Apr 23

Don’t Think We’ll See Mejia Again

Resiliency is a characteristic of a championship caliber team, and so far it defines the 2015 New York Mets.

To date, they have lost for the season Zack Wheeler and Josh Edgin to elbow injuries, and Jenrry Mejia to a drug suspension. They are also without David Wright, Travis d’Arnaud, Vic Black and Bobby Parnell.

A little more than two weeks in and the Mets are on their second catcher and third closer.

There have been a lot of key figures to the Mets’ climb to the top of the NL East, but arguably one of their most important has been Jeurys Familia, who took the closer role from Mejia and by extension, Parnell.

The Mets’ bullpen is minus Parnell, Black, Edgin and Mejia, which are four of the seven they had counted on. Imagine where they might be today without Familia’s seven saves.

When Parnell does return, manager Terry Collins said he won’t immediately return to closing duties, and chances are Mejia will never wear a Mets’ uniform again.

If Mejia’s 80-game suspension isn’t enough to act as a deterrent for those players that choose to find an illegal edge, then perhaps this might be – not only is Mejia suspended, but his career could be over. At least, his one in Flushing.

Apr 22

Harvey Will Pitch With Slight Ankle Sprain

Here’s why the New York Mets – despite winning ten straight games – can make you want to beat your head against a cement wall.

The person: Matt Harvey.

The issue: An injury.

The event: Harvey went to see a doctor Wednesday afternoon for consultation on a lingering foot injury.

The diagnosis: The doctors said it was a mild left ankle sprain, but before that manager Terry Collins, who apparently received his medical degree in an online medical school in Guadalajara, Mexico, said, “he’s fine, it’s nothing.’’

Collins also said Harvey pitched with it for a month and will make his start Saturday against the Yankees. After Wednesday’s 3-2 over the Braves, Collins said he didn’t even know about it until two days ago. How is that possible? How does the manager not know his best pitcher has a sprained ankle? For him to admit that is admitting he doesn’t know what is going on with his team.

Incomprehensible.

Collins also said Harvey dismissed the idea of skipping the start. Of course he did, because Harvey is the one who makes those decisions. Collins never should have said Harvey would start prior to the exam, and even after should have said he would see later.

After the game Collins called it mild, but leg injuries are critical to a pitcher because it can alter mechanics and put stress on the arm, not a good thing for someone coming off Tommy John surgery.

How would Collins know it is “nothing?’’ It was obvious something enough to where Harvey had to see a doctor, which, whether it was his decision or somebody else’s, was the proper move.

When it comes to injuries, never trust management’s assertion “it is nothing,’’ and for projected missed time always bet the over.

And, for those who say they are long-time Mets fans, remember this is an area where management hasn’t done well. Don’t believe me?

That’s your choice, but kindly remember David Wright, Ike Davis, Johan Santana, Ryan Church, Harvey, Zack Wheeler, and well, need I say more?

Apr 20

Harvey Again Calling The Shots

It dawns on me how the New York Mets can prevent Matt Harvey from leaving for another team when he becomes a free agent. I should have thought of this earlier. They should fire Terry Collins and make Harvey a pitcher-manager.

Why not?

HARVEY: Good to  be king. (ESPN).

HARVEY: Good to be king. (ESPN).

After after hearing the details from Sunday’s start, and Harvey’s previous track record, it seems obvious he’s calling the shots.

All spring we heard how the Mets were going to protect Harvey this summer, yet there was no definitive plan orchestrated by GM Sandy Alderson and Collins. We were told they were going to play it by ear and limit his innings.

There was no plan because the Mets didn’t want to rock the boat out of fear of upsetting the dear boy.

So, what happens the first time there was a chance to push him back a start for health reasons? Why of course, they did nothing. They let Harvey pitch when he was sick, thereby blowing a chance to preserve his workload.

As Harvey told the story Sunday: “I woke up. I can’t swallow. At that point, not sleeping and coming to the park. I texted one of the trainers and told him I’m coming in and not feeling great. … The last two days not feeling great and today was the worse. Took some antibiotics. Can’t swallow. Felt weak, rundown.”

Harvey continued: “The last thing I want to do is give up the start.”

