Oct 10

Top 10 Disappointments From The Mets 2012 Season

On Monday, me and John Delcos brought you the Top 10 Positives from the Mets 2012 season, and as promised here are our Top 10 Disappointments from the 2012 season in no particular order…

Doing Nothing At Trade Deadline

Kevin Burkhardt said the players looked at the front office’s inaction at the trade deadline as a “kick in the teeth”. The team had begun to slide after losing their closer, their ace and a very effective Dillon Gee as they headed into the break. Up until deadline day, including the day before, Alderson kept telling the media that the Mets were buyers although nothing was done in June or July. On the day of the deadline, Alderson showed up to Citi Field with Jersey Shore’s Snooki. While Snooki took pictures with the players at one end of the dugout before the game, Sandy Alderson was at the other end announcing that the Mets were not buyers because of their poor recent performance. “How can I justify being a buyer in light of how poorly this team is playing?” When reporters quickly caught up with Terry Collins and told him the news, his response was “You’re kidding me right?” – Joe D.

The Poison Bullpen

After spending nearly all of their available resources and making the bullpen their number one priority last Winter, the results are in and the much ballyhooed bullpen overhaul proved to be a colossal failure. The Mets’ pen ranked last in the majors in just about every statistical measure, and their 4.75 ERA was the worst mark in the last two decades for the Mets. The sad part is that the biggest failure, Frank Francisco, will be back at a cost of $6.5 million in 2013. That’s a lot of cash for a team that will only have about $5 million to spend after raises this offseason. – Joe D.

Losing Back-to-Back Series to the Cubs

On June 3, Jon Niese beat the Cardinals to lift the Mets to a season-high eight games over .500. With the Mets playing well and a growing sense of optimism, the Mets couldn’t build on that and at the end of the first half lost consecutive series to the Cubs. To be a contender, a team must beat up on the weak, and that’s the Cubs. Instead of closing the first half on an up note, the Mets lost two of three at home to Chicago in the first-half finale and closed with a sour taste. They would never recover, and lost 11 of 12 coming out of the break and the season was over. – John D.

Excruciating Loss To The Nationals

There was no shortage of disappointing losses this summer, the most gut-wrenching coming July 17 at Washington, 5-4, in 10 innings. Down 2-0 entering the eight, the Mets took the lead on Jordany Valdespin’s three-run pinch homer only to see Bobby Parnell cough up the lead in the bottom of the inning. The Mets regained the lead, 4-3 in the tenth, but Bryce Harper tied it with a triple off Tim Byrdak and scored the game-winning run on Pedro Beato’s wild pitch. Only the Mets. – John D.

The Rotation Disintegrates

The rotation was loaded with questions going into the season, but they quickly lost Mike Pelfrey, who was having a good start reminiscent of how he pitched in 2010. Then Dillon Gee complained of numbness and artery damage was discovered in his shoulder. Finally, Johan Santana went on the DL in July with a sprained ankle, and finally was shut down in late August with a back injury. If not for R.A. Dickey’s remarkable season and Niese taking a step, they would have finished 20-plus games under .500. – John D.

Did They Quit On Terry Collins?

The players denied they quit on manager Terry Collins, but the mere fact he alluded to it gave us that perception. And, perception has a way of becoming reality. There was a disturbing lack of fundamentals in the second half, too many wasted at-bats and absolutely no clutch hitting. The starting pitching, bolstered by innings from Matt Harvey and Chris Young, didn’t pitch poorly, but the bullpen was atrocious. Quit is a strong word, but they couldn’t have played worse if they tried. – John D.

Jason Bay Continues His Slide

In his three seasons with the Mets, Jason Bay has hit 26 homers with 124 RBI. The Mets were hoping he’d average that when they signed him to a four-year, $66-million contract. This year he hit .165 with eight homers, 20 RBI. Miguel Cabrera had months like that this summer. He also contributed a .237 on-base percentage and a .299 slugging percentage. Next season will be Bay’s last with the Mets. Even if he were to have a monster year, the Mets will say good-bye. – John D.

Duda Takes Giant Step Backwards

Sandy Alderson and Terry Collins can continue to rave about Lucas Duda all they want, but the truth is that nobody regressed more in 2012 than Duda. As he enters next season at 27, he has a lot to prove after falling from a slash of .292/.370/.492 in 2011 to a slash of .239/.329/.339 this season. He struck out in more than 25% of his at-bats and as Keith Hernandez pointed out several times in September, Duda had not changed his stance or approach at the plate one bit after he returned from a stint in the minors. But Duda is very cheap and under team control for five more years and the Mets have no other options, so the praise for Duda will continue, but it’s best that you temper your expectations and not buy into the hype. – Joe D.

