Jul 16

Mets Wrap: What’s Wrong With Matz?

The Mets know what was wrong today with Steven Matz, but what they don’t know is why. Matz gave up seven runs on nine hits in one-plus innings in the worst start of his short career.

After Matz put the Mets in a 7-0 second-inning hole, pitching coach Dan Warthen went to the video tape and reported back to manager Terry Collins that everything was out over the plate.

MATZ: What's wrong? (AP)

MATZ: What’s wrong? (AP)

That told Collins that although Matz was throwing hard, his pitches lacked movement and his location wasn’t there.

“I don’t care how good your stuff is, you can’t do that in this league,’’ Collins said.

The Rockies scored four in the first and three in the second on Nolan Arenado‘s homer.

Matz seemed shell-shocked.

“It all happened so quick, to be honest,’’ Matz said. “The balls were just over the heart of the plate, and they were able to get their barrels to it. I was giving them a chance with where I was missing.

“It’s just not the way you write it up. It’s frustrating, but I’ve got to flush it. I got another start coming up in five days, and I’ve got to prepare for that and try and learn from my mistakes here and just keep going.’’

But, he said something similar after the Cardinals ripped him in his last start prior to the break. Considering, this funk hit Matz all at once, and that he spent the first two months of the season on the disabled list following elbow surgery, possibly he hit a physical wall.

It’s been two bad starts. Will there be a third?

Jul 10

Something Not Right With Cespedes

In analyzing the Mets’ first half, manager Terry Collins said what many of us speculated all along – that Yoenis Cespedes is not playing at full strength.

Was he rushed off the disabled list following his hamstring injury? That seems to be the case as Cespedes looks stagnant at the plate with little to no leg drive, and I’ve forgotten the last time he ran full steam.

CESPEDES: Something isn't right.  (AP)

CESPEDES: Something isn’t right. (AP)

“He is just not getting the barrel to the ball,’’ Collins said. “I can’t explain it. I think it tells you: You miss a lot of time, this is a hard game, especially when everybody else is in shape and you’re trying to get there.

“It tells you the importance of rehabs and all the at-bats, which you try to accumulate on the side, which he had a bunch of in Florida. I tip my hat to him, he couldn’t run, but yet he got at-bats.

“He’s just not hitting. You have to stay healthy. You cannot play this game at 75 percent. The league is too good.’’

There’s so much wrong in what Collins said. One, if Cespedes can’t run, he shouldn’t have been taking at-bats in Florida. So much of hitting is with the legs and if you’re not strong enough to run you’re not strong enough to hit.

And, if Cespedes is only at 75 percent, why isn’t he on the disabled list, or at least rested more often?

Since Cespedes isn’t talking these days, one can only guess what is going on.

I’m thinking he feels obligated to play because of the contract. He pushed himself because with all the time he missed he would feel guilty asking for time off.

Cespedes was hitting the first ten days after coming off the DL, but in his past 11 games is hitting .133 with no extra-base hits over a stretch of 46 plate appearances. Overall, he’s batting .265 with nine homers and only 19 RBI, 17 extra-base hits and only 13 walks with 27 strikeouts. His OPS has steadily declined from .942 in 2015 to .884 last year to .822 this season.

He’s certainly not living up to the $110-million contract the Mets will pay him through 2020.

Cespedes’ build is tightly wound, making him susceptible to muscle pulls and the Mets have not treated him properly. When he was initially injured in late April, instead of going on the 10-day disabled list, he missed three games, then was hurried back to play two games against Atlanta only to blow out the hamstring in the second game.

Cespedes finally went on the DL, April 28 until June 10. When he came back the Mets said they would periodically rest him, but that rest came roughly once a week, which probably wasn’t enough.

But, as the Mets were struggling, what was Cespedes to do, tell Collins he couldn’t play? And, Collins, of course, instead of being proactive, took Cespedes at his word he was fine.

Only he isn’t, and neither are the Mets.

Jul 08

Conforto Activated; Not Starting

Let’s get this straight. The Mets have only one All-Star, Michael Conforto. He was activated from the disabled list today but isn’t starting. This makes no sense to me and screams of one thing. The Mets want him available to play in the All-Star Game, which isn’t a good enough reason.

If you hit, you will play, says Mets manager Terry Collins. Except, of course, unless you’re Yoenis Cespedes. Both Curtis Granderson and Jay Bruce have been hitting. Cespedes has not been.

Assuming the Mets don’t trade either Granderson or Bruce, there will be a logjam in the outfield. Conforto is their future and needs to play, through hot times and slumps. Trading Bruce, who is younger than Granderson and Cespedes, would be a mistake.

This is the Mets’ starting lineup today.

Granderson – CF

Asdrubal Cabrera – 2B

Cespedes – LF

Bruce – RF

T.J. Rivera – 3B

Lucas Duda – 1B

Jose Reyes – SS

Travis d’Arnaud – C

Zack Wheeler – RHP

Jul 07

Conforto Takes BP; Hopes To Play This Weekend

Michael Conforto said his left hand tightened up on him during a rehab game Thursday, but felt good during batting practice today.

CONFORTO: Feeling better. (AP)

CONFORTO: Feeling better. (AP)

Conforto hopes to be activated off the DL Saturday, and if that happens, be able to play in the All-Star Game, Tuesday, in Miami.

“The one spot was kind of toward the back of the hand,’’ Conforto told reporters. “I didn’t feel it today. I think it was something I had to work through, maybe, just some tightness that had to be worked out. I woke up this morning wondering if I was going to be sore or not and I felt great, so we decided we were going to hit and hitting felt good.’’

That the hand tightened isn’t a good sign. What also isn’t a good sign is manager Terry Collins saying he isn’t sure whether Conforto would start Saturday.

If Conforto comes off the DL tomorrow and can’t play for the Mets, then I don’t see how he can play in the All-Star Game. If anything, he should take the break to continue to heal.

Jul 04

Breakfast With The Mets

If we’re up early to watch the Mets, they damn well better be ready to play. And, Collins better be ready to manage his bullpen. … A lot of things have gone wrong for the Mets this season, and one of them is the pitching. Too many walks. Part of that has to be on Dan Warthen, who has been given a pass.

ALDERSON: Has done bad job. (AP)

ALDERSON: Has done bad job. (AP)

GM Sandy Alderson put together the bullpen on the cheap. The pitchers are coached by Warthen and Terry Collins decides when they go into the game. So far, it has been a trifecta of ineptitude. I understand injuries happen, but who decided to let Noah Syndergaard get muscle-bound and let him start without an MRI? That would be Alderson.

After Warthen said Matt Harvey would be full strength until late May/early June, who put him on the Opening Day roster when he should have stayed back for extended spring training? Why, that would be Alderson, too.

While we’re at it, who let Justin Turner and Daniel Murphy walk? Right again. That’s Sandy Alderson.

And who, as Kevin Kernan of the Post recently wrote, passed on drafting Corey Seager and Cody Bellinger? Hmm, could it possibly be Alderson? Right again.

If you think I’m too hard on Alderson, this is just the beginning.

Happy July 4th all. Enjoy the day with your friends and families, and the Mets if you want some agita.