Sep 22

Matz To Miss Friday’s Start; Should Have Surgery Sooner Than Later

I have more a feeling of relief than anything else with today’s news Steven Matz will be scratched from Friday’s start with persistence soreness in his left shoulder.

Good, not because Matz is still hurting. But good in the sense he won’t be pushed any longer, and in the best-case scenario, he can now be shut down and have the surgery on his elbow to treat a bone spur, and if possible, treatment on his shoulder which currently has him on the disabled list with an impingement.

MATZ:  Out for Friday. (AP)

MATZ: Out for Friday. (AP)

“It’s a shoulder, so it will be a few days to quiet down,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “It’s a process. Long toss, bullpen, maybe BP. That’s lot things to do in a short time.’’

So, even if Matz did come back, he wouldn’t be stretched out and would be used out of the bullpen, which presents a different set of questions.

Matz threw a bullpen last weekend, and had a 20-pitch session Wednesday. The Mets hoped he could start Friday against the Phillies, limiting him to 50 pitches and have Gabriel Ynoa follow him. Ynoa will now get the start.

Matz described the feeling in his shoulder as pain that differed normal soreness.

“Right now, I’m experiencing symptoms and go from there,’’ Matz said. “Sitting on the sidelines and not doing anything is not where I want to be.’’

Bringing back Matz was an ambitious idea, but smacked of desperation and similar to their handling of Jacob deGrom it might have been pushing the envelope too hard, too soon.

However, deGrom’s issue was to his elbow, but shoulders are believed to be more complex. Matz has both.

Of the Mets’ vaunted young rotation, Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, deGrom and now Matz will have surgery. And, it is possible Noah Syndergaard could have a procedure on a bone spur.

Since Matz was to have surgery this winter, it should be done as soon as possible to give him more rehab time.

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Sep 21

Mets Must Play Bruce Tonight

There’s little doubt Mets manager Terry Collins made an “uncomfortable” decision last night in sending Eric Campbell to bat for Jay Bruce. Campbell produced a RBI single, but the Mets still lost and Collins has to deal with the fallout, so one can’t really say everything worked out for him, because it didn’t.

BRUCE: He must play. (AP)

BRUCE: He must play. (AP)

In making the call, Collins was saying he had more faith in Campbell, who didn’t have a hit in the major leagues since May, than he did the slumping Bruce.

There’s no disputing Bruce has not produced, but this has nothing to do with “playing in New York,” as the media likes to suggest, but simply a player who is trying too hard to produce for his new team.

Collins wanted to give Bruce a mental health day, but used him as a pinch-hitter, so how can he say the player had time to collect his thoughts and let the rest work for him as it did Neil Walker, earlier.

That’s typical of Collins; he says one thing but does another.

Let’s forget for a moment the dismal numbers, and how Yoenis Cespedes isn’t hitting, either. The bottom line is the Mets traded for Bruce to jumpstart their dismal offense the same way Cespedes did last season. Confidence is a fragile thing and I have no doubt Bruce won’t let this beat him.

It’s clear Collins has lost confidence – even though the Mets are 20-8 and back in the race without Bruce hitting – and if he doesn’t start him tonight, then it is obvious the Mets are writing him off for the next week-and-a-half.

Bruce said all the right things last night, but he made his frustration known. If the Mets have any hope of getting anything from Bruce, he must start and be left alone. You know, give him the same leeway they do Cespedes.

If they don’t they are saying they don’t want them and there’s no return.

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Sep 20

Three Mets’ Storylines: Did They Lose Bruce?

In the end, it came down to this: manager Terry Collins has more confidence in Eric Campbell, a player who hasn’t had a hit since May than he does Jay Bruce, the player whom the Mets hoped would carry them into the playoffs.

