Jul 08

Harvey Made Right Call On Surgery

Mets’ pitcher Matt Harvey unquestionably made the right decision to undergo surgery for treatment of the thorasic outlet syndrome in his pitching shoulder. It was the best option for his pitching and financial future, and to the Mets for the remainder of this season and beyond.

Dr. Robert Thompson is expected to perform the procedure next week in St. Louis. The surgery, which would entail removing one of his ribs, is designed to relieve pressure on the nerves and blood vessels in the space between the neck and shoulder. The increased pressure caused numbness in his arm and fingers.

HARVEY: Made right choice (Getty)

HARVEY: Made right choice (Getty)

Harvey’s options were surgery or a nerve-blocking injection, the latter being a temporary solution with surgery eventually required.

Harvey’s agent, Scott Boras, whose comments last year on the pitcher’s innings limit created a stir, strongly advocated the surgery to ESPN: “The doctors clearly recommended that he have this done, mainly so that he can be ready for ’17.’

“The rehab on this is six months. Now, if there was a small window of a season, you might be able to take a shot. It’s actually Botox, which relaxes the muscles. That’s not a long-term solution. `The only way this is going to be treated appropriately –  and obviously, we don’t want to do anything to affect next year – is to get this surgically taken care of.”

That’s the understandable driving force behind the decision. This was chosen to set up Harvey for his turn at free agency. Had he chosen the injection and gotten through the season, that would be great. But, if it only lasted a few months and he had the surgery later this year, or in the offseason, or next year, all or most of 2017, could be lost. That would leave Harvey with one year to make an impression on his future suitors when he hits the free agent market after the 2018 season.

And, nobody knows how he’ll pitch coming off surgery. If you’re Harvey – not to mention the Mets or any team that would go after him – you want two years to make an impression. That’s why Harvey’s decision is a no-brainer. But, how does losing Harvey help the Mets the rest of this year?

Knowing the Mets won’t have him in the second half enables GM Sandy Alderson to freely pursue another arm before the July 31 trade deadline, even if it jacks up the asking price. That’s preferable to waiting through at least two Harvey starts before hitting the market late, which would increase the price even more.

This also allows manager Terry Collins to determine his rotation now and eliminates the inevitable questioning and excuse making after each of his starts. And, who would want to see Harvey go down for surgery in a September pennant-race game or the playoffs?

Harvey hasn’t pitched well, going 4-10 with a 4.86 ERA in 17 starts, and this ailment is an obvious explanation. Harvey frequently complained about not having his mechanics, but not having feelings in his arm and fingers could explain a change in mechanics.

However, left unanswered is why Harvey hadn’t complained about a lack of feeling before his disastrous start on Monday. Boras’ answer to that question explains both the good, and bad, about Harvey.

His bulldog approach on the mound, for example, his eight innings in Game 5 of the World Series, is to be applauded. It’s the spirit that defines an ace. That’s the good.

But, here’s the bad, as delivered by Boras.

“He’s felt this way since spring training, but he wanted to gut it out, try to do it, until finally, he’s going, ‘Look, I’m just feeling like I don’t feel the baseball the same.’ Once we heard that, I was like, ‘Maybe we have a TOS situation,’ and got him over to Dr. Thompson.”

Sounds plausible, but it underscores the increasingly, maddening, “I’ll do what I feel like” aspect that has defined Harvey’s short career. It also raises the inevitable question of what could have happened had this been discovered a month or two earlier.

If he had surgery in May or June perhaps he could have come back in late August, or September, or even the playoffs.

We’ll never know.

Jul 07

Mets’ Harvey Facing No-Brainer Surgery

For the second time within four years, Mets pitcher Matt Harvey is facing season-ending surgery. However, it should be remembered surgery to treat thoracic outlet syndrome in his right shoulder should not be interpreted to mean it is career ending.

One day after being placed on the 15-day disabled list, Harvey was examined today in St. Louis by Dr. Robert Thompson. This syndrome is when nerves and blood vessels are compressed because of a closure in a passageway through the base of the neck and armpit.

HARVEY: Faces tough choice.  (AP)

HARVEY: Faces tough choice. (AP)

GM Sandy Alderson told reporters today at Cit Field the pressure could be caused by several ways, including muscle build up, contact with the bone and repetitive movement caused by pitching. Alderson said Harvey’s options are two-fold: 1) season-ending surgery which could take four months to recover, and, 2) a nerve-block injection, which is temporary.

Alderson said surgery is likely unavoidable, which makes this a no-brainer of a decision.

“I do believe that surgery is probably inevitable and more a question of timing than anything else,” Alderson said. “So obviously to the extent that we’re backed up for a period of time, it begins potentially to encroach on 2017 as well.”

Alderson said pretty much the same thing in 2013 about Tommy John surgery. Harvey balked, but eventually relented to the obvious choice. Had he chosen surgery immediately, he might have had more time in rehab and consequently the innings limit might have become less of an issue.

Should Harvey choose the injection and makes it through the season, there’s no telling how it would impact his performance. However, if he takes the injection and eventually requires surgery, it could cost him all of 2017. And, with him becoming a free-agent after the 2018 season, that doesn’t leave much time for him to make a positive impression on potential suitors.