Outfield Of Screams

Everyone including me loves to rail against the obscene lack of production from the bullpen this season, but leave some of your outrage for the Mets outfield – who accounted for the most woeful production in the majors. Jason Bay (.165 AVG), Andres Torres (.230 AVG) and Lucas Duda (.239 AVG) combined for a .280 On-Base and a .649 OPS. Scott Hairston kept things from being even worse, but with a 2-3 year deal in his future at considerably more money, nobody expects that he will be back. This was one of the worst outfields the Mets have put on the field in over a generation. There’s no help on the way from the minors unless you’re interested in watching some K-New and V-Spin reruns. – Joe D.

Catch The Fever?

Another area of concern is behind the plate where starting catcher Josh Thole was expected to have a breakthrough season after a somewhat sold season in 2011. It never happened and what’s worse, Thole regressed so badly that it may have cost him his job and possibly even a spot on the roster. Mets catchers as a whole ranked in the bottom two in every defensive measure, but hardly made up for it with their bats. Thole batted .234, Mike Nickeas batted .174 until they finally shipped him back to the minors, and newcomer Kelly Shoppach was hardly an improvement batting .203 and striking out in an incredible one-third of his at-bats. – Joe D.

Did we miss anything? I think we pretty much covered the entire gamut.

Sandy Alderson, Paul DePodesta, J.P. Ricciardi and Terry Collins are led by Fred and Jeff Wilpon as they board the Bat Copter, destination unknown.

Oct 08

Ten Positives From The Mets’ 2012 Season

John Delcos and Joe DeCaro have collaborated before on several projects and are contributors to each other’s blogs. We will be working again this offseason beginning with today’s feature on the Top Ten Positives to take away from the Mets’ overall disappointing season. Tomorrow we’ll examine the Top Ten Negatives. So in no particular order we give you our top ten positives you can take away from the 2012 campaign:

Dickey Has Remarkable Season

R.A. Dickey entered the season as one of the more consistent Mets’ starters over the past two years. Maybe he was a No. 3 starter at best, but with a tantalizing knuckleball emerged as the unquestioned Mets’ ace while going 20-6 with a 2.73 ERA, 230 strikeouts and 1.05 WHIP in 233.1 innings. The numbers made for arguably one of the top ten seasons for Mets starter. Dickey also led the NL with five complete games, including consecutive one-hitters in June.-John D.

Wright Holds The Records

Wright is the unquestioned face of the Mets and ends the season as their career hits leader, and first in several other categories. Perhaps, he was the NL’s best player in the first half, but struggled in the second half under the pressures of trying to carry the offense. Wright finished at .306 with 21 homers, 93 RBI, .391 on-base percentage and .492 slugging percentage. GM Sandy Alderson said re-signing him and Dickey were the off-season priorities.-John D.

Tejada Replaces Reyes

One on the key concerns entering the season was whether Ruben Tejada would be able to replace All-Star shortstop. Reyes can be a dynamic offensive presence and a dropoff was to be expected. Tejada played an outstanding shortstop and had three hits in the season finale at Miami to finish at .289 (Reyes finished at .287), giving the Mets more production than they could have expected. Will Tejada surpass Reyes as a player? Probably not. But, did he give them one less thing to worry about this offseason? Yes.- John D.

Madoff Settlement Comes Early

The Bernie Madoff scandal was a black cloud over the franchise for two years and threatened to be so again this year. The Mets’ financial distress was instrumental in the team cutting ties with Reyes and trading Carlos Beltran at last year’s trade deadline. The fear was the possibility of dealing Wright hanging over the team as a storyline in the first half. The Mets received a positive outcome in the Madoff case and won’t have to begin paying for two more years. The Mets still won’t be big spenders this winter, but it could have been a lot worse.-John D.

Harvey Makes Strong First Impression

There was initial debate as to whether Matt Harvey was ready, but he more than dispelled that concern in ten starts where he gave up three runs or less in nine of them and went at least into the sixth in six. Harvey pitched with a guile and poise beyond his years, and statistically was impressive with a 70-26 strikeouts-to-walks ratio and 1.15 WHIP. Harvey was so impressive with his composure that the Mets already penciled him into their 2013 rotation.