BRUCE: Did Mets lose him? (AP)

BRUCE: Did Mets lose him? (AP)

Campbell came through with a RBI pinch-hit single in the eighth, but the Mets still lost, 5-4, to Atlanta Tuesday night, and you have to wonder – as Bruce must, also – that he’ll be of little, or no use, to them in the remaining 11 games.

And, after that, do they see a reason to bring him back next season?

There’s no disputing Bruce has been horrid ohis last 24 games, hitting .167 and .125 with RISP. There’s also no disputing he was leading the National League in RBI with 80 when the trade was made.

A manager has a myriad of tough decisions to make, and with this one was the balance between trying to get a player going and winning the game.

“It’s one of the worst things you can do as a manager is to pinch-hit for a star,” Collins said. “My job is to win the game. … I think he’s extremely frustrated. All he cares about is to be a good teammate and help this team. I sure he’s dumped a lot of pressure on himself.”

Collins said he spoke with Bruce before that inning and told him he would use a pinch-hitter, to which he said the player told him: “You do what you have to do.”

Bruce left the dugout as Campbell came to the plate, which isn’t a good image. But, he was probably thinking he didn’t want to have the cameras focused on him for the rest of the game.

Later, it was clear Bruce wasn’t happy, but he said all the right things.

“It was very difficult,” Bruce said about being pinch-hit for. “It’s the first time I was pinch-hit for. (Actually, it is the ninth time according to ESPN). I always think I’m the best choice, but he’s the manager and it his decision and I respect that.

“Coming over here, it has been tough for me. I’m worried about the team. I have plenty of time later to think about myself but now isn’t the time. I’m ready to play. I’ll be ready every day.”

The thing that bothers me about the decision was not that Collins hit for Bruce, but his inconsistency in his decision-making. There have been too many times when logic dictated he do something, but did the opposite. From leaving Matt Harvey in too long to not resting Yoenis Cespedes, to a half-dozen other things, Collins’ track record is inconsistency.

So, did the Mets lose Bruce?

If Bruce is a man of his word, they didn’t. But, that leads to the question whether the Mets’ lack of confidence reached the point where they don’t want him anymore.

Unquestionably, Collins’ decision on Bruce was the game’s primary storyline. The others were the Mets’ offense and a look at the wild-card race.

OFFENSE STRUGGLES VS. TEHERAN:  Perhaps it is an overstatement to say Julio Teheran owns the Mets, but it wouldn’t be wrong to indicate he’s in their heads.

The Mets managed one run on five hits in seven innings against Teheran. Who knows? Had he stayed in for another inning perhaps the Bruce issue wouldn’t have surfaced.

“He’s good, he’s an All-Star,” Curtis Granderson said. “He has some really good stuff.”

Collectively, the Mets have scored 21 runs over their last eight games. And, with the topic of struggling hitters, Cespedes is hitting .179 over his last ten games and struck out to end the game.

WILD-CARD UPDATE: The loss coupled with St. Louis winning in Colorado dropped the Mets and Cardinals to a tie.

Meanwhile, with Miami winning over the Nationals, the Marlins moved over .500 and remain in wild-card contention. The Mets are in Miami for three games next week.

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Sep 20

Mets Should Go With Ynoa Friday Over Matz

Here it is, Tuesday and Mets manager Terry Collins says he’s undetermined about whether Steven Matz will start Friday against the Phillies.

In his bullpen session over the weekend, reports had his secondary pitches not being sharp. He’s scheduled to throw another 35-pitch bullpen session Wednesday, and if all goes well, the Mets want to throw him out there for Friday – when he won’t throw more than 50 pitches.

MATZ:  Taking reckless gamble with him. (AP)

MATZ: Taking reckless gamble with him. (AP)

In the promo for SNY, Collins asks the media: “Do you think this game is easy to play?” Actually, no, it isn’t easy. I don’t know how to build a watch, but I know how to tell time, and this a gamble the Mets shouldn’t take.

Clearly, based on his last start, Gabriel Ynoa should get the ball.