Of course, Harvey’s competitive nature is to be admired, but once again his judgment must be questioned, especially since he believes he might has strep throat (according to The Daily News).

If this had been lingering as Harvey said, then it leads to several questions:

* Why wasn’t he sent home Friday or Saturday when it was first coming on?

* If Harvey does have strep throat, why expose him to his teammates, so they might not catch it?

* Since Harvey reportedly called at 7:30 Sunday morning, why wasn’t he told to just stay home?

* Collins reportedly said he didn’t have a contingency plan. How can this be if Harvey had been ailing? Why wasn’t somebody on call from Class AA Binghamton, which isn’t that far away?

* Carlos Torres has been used in a pinch before. Why not this time?

* OK, Harvey wants to pitch, I understand that, but isn’t there anybody in authority with the stones to just say NO to the guy?

* Yes, Harvey got to pitch, but why let him work past the fifth inning, especially since he had a 7-1 lead?

Collins said: “When he called at 7:30 [Sunday], there was a chance he wasn’t going to start. When he got here he said, `Listen, I don’t feel very good, I’m going to pitch and go as far as I can.’ ”

That’s Collins quoting Harvey. One final question, why didn’t Collins act like a manager and tell him to go home?

 

Apr 15

No Fooling Around; Put Wright On DL

They wouldn’t be the New York Mets if they didn’t have adversity. First they opened the season without three key relievers. Then they lose Zack Wheeler to injury and Jenrry Mejia to stupidity.

WRIGHT: Facing DL with hamstring pull. (AP)

WRIGHT: Facing DL with hamstring pull. (AP)

Now they face losing David Wright indefinitely with a pulled right hamstring. Wright is undergoing a MRI this morning and Eric Campbell has already been flown in. Wright will go to the disabled list, but with this type of injury, for how long is anybody’s guess.

They’ve played fast and loose with injuries – including to Wright before – but they can’t afford to screw around this time. Wright needs to go on the DL, and even admitted as such.

Several times Wright – by his own admission – foolishly tried to play through an injury. He tried to test it last night, but left the field quickly.

“`I knew it was something bad,” said manager Terry Collins, who added normally would wrap it up and play the next day.

Not this time and Wright knows it.

In a concession to age and experience, not to mention leadership, Wright said: “The last thing I want to do is go out there and do what I did a couple of years ago, where I feel something, you don’t say anything, you try to play through it and you end up missing a significant amount of time rather than something that’s relatively shorter.”

Wright’s injury exposed the Mets’ thin bench as back-up catcher Anthony Recker played first base.

The Mets also considered using Lucas Duda, but that would have left Recker playing first. They could have also used Daniel Murphy. They had other options, but none of them good.

It was a close game and they were lucky nothing happened. They are obviously exposed and it came close to biting them last night.

GM Sandy Alderson might not like it, but he must put together a conventional roster.

 

 

Apr 14

Note To Mets Fans: Wilpons Not Selling And Stop The Roll Call

Without question, Mets fans are among the most passionate and loyal around. I know that from this blog, from talking to many of you at spring training and at the ballpark.

Their passion was on display yesterday in several forms.

The first was the billboards directed at the Wilpons telling them to sell. That passion came at the cost of $6,000, which prompted manager Terry Collins to say: “You want to spend $6,000? Go feed the homeless.’’

Not the answer you wanted, but you got his attention. That the Wilpons would not comment also tells you they were aware.

However, I assure you being aware and responding the way you want are two different things. They know their fan base is discouraged and frustrated, but they will not sell. They are weathering the storm of the Madoff scandal, and if they didn’t sell then, they won’t sell know. It won’t happen.

They have an idea of how they want to run this team, and it doesn’t include wild spending anymore. What Sandy Alderson has done the past few years is how things will go.

Now, for the other display of passion yesterday, who couldn’t notice the roll call chants from center field?

That must stop. The roll call is a Yankees tradition and yesterday was a cheap imitation. How can any self-respecting Mets fan adopt a Yankees fan tradition?

Mets fans are better than that, so please … no more roll call. Do something original. Do something Metsian. Just don’t imitate the Yankees.