May 04

Numbers Say Mets Not “Playing Game The Right Way”

There was praise yesterday for manager Mickey Callaway for being positive while the Mets’ world seemed to be crumbling. However, there’s only so much that positivity can bring to a team that has lost eight of its last 12 games.

Callaway said the Mets “are playing the game the right way,’’ which is a positive, yet inaccurate, concept.

When a struggling Amed Rosario doesn’t run out a pop-up, that’s not playing the game the right way, and it doesn’t have anything to do with the ball landing in foul territory. The ball was only a few feet foul.

And, it’s not just the first time that has happened.

Yoenis Cespedes is another who only hustles when the mood strikes.

As far as Cespedes is concerned, yes, he’s talented, but he’s also on pace to strike out over 250 times. That’s obscene.

The Mets will never sit Cespedes for Brandon Nimmo, who has a much higher on-base percentage and always hustles. What the Mets will do eventually is regret signing Cespedes, who, despite his physical gifts, has several holes in his game that will prevent him from being a truly great player.

Conversely, I don’t believe the Mets will ever regret giving Nimmo more playing time.

As a team, the Mets have struck out 263 times compared to only 116 walks, slightly more than a 2-to-1 ratio. The Mets are ranked 26th with a .231 average and 26th with a .688 OPS. They are also a dismal 20th with 129 runs scored.

The Mets have only one regular, Asdrubal Cabrera, who is hitting over .300 (.327). Nimmo, by the way, is hitting .294 with a .478 on-base percentage. The only other regular hitting over .250 in Todd Frazier at .255.

The strikeouts-to-walks ratios for some of the starters are deplorable. Consider: Cespedes (46-9), Rosario (25-4) and the catching duo of Jose Lobaton and Tomas Nido a combined 23-8.

The pitching, which got off to a good start, has fizzled with a 4.14 ERA and 1.28 WHIP. They are also ranked in the middle in hits, runs and homers given up.

You can make statistics read anything you’d like, but some of the more significant ones are screaming the Mets have some serious problems.

 

Apr 17

Mets Not In Tailspin … Yet

Two losses do not a tailspin make for the Mets, but red flags are waiving. And, if not checked, they have the possibility to derail a season. Let’s take a look at some ugly numbers:

  • The Nationals stole three more bases, and all three runners scored. The final was 5-2, so you do the math. Opposing runners have stolen 21 bases in 22 attempts this season. When the Mets are hitting, it can overshadow that weakness.
  • The Mets went 0-for-9 with runners in scoring position and stranded 11 runners overall. They’ve been leaving a lot of runners on lately and that must change.
  • The strikeouts continue to mount. Mets hitters continue to strike out at an alarming rate. They fanned 12 times tonight. Overall, five Mets starters have more strikeouts than hits: Todd Frazier (17-15), Amed Rosario (16-12), Michael Conforto (12-8), Jay Bruce (13-11) and Yoenis Cespedes (27-13).
  • The starters’ pitch counts continue to be too high for the number of innings worked. Mickey Callaway liked how well Wheeler threw, but 99 pitches over six innings don’t cut it.

Callaway said during spring training that he didn’t care about the Mets’ record, just that they played well. There’s no reason to be concerned about two straight losses. There is a reason, however, to be concerned about how they have played the last two games, even if it wasn’t the Nationals.

Mar 31

Mets Wrap: Small Ball Prevails Again

The Mets hit a couple of homers, but that is the least important thing to take out of their 6-2 victory today over the Cardinals. Instead, focus on how they made things happen on the bases; how Jacob deGrom was effective despite not having his best stuff; and how Mickey Callaway will handle his stressed bullpen tomorrow.

DE GROM: Grinds it out. (AP)

DE GROM: Grinds it out. (AP)

Small ball prevails again: Callaway stressed base running in spring training and the Mets kept the pressure on all day. In the first, Jay Bruce scored from first on Todd Frazier’s two-run double, with Frazier taking third on the throw home. … Then, in the seventh, even more impressive than his homer, was Yoenis Cespedes tagging and taking third on Frazier’s shallow sacrifice fly.

There seems something different about the Mets’ offense. It’s refreshing to see their hustle and patience at the plate.