Johan’s No-hitter and Whitestone Mike

June 1, 2012 will forever be remembered as the day that New York Mets pitcher Johan Santana tossed the first no-hitter in franchise history. When the Mets ace rallied from a 3-0 count to strike out Cardinals third baseman David Freese to end the game, Met fans everywhere erupted with emotion as 50 years of Mets no-hitter futility had finally come to an end. Santana struck out eight batters as the Mets handily beat St. Louis 8-0, but if not for a spectacular catch in the seventh inning by outfielder Mike Baxter, this story could have had an all too familiar and unhappy ending. However, there was plenty of joy in Mudville on this day.

Scott Hairston Busted Out In 2012

Hairston has produced at a level that far exceeded anything else any Met outfielder did in 2012. His 20 homers ranked third on the team and he enjoyed the most productive season of his nine-year career. With a slugging over .500 and an .803 OPS in just 377 at-bats, he proved to be an absolute steal at his $1.1 million price tag. He’ll fetch a nice payday this Winter and will most likely not be with the Mets, but either way, he provided some nice thrills and some big hits for us in 2012.

Niese Was Very, Very Nice

Some may have questioned the decision to give Niese a five year $25 million dollar extension at the start of the season, but you’ll be hard-pressed to find any doubters now. The Mets’ young left-hander turned in his most solid effort of his career establishing career highs in almost every single pitching category that matters. More importantly than that was the fact he logged a complete season and pitched effectively at the end as he did in the beginning of the season. Niese finished with a 13-9 record and posted an impressive 3.40 ERA and a 1.172 WHIP in 190.2 innings and has entrenched himself as one of the most dependable arms in the front of the rotation.

Ike Davis’ Second Half

It was a tale of two seasons for Ike Davis in 2012. After battling rust from a year-long layoff and suffering the effects of Valley Fever, Davis ended the first half with a slash of .201/.278/.388 in 295 plate appearances. Terry Collins resisted the calls for sending him down to the minors as they had done with Lucas Duda, and Ike rewarded Collins with a huge second half comeback that saw him slug 20 of his 32 home runs while posting an .888 OPS. Davis became an intimidating presence at the plate and his strong finish bodes well for what could truly be a tremendous breakthrough season in 2013. But will that happen in a Mets uniform?

Murphy Proved To Be Capable At Second

Nobody imagined that Daniel Murphy would last the entire season as the Mets everyday second base and yet he did just that while drawing raves from Terry Collins and Sandy Alderson who proclaimed the experiment a success. At the plate Murphy did what he always does and that is hit a ton of doubles (40), make good contact while scoring and driving in a bunch of runs. He finished the season batting .291 and when you compare that to other second baseman in the game, he was in the top third. If nothing else, he makes second base less of an urgent need for now plus increased his trade value to other teams.

Those are the positives as we saw them, and of course there are plenty of negatives as well. We’ll consider those tomorrow.

Oct 02

Mets Matters: Last Look At Dickey As A Met Tonight?

We will get our last look at the best part of this season tonight when R.A. Dickey goes for his 21st victory to make his final Cy Young audition against the Miami Marlins.

It might even be Dickey’s last appearance as a Met if the team deems him to expensive to re-sign and opts to trade him this winter.

The Mets say bringing back David Wright and Dickey are priorities, but if Wright signs first and it is decided they can’t afford Dickey they might not have any other choice.

Whatever happens this winter, it has been a thrill watching Dickey pitch this summer. Every five days he gave the Mets a chance to win, and he did it on the mound with guile and grit, and off the mound with class and humility.

It would be a shame to see him go. There are so few like Dickey these days.

In other Mets Matters:

* CEO Jeff Wilpon and GM Sandy Alderson are with the team in Miami. The Mets say they are optimistic about retaining Wright, but have not announced an off-season timetable or give an indication how much it would cost. For that matter, they haven’t done likewise with Dickey.

Wright indicated he’d like to return, but also left open the possibility of leaving. That’s smart because he doesn’t want to bid against himself.

Wright’s decision to return will not only be money – he said he’s not interested in every last nickel – but what steps the team is willing to take to improve. As of now, all signs point to limited spending.

Wright said he would not negotiate in season in 2013.

