Sep 03

Rosario Out With Bruised Finger; Collins Offers No Details

Amed Rosario is the latest Met to go down, sustaining a bruised right index finger in today’s loss in Houston. Of course, you wouldn’t know that by listening to manager Terry Collins.

He revealed nothing today. He said Rosario hurt his finger, but wouldn’t say how it happened, or when, or what finger it was. He wouldn’t even say what hand was injured.

He’s the manager and doesn’t know any of that information. How can that be? It’s because Collins was following the orders from GM Sandy Alderson, who wants none of that pertinent information known as if the news wouldn’t be found out regardless.

Rosario said through an interpreter that he injured his finger batting in the second game of Saturday’s day-night doubleheader. Evidently, Alderson’s gag order on injuries didn’t reach that far.

Then again, it was pretty difficult to ignore Wilmer Flores’ shattered nose suffered Saturday. The Mets are hopeful Flores can return Tuesday.

Aug 31

Cabrera Remains A Met

It’s ironic the only Met not traded over the past two months was the one who asked to be dealt. Asdrubal Cabrera could still be moved, but wouldn’t be eligible for the playoffs.

Now, Cabrera can’t imagine playing anywhere else, even if it’s with a reduced role.

“I love this team,’’ Cabrera said after today’s 7-2 loss in Cincinnati. “We’ve got good talent now, young guys and they’re learning a little bit. It’s going to be a good team next year if everybody stays healthy.’’

The Mets hold an $8.5-million club option on Cabrera for 2018, and if they bring him back it will in a reserve role at second and third – with only an occasional start at shortstop.

“It’s not what I want, but I’ve got to play where the team needs me,’’ Cabrera said. “I’ll try to do my best at any position.’’

Earlier this season, when Neil Walker was on the disabled list and Jose Reyes said he was more comfortable playing shortstop than third, Cabrera balked at moving to second, and said he wanted to be traded.

“I understood his frustration in the beginning,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “This guy was the shortstop here last year when we went to the playoffs, and he played great. And all of the sudden, you’re asking [him] to move.

“I understand that. He’s a possible free agent. I get it all. He just let his emotions get the best of him. But I knew he could play anywhere.’’

 

Aug 29

Familia, Smith Lone Bright Spots In Rout

There aren’t many positives the Mets can find in a ten-run loss, but here goes: 1) Jeurys Familia was strong in his second game coming off the disabled list, and 2) struggling rookie Dominic Smith drove in two runs on a pair of hits.

FLEXEN: Apologizes for gesture> (AP)

FLEXEN: Apologizes for gesture> (AP)

Hey, I told you there wasn’t much to shout about.

Familia was the most important development with three strikeouts in 1.2 innings. Familia threw 27 pitches, many of them in the mid-to-high 90s.

Regarding next year, should Familia return healthy and Jerry Blevins is brought back, and AJ Ramos and the Mets have potentially a solid back end of the bullpen.

As far as Smith goes, he’ll get his hits. What I’m looking from him this early in his career is to not try to pull everything and to be patient at the plate.

Smith is hitting .183, but with a .206 on-base percentage, marked by only two walks over 80 at-bats.

C’MON REYES, PLAY SMART: The Mets trailed by four runs in the seventh inning and Jose Reyes was on first. So, what did he do?

He was thrown out trying to steal second.

Seriously, Jose? If you’re trying to be a mentor for Amed Rosario, don’t play like you’re brain dead.

ACCOUNTABILILTY: Mets starter Chris Flexen apologized to manager Terry Collins and Reyes after the game for when he threw up his arms after Billy Hamilton’s fly ball over Reyes’ head in the second.

“You can’ do that,’’ Flexen said.

Aug 09

Montero’s Spot In Rotation Not Secure

It is all about pitching for the New York Mets. It is why this season went down the toilet a couple of months ago, and it is why they lost today and why Rafael Montero might not be long for the rotation.

MONTERO: Not getting it done. (AP)

MONTERO: Not getting it done. (AP)

Montero left today’s 5-1 loss to Texas for a pinch-hitter in the third inning after giving up four runs on five hits and three walks, with two of his 87 pitches hitting batters. After Montero fell to 1-8 with a 6.06 ERA, manager Terry Collins was understandably asked whether he would stay in the rotation.

“That’s something that will have to be discussed in the next couple of days,’’ Collins said. “If we don’t [find somebody better] he’ll go back out there.’’

Montero walked three of the eight batters Mets’ pitching issued free passes to. The staff has walked 398 batters, fourth worst in the National League and sixth overall (3.5 per game).

Eighty-seven pitches in three innings meant Montero was working deep into counts to numerous hitters.

“It’s a tough league to pitch in when you get three balls on a hitter,’’ Collins said. “We have not walked people like this in the past. You can’t keep putting runners on base. On this level, you have to throws strikes when you need to. He has got good enough stuff to go after guys.’’

 

 

Aug 05

Granderson: Shows How Valuable He Can Be

I will miss Curtis Granderson if the Mets end up trading him. Watching him today was watching a consummate player. On the day in which he passed through waivers, he gave the Mets a homer, two walks and a stolen base offensively, and made two spectacular catches and threw out a runner on the bases.

Not bad for a day’s work.

GRANDERSON: Would help somebody. (MLB)

GRANDERSON: Would help somebody. (MLB)

Unfortunately for the Mets, it didn’t prevent the Dodgers from winning again, this time, 7-4 on the strength of five home runs.

Granderson has been a stalwart in the Mets’ offense in the four years he’s been here. Today he hit his 15th homer to give him 91 overall with 237 RBI in his four years here.

“Curtis Granderson has been nothing but a professional since the day we signed him,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “Today was another example of what he can do.’’

He’s been doing it since breaking in with the Tigers in 2004, and with the Yankees after being traded following the 2009 season, and with the Mets since he signed a four-year, $60-million contract.

He was signed to give the Mets a power complement to David Wrightthen with Lucas Duda, and finally as a spare part when GM Sandy Alderson signed Yoenis Cespedes and couldn’t trade Jay Bruce.

At 36, the Mets found no takers at the trade deadline, in part because of Alderson’s high demands in a poor market for position players. However, with the Mets not having any intention of bringing him back, they are in position of trying to get whatever they can for him.

What Granderson gave the Mets today he could give to a contender and it might be enough to produce a wild card, and from there, anything could happen.

That’s what Alderson has to sell.