Of course, it has only been two games.

DeGrom grinds it out: Throwing 101 pitches in 5.2 innings is indicative of deGrom not having his best stuff, in particular, his change-up was off.

“I felt good early on,’’ deGrom said. “But, I thought I was flying open a little bit and it was tough to grip the ball. There are days when you have your best stuff and days you don’t. That’s when you have to bear down.’’

Catcher Travis d’Arnaud, who hit the Mets’ first homer of the season, said deGrom reached another level as evidenced by seven strikeouts.

“He didn’t have his best stuff,’’ d’Arnaud said. “But, he went out and made the pitches when he had to.’’

Not all peachy: These being the Mets, of course, there’s always a glitch. Today it was Anthony Swarzak straining his left oblique muscle, which forced Jeurys Familia to get a four-out save.

Swarzak’s answer as to the severity of the injury illustrated how new he is to the Mets: “I’m not a doctor, so I really don’t know.  We’ll see what happens. Hopefully, this is just a little scare.’’

GM Sandy Alderson never answered an injury-related question in that manner.

It’s likely Swarzak will miss several games – it would be wise not to pitch him in the chilly weather – but could end up on the disabled list.

It will be interesting to see what Callaway does Sunday if faced with a save situation. Familia threw 30 pitches today, but Callaway said early in camp he wasn’t married to having a designated closer.

Given that don’t be surprised if AJ Ramos gets the ball in the ninth.

Feb 06

Frazier Helps Mets Four Ways

Unquestionably, the Mets are better today after reportedly agreeing to terms with third baseman Todd Frazier on a two-year, $17-million deal.

Frazier improves the Mets four ways:

  • He gives them a proven, veteran third baseman for the next two seasons.
  • He alleviates the David Wright issue. There’s no reason to think about him returning now.
  • He allows Asdrubal Cabrera to play second base, which he prefers.
  • He strengthens the bench because it enables them to concentrate on Jose Reyes in a platoon at second and third.

Frazier hit 67 homers in the last two years, but Mets manager Mickey Callaway told The Post there’s more to him than just power.

“He’s a baseball player,’’ Callaway said. “And you know what he did at the end of the season when we were preparing to play the Yankees, he made some adjustments at the plate. He stopped chasing balls.

“He stopped trying to go down there and flick that ball to left, he was laying off balls that he was going after in the past. You look at his average (.213), but that’s going to change if he continues to do what he did the last month of the season.’’

“He’s a great defender. He’s a great baserunner, too. He can really, really run the bases. Every time we’d go into town and played him, our bench coach, who controlled the running game, would come up to me and say, ‘We’ve got to make sure to keep Frazier close at first, he gets that running lead.’ He puts pressure on the other team.’’

Frazier improves the Mets, but does he make them overcome the 22 games needed to reach .500?

Hardly.

Jan 26

Small-Market Brewers Shame Mets

The Milwaukee Brewers have long been regarded as a small-market franchise while the Mets play in the country’s largest market. Yet, events over the past 24 hours paint the two franchises with different brushes: The Brewers as a team that wants to win while the Mets continue to take the cheap way out and give their fans no reason to come out this summer.

In a span of less than two hours last night the Brewers engineered a trade for outfielder Christian Yelich, a budding superstar, and then signed outfielder Lorenzo Cain to the largest free-agent contract of the winter.

Either of those moves separately would have improved the Mets, who yesterday signed Jose Reyes for $2 million to play a utility infield role if they sign either Todd Frazier or Neil Walker or Eduardo Nunez.  Any of those three combined with Reyes won’t substantially elevate the Mets to contending status.

As of now, the Mets can only be projected to finish ahead of Derek Jeter’s dumpster fire in Miami, who had scuttled their team to save money. In addition to the revenue the Marlins will make from the television networks, they will get another $50 million from the sale of MLB Advanced Media.

So, what Jeter is doing is what George Steinbrenner always hated – and something he always accused the Mets of doing – which is pocket the money derived from the networks and revenue sharing and not put it back into improving the team.

The Brewers ponied up four prospects for Yelich and $80 million over five years for Cain, prices that would force GM Sandy Alderson hang up the phone.