 

* Thanks to Joe DeCaro for posting this morning about Terry Collins wanting Mike Pelfrey back. Considering the holes in their staff and potential concerns in the rotation, it could be a smart move. However, Pelfrey will open the season on the disabled list and I don’t expect the Mets to tender him a contract.

* The Mets will make everybody available this off-season in a possible trade. Reportedly, Boston is scouting the Mets in regards to Ike Davis.

It has been reported the Mets could trade Davis, but it comes with the presumption Lucas Duda fill his power void. Since there’s no assurances Duda will develop as the Mets hope, they would need to receive power in return. If that’s the case, why bother? Especially since Davis’ contract is reasonable.

Oct 02

Collins and Warthen Want Front Office To Retain Mike Pelfrey

Terry Collins and Dan Warthen would like the front office to retain Mike Pelfrey next season, according to Adam Rubin of ESPN.

“I know Terry Collins and I are very hopeful that Mike Pelfrey will come back — whether it be in the bullpen or as a starter,” pitching coach Dan Warthen said.

“We’ve always contended that he would be a great closer and just go out there with a power sinker and a split. I think we’d see 95 to 97 mph almost every night. When it comes to cost, we have to find out what we can afford. But I think we would all love to have Mike back.”

Pelfrey was shutdown after three starts in April and finished with a 2.29 ERA and 13 strikeouts in 19 2/3 innings pitched.

He underwent Tommy John Surgery on May 1, and most like will not be ready to pitch off a mound again until June or July. In the meantime he’ll be rehabbing and doing his workout with these exercise programs. It’s still a long road and one that could have setbacks as we’ve seen before on the Mets.

Pelfrey signed a one-year, $5.7 million contract with the Mets to avoid arbitration in January. He is eligible for arbitration again this winter and per MLB rules he cannot be offered less than 80% of his current salary.

He will be non-tendered for sure and become a free agent  who can deal with all 30 teams.

There’s a nice upgrade for us, let’s talk about this for a while.  :-)

Seriously, I had issues with Pelfrey when he was healthy, let alone now. Can we just move on already. If you want to take a trip down memory lane go and see what the Marlins want for Reyes or the Cardinals for Beltran. At least I know we’ll be bringing back stars rather than duds.

Sep 25

Davis Reaches Milestone; Can He Do More?

Ike Davis reached the 30 homer milestone. If R.A. Dickey wins his twentieth on Thursday we can put a wrap on the summer and start thinking about Christmas.

Thirty homers from Davis is impressive, especially considering his first half when he hit 12, but his average was .220. Had he hit at least .250 in the first half that would have been enough contact to raise his homer and run production totals.

Terry Collins and the Mets need to be applauded for sticking with Davis, although it must be conceded they didn’t have many other options considering Lucas Duda wasn’t hitting, either, and there was nobody down below worth bringing up.

The last Mets to hit 30 homers were David Wright – which brings up another issue, we’ll discuss later – and Carlos Delgado in 2008. Home run totals have gone down since MLB started cracking down on PED’s, but Davis is strong enough to where he doesn’t need them.

“It’s a cool milestone, I guess,” Davis told reporters last night. “It’s something you can always tell your kids — you hit 30 homers in the big leagues. But, obviously, if I would have hit 29 this year I still would have been happy with the power numbers, for sure.”

Despite his success, there are still holes in Davis’ offensive game, notably the inability to put two halves together and inconsistency against lefties (only eight of his homers were against left-handers). Davis understands that in order to become a real star he needs to be more consistent throughout the season, and last night was nearly apologetic about his first half.

“The difference is I’m just not awful. The first two and a half months I was terrible,” Davis said. “I felt like I had never played baseball before. I kept saying I’m not going to play this bad forever. I don’t think it’s possible for anyone to do that. You guys can pick up a stick and do better than I did. But I told you there’s better things to come.

“I don’t know if I’ve had the greatest season of all time, but I definitely made myself feel a little better about this season working through stuff and grinding and seeing you can come from pretty far behind and still have a pretty good year.

“I guess everyone kind of goes through something like that. I’m glad, I guess, that I did. It definitely made me a better baseball player. It was mental strength, for sure. But hopefully I don’t do that again.”

There were published reports earlier having the Mets shopping Davis in the offseason. The club is unwilling to comment on them, but two things are for sure: One, considering what the Mets have, he’d be attractive in the trade market, and two, Davis is worth holding on to and building around.