Sep 02

Davis Closing On Hot Roll

Ike Davis has already overcome a lot in his brief major league career, beginning with an injured ankle that forced him to miss most of last year and a bout of Valley Fever which sapped his strength.

However, after a dismal start that had some clamoring for him to be sent to the minor leagues  Davis has rebounded to hit 25 homers with 74 RBI. Thirty could happen but it would take a monster finish to have 100 RBI.

Terry Collins believes not sending him down was a display of confidence by the organization and Davis has reacted.

“I think Ike has responded to the patience the organization had in him at the very start,” Collins said yesterday in Miami. “We all knew he had power. We all know he is a good defender.

“He’s had a very good second half — his power numbers speak for themselves. We need to look at how to get him off to a better start next year so those numbers improve.”

There are several steps in the development of a young player, and for a left-handed hitter, improving against left-handed pitching is a must. I would think Collins would give him as many at-bats as possible against lefties.

Hopefully soon, this will become a non-issue.

 

Aug 30

Gotta Like Terry Collins On Third Place Talk

OK, the Mets can move into third place with a victory this afternoon in Philadelphia. Matt Harvey’s strong performance last night, aided by a Lucas Duda homer, marked the Mets’ fourth victory in a row to give the team a pulse after a lifeless July and August.

Third place?

Big deal, says Terry Collins.

Collins wants .500, which would be difficult, but not impossible being eight games under with 31 to play. It could be done.

“You know, it’s not a goal. I don’t know where that’s coming from,” Collins said about third place. “It’s not a goal. The goal is to play as good as we can for as long as we can. For me, our goal should be to try to get back to .500. That should be our goal. Wherever that puts us at the end of the year, it puts us at the end of the year.

“But, believe me, we are not playing for third place. We’re trying to win as many games as we can. … I don’t want these guys coming in here every day looking at the box score, seeing who is in fourth. That does nothing for me.”

Play as good as they can for as long as they can. At one time, the Mets were eight games over .500. Imagine where the can be had they simply played .500 the last two months. It could have been a fun summer.

The Mets have holes, but how they played in the first half is indicative how what they can do with limited talent if they just play the game the right way.

Collins knows teams will only reach the next level if they play consistently hard and are fundamentally sound. There were too many times over the past two months when the Mets mentally took off too many plays.

It’s a long season, sure. Handling the grind is what defines a playoff caliber team. Those that concentrate and don’t take plays offs are the ones who persevere over the long haul.

I know this next comment is getting off the track a bit, but the long haul is why I hate interleague play and the unbalanced schedule so much. It used to be every team ran the same course, played the same teams, and there was a purity in determining the best over 162 games.

That’s not the case these days with some teams playing easier schedules based on their interleague schedule. The purity of the schedule, plus the limited playoff field is what long separated baseball from the other sports.

Aug 28

Why Wouldn’t Terry Collins’ Job Be Safe?

I read the other day where Terry Collins’ job is not in jeopardy. It never was and it is a no brainer that he’ll be back.

Even under the best of circumstances, just how many games does a manager mean to a team overall? When it comes to strategy, perhaps less than a dozen. Managing is about maintaining chemistry and keeping egos in check. There have been a few cases – Ruben Tejada recently – on not hustling, but for the most part this team has played hard for Collins.

The second half collapse is everybody’s fault, from the players not being good enough to management for providing those players. Collins has literally no options when it comes to his bullpen, he’s lost three of his starters, and the offense has forgotten how to hit over the past three weeks.

When thinks look blackest, as they do now, Collins is always pressing his team to play harder, to work harder, to hustle. That’s the essence of a good manager and why Collins isn’t going anywhere.

Give this team some talent, watch it fail, and then we’ll talk about the manager’s job being in jeopardy.

Aug 26

Ruben Tejada Scolded For Not Hustling

Production comes and goes. It is streaky. What should never be streaky is hustle. No matter the record, no matter the score, a player owes it to himself, his teammates and the paying customers to bust his butt.

That’s what’s so disappointing yesterday about Ruben Tejada, who not only failed to wear an athletic supporter – and being a shortstop of all things – and not running out a grounder.

Terry Collins and David Wright – this is why he should be named captain – reprimanded Tejada, who, in his first season as a starter should be running at all times.

The Mets aren’t going to have a winning record, but it they are ever going to, the culture of losing and apathy must be changed. It has to some degree, but not totally as Tejada proved. Tejada should be benched today to make sure the message sinks in.

There’s never any excuse for not hustling.

 

Aug 18

Time For Mets To Shelve Santana

It is time the Mets care for one of their own. It is time to put the health of one of their players ahead of the possibility of getting a few good games. 

It is time for the Mets to shutdown Johan Santana for the rest of the season. I wrote that several starts ago and Santana has done nothing to refute that reasoning since.

SANTANA: Shut him down. (AP)

After last night’s pasting, Terry Collins said there’s nothing wrong with Santana physically. As manager, he really can’t say anything else. He can’t admit to pitching Santana hurt. But, Collins didn’t come across as believable last night. He came across as someone trying to talk himself out of the inevitable.

Maybe he’s not hurt – at least not yet.

There are three reasons why a pitcher of Santana’s caliber fades so fast: injury, fatigue and losing the skills.

We know from the first half Santana has shown flashes of being the dominant ace the Mets need. We know from the no-hitter he can still be scintillating for an evening.

He hasn’t forgotten how to pitch. 

We also know since the no-hitter he hasn’t been the same.

It is time the Mets remember Santana is coming off a severe shoulder surgery, of which rehab began last December. The calendar says August, but the calendar in Santana’s arm has already recognized a full year plus two months. 

Santana has given us the season’s marquee moment and countless other gems during his tenure with the Mets. He’s helped change the culture. He’s been a leader for the younger players, and not just the pitchers. He’s been a winner in every respect.

Santana has also given us six straight games of allowing at least six runs. It’s a franchise worst stretch as well as a personal one. There’s no bite and little movement on his pitches. He doesn’t challenge hitters inside as he used to. He’s pitching defensive.

He’s been on the disabled list, but with an ankle injury. Did that injury alter his mechanics?

Nobody on the Mets will admit as much, but an alteration can be so subtle it would be hard to notice.

Bobby Ojeda, who should know about such things, said Santana is pitching on fumes. Santana might not be injured now, but seems fatigued and if he keeps going like this an injury is inevitable.

With no playoffs, there’s no reason to keep him going. 

The Mets need to take this decision away from Santana. Sure, he’s a competitor and wants to pitch. He has that mentality, but it is one not conducive to self-preservation. They must realize Santana already exceeded expectations for this year and has nothing left to prove.

The Mets, for Santana’s well being, need to shut him down now as to preserve him for the future. If they don’t, they risk not having him in the future.