game today, 7-6 over Miami. They not only had bad luck with injuries to Travis d’Arnaud and Jerry Blevins, but also a dose of bad managing.

Let’s start with the bad luck.

D'ARNAUD: Fractured arm. (AP)

D’ARNAUD: Fractured arm. (AP)

It began in the seventh inning when the lefty reliever, Blevins, took a line drive off the bat of Dee Gordon and sustained a fractured left arm. He will be out indefinitely. In the bottom of the inning, Travis d’Arnaud – who was off to a sizzling start – fractured his right hand when he was struck by a fastball from A.J. Ramos. He is also out indefinitely.

As for the bad managing, Matt Harvey was sick, but Terry Collins started him anyway. With his innings carefully monitored this season, here was a perfect opportunity to preserve some of those innings. They gave away a freebie that doesn’t come around often.

If nothing else, Harvey had a 7-1 lead after the fifth. So, why pitch him into the seventh? That made no sense. Collins rested the hot Michael Cuddyer citing the big picture. Why didn’t he apply the same logic with Harvey?

So, where do the Mets go from here?

They have two other lefty relievers in Sean Gilmartin and Alex Torres, but lefty hitters were 0-for-14 against Blevins (who recovered to get Gordon with a glove-hand flip). Hansel Robles will be brought up to replace Blevins. As for d’Arnaud, who is hitting .317 and had two hits before leaving the game, he will be replaced by prospect Kevin Plawecki, who is off to a slow start at Triple-A Las Vegas.

Injuries have already hit the Mets hard, with Zack Wheeler and Josh Edgin lost for the season after Tommy John surgery, and David Wright, Vic Black and Bobby Parnell on the disabled list. Wright is resuming activity, but Black had a setback in a rehab assignment.

The injuries tarnished the Mets’ 10-3 sterling silver start – Detroit is the only other team with double-digit victories – but what is important now is how they respond.

Sometimes, season-defining tests come early.

 

 

Apr 07

Mets’ Mejia Goes On DL; Bullpen In Flux

Who didn’t see this one coming for the Mets?

When Jenrry Mejia ran from the bullpen to the dugout – without stopping at the mound – at the start of the ninth inning Monday, there was no way that could have been good news.

MEJIA: Goes on DL. (AP)

MEJIA: Goes on DL. (AP)

It wasn’t, as a MRI and X-rays showed inflammation at the back of his right elbow, which landed him on the disabled list today (back-dated to Sunday). Replacing Mejia on the roster will be reliever Erik Goeddel, which keeps the pen at eight.

The Mets’ bullpen is in a state of flux, with Jeurys Familia assuming the closer role and Carlos Torres taking over as the eighth-inning set-up reliever. Game situations could dictate otherwise, but prospect Rafael Montero could get the seventh inning.

Montero, who failed to make the team as a starter, will get more work as the seventh-inning reliever than in long relief. That’s a positive decision by manager Terry Collins. Also positive is to go with Familia as the closer than use a closer-by-committee tactic. That rarely works and all too often leaves the relievers confused about their roles.

It has been a miserable spring for the Mets’ bullpen with Bobby Parnell, Josh Edgin, Vic Black and now Mejia on the disabled list. All but Black have had Tommy John surgery.

The Mets expect Parnell back by the end of the month, but there’s no timetable for Black.

 

Apr 07

Sleeping On The Mets: A Lot Of Good, Some Bad In DC

After sleeping on it, there was a lot to like about the Mets’ win yesterday in Washington. Of course, it’s only one game so don’t read too much into anything. After all, does anybody really expect Lucas Duda to drive in 324 runs? Personally, I’d take a third of that.

Even so, here’s what I took from the Mets beating the Nationals, 3-1:

MEJIA: Could be a big loss. (AP)

MEJIA: Could be a big loss. (AP)

THE GOOD

* They won a close game, on the road, against a division opponent that dominated them last season. Yesterday was the type of game the Mets would often lose to the Nationals.

* Bartolo Colon gave up one run in six innings to quell the chatter he shouldn’t have started. I understand giving the young kids a chance, but Colon can still bring it and his age shouldn’t be used against him. The game could have gotten away from the Mets in the first when the Nationals put two on with no outs, but Colon slammed the door. He also pitched out of trouble in the sixth.

* I flat out loved what the bullpen did with three scoreless innings. They overcame losing Jenrry Mejia to get out of the ninth. It won’t be like this every night, but it was fun to watch. Jeurys Familia and Carlos Torres didn’t have great springs, but were sharp. I also liked Jerry Blevins putting down Bryce Harper.

* All too often in recent seasons the Mets failed to capitalize on opportunities, but yesterday took advantage of two Ian Desmond errors to score their three runs. That’s what winning teams do.

* Duda, who missed most of spring training with a strained intercostal muscle, drove in two runs. Duda is benefitting from Kevin Long. His plate patience is good and his stroke on the two-run single was short and compact.

* Travis d’Arnaud‘s triple. There’s a lot of pressure on him to show something at the plate.

* Daniel Murphy committed a throwing error, but moved around all right and didn’t seem bothered by his pulled right hamstring.

THE BAD

* Mejia couldn’t come out for the ninth because of soreness in his throwing elbow and was placed on the disabled list today. He’s already had one Tommy John surgery. Since Bobby Parnell isn’t ready to come off the disabled list, the immediate fallout should have Familia assuming the closer role.

LINGERING ISSUES

* Yes, they won, but I still don’t care for the line-up. Juan Lagares spent most of spring training at the top of the order and it must be confusing for him to be dropped down. I don’t like Collins’ response of protecting him from the top of Washington’s rotation as it gives a message of negativity. But, they won and Curtis Granderson drew two walks leading off so I don’t expect them to change tomorrow. I also don’t like David Wright batting second, something he hadn’t done since 2010.

ON DECK: Mejia goes on disabled list.