Harvey is in his second year following Tommy John, which can sometimes be the most difficult as proven by his 4-10 record and a 4.86 ERA in 17 starts. In Monday’s game he gave up 11 hits in 3.2 innings and avoided defeat by a late rally by the Mets.

After the game, manager Terry Collins said Harvey complained he couldn’t feel the ball.

“Obviously it was happening during the game,” Collins said. “He didn’t say anything until after the game.”

Why Harvey didn’t say anything is anybody’s guess, but falls into line with how he’s handled things in the past. I don’t know what option Harvey will choose about surgery, but based on the information already given, it would be the prudent choice both for his health, comeback and financial future.

As for the Mets, they will be forced to scramble, but with how he’s pitching so far, will they really be missing that much?

Jun 27

Mets Wrap: Blitzed By Nationals

Manager Terry Collins said this was the start of an important two-week stretch for the Mets and they better bring their “A’’ game to the table. Can you imagine what would have happened had they not thought it was important?

Whatever d'Arnaud told him it didn't work. (AP)

Whatever d’Arnaud told him it didn’t work. (AP)

I’m being sarcastic, which is the best way to handle a game like the Mets’ 11-4 loss at Washington.

Noah Syndergaard started despite having a barking elbow from his previous game. Syndergaard clearly didn’t have it, giving up five runs on seven hits and three walks in three innings in which he threw a grueling 71 pitches.

Syndergaard imploded in a five-run third, and again couldn’t hold runners as the Nationals stole five bases against him.

Collins said Syndergaard’s elbow wasn’t an issue. Syndergaard refuted multiple media reports he had a bone spur or bone chips in his elbow.


June 27, 2016, @ Washington

Game: #75          Score:  Nationals 11, Mets 4

Record: 40-35     Streak: L 2

Standings: Third, NL East, four games behind Washington.

Runs: 274    Average: 3.65     Times 3 runs or less: 37

SUMMARY: It unraveled for Syndergaard in a five-run third in which the Nationals stole four bases. It would have been worse had Bryce Harper not had a brain cramp on the bases.

KEY MOMENT:  Anthony Rendon’s two-run single to right in the third completely erased the Mets’ 4-0 lead. You knew it was over then.

THUMBS UP: The Mets had 14 hits, getting two each from Curtis Granderson, Yoenis Cespedes, Wilmer Flores and Brandon Nimmo. Travis d’Arnaud had three hits.

THUMBS DOWN:  The Mets had 14 hits, but scored only four runs. … Syndergaard was all over the place with three walks. … Rumor had it Rene Rivera was to catch Syndergaard to but the brakes on the opponent’s running game. … Reliever Sean Gilmartin gave up five runs on seven hits in two innings.

EXTRA INNINGS:  The Mets began a stretch of playing 11 of 14 games against first-place teams. … The Mets are now 16-16 vs. NL East teams. … The Mets are 11-13 in June.

QUOTEBOOK: “[Syndergaard] threw almost 40 pitches in the third and that was enough. … His velocity was good but his command was off.” – Collins on Syndergaard’s performance. 

BY THE NUMBERS:  6: Stolen bases by the Nationals. Overall, opposing runners have stolen 28 bases in 31 attempts against Syndergaard.

NEXT FOR METS: Matt Harvey will try to get back on track after two mediocre outings.

Please follow me on Twitter

Jun 26

Mets Not Good Enough To Not Hustle

The Mets are a good team, but let’s be clear, they aren’t so good to where they can get away not hustling. Reports are manager Terry Collins gave Alejandro De Aza “an earful,” as The New York Post so eloquently put it for his inexcusable play Saturday night.

De Aza failed to get down a bunt, which is bad enough but compounded his failure by not hustling, and the play was subsequently turned into a double play in the tenth inning.

DE AZA: Not good enough to skate. (AP)

DE AZA: Not good enough to skate. (AP)

“I’ve seen [De Aza] play, and the one thing he is known for is how hard he plays,” Collins told reporters. “But it goes to show you — everybody gets frustrated when they don’t do the job.”

I don’t want to hear it.

Doing your job is to hustle even when you screw up. Getting frustrated is not a viable reason, but an excuse. Not buying it, and I don’t want to hear anything from De Aza saying he thought the ball was caught.

The bottom line is he wasn’t thinking. Or, maybe he could have been thinking since the Mets are a team built on power his mistake would be erased by the long ball. Could that idea have been planted into De Aza’s head by Collins, who says the Mets are a team built on the home run and we don’t bunt, or steal, or hit-and-run?

What I haven’t heard is whether Collins gave Yoenis Cespedes an earful for not hustling in consecutive games and getting caught on the bases. He won’t because Cespedes is supposedly a big star and big stars in all sports are given a long leash when is comes to not hustling.

On Friday, Cespedes was picked off first when he didn’t dive trying to get back to the bag and twisted his ankle. Last night, he was thrown out at second standing up. Go figure. The FOX announcers suggested Cespedes didn’t slide because of his ankle, which is unbelievably lame on several counts.

First, slide headfirst which is what everybody does these days. Second, if his ankle is so bad he shouldn’t have played. They could have delayed sending Michael Conforto down for a day. Or they could have played Matt Reynolds as they did earlier in the week. Or Kelly Johnson, who cleaned up for