In his start over the weekend against Minnesota, Ynoa gave up one run on four hits with eight strikeouts in 4.2 innings (76 pitches). In their wildest dreams, the Mets would kill to get that from Matz.

Still, the Mets don’t know what to do.

“It has not been decided,” Collins said today. “The report I got, was when he threw his secondary pitches they need to be refined.”

If he still needs work, he’s not going to get much before Friday. Fifty pitches is enough to fall into a huge hole, and with how the Mets have been hitting recently, it could be too deep, and at this point they can’t afford to give away games.

If Matz gets torched – and even if he doesn’t – they will immediately go to Ynoa, which means they will burn two pitchers.

Since they are coming off a good start from Ynoa, the prudent decision would be to go with him again. If he duplicates the 76 pitches he threw against the Twins, that could be two more innings than what they might get from Matz.

“We’ve got to win games,” Collins said. No kidding. Since that’s the case, this seems like they are making a reckless decision.

This is exactly what occurred with Jacob deGrom, who’ll undergo elbow surgery Friday.

If the Mets are hell bent on using Matz again this year, I’d give him another bullpen after tomorrow and try next week, but in relief, hopefully in a limited pressure situation. With games precious, I wouldn’t want to burn one by gambling with Matz.

Collins is looking undecided in this case, just as he was during the deGrom saga, but it must be understood this isn’t all his doing. He looks bad because he’s out front answering the questions every day, but GM Sandy Alderson is pulling the strings.

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Sep 19

Syndergaard Spits Bit; Owns Responsibility

Let’s put the brakes on this conversation about the Mets having a cupcake schedule, and while we’re at it, Noah Syndergaard being a Cy Young Award candidate. All games are vital at this point, and the last thing the Mets need is for their best pitcher to respond as poorly as Syndergaard did Monday night in a game they had to win – and with him getting an extra day of rest.

SYNDERGAARD: Doesn't have it. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Doesn’t have it. (AP)

“It stings a little bit,” said a dejected Syndergaard. “These last two weeks, every win is critical. It’s a disappointment. I didn’t go out there and get my job done.”

I love that. No excuses. Pointing a finger only at himself.

Syndergaard asked for the day and produced the third-shortest start of his career, giving up five runs on eight hits in 3.2 innings in the 7-3 loss to Atlanta. You knew Syndergaard and the Mets were in trouble with his 35-pitch second inning. He encored that with 29 more in the third. Syndergaard finished with 99, of which 26 were foul balls.

“I lost control of my fastball and couldn’t get my slider over,” said Syndergaard. “Baseball is s funny game. Once you think you have it figured out, it knocks you down.”

After a rough stretch in midseason where his pitch count mounted, Syndergaard had been very good over the past month, giving up four runs in his previous five starts and going 4-1 in his last five decisions.

His location had been better, as was his slider. He was pitching the way an ace is supposed to pitch.

“He’s our guy,” manager Terry Collins said. “Certainly [Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman] have stepped up and done a great job, but you’re going to go into the playoffs looking at Noah Syndergaard as the guy. If there’s a big game to be pitched, he’s the guy you’re going to turn to.”

Syndergaard is lined up to start the wild-card game, as is San Francisco’s Madison Bumgarner, Los Angeles’ Clayton Kershaw and St. Louis’ Carlos Martinez. At this point, all might be slotted ahead of Syndergaard as a Cy Young favorite.

We saw all the foul balls again tonight, an indication he didn’t have sharp movement on his pitches and couldn’t put away hitters.

Collins said Syndergaard was throwing in the high 90s, but again, velocity isn’t nearly as important and movement and location. And, no, nothing was bothering him physically.That wasn’t the case,” Collins said. “He wasn’t making any pitches.”

“That wasn’t the case,” Collins said. “He wasn’t making any pitches.”

With the way the schedule pans out, Syndergaard will get two more starts. He can’t afford to let one more get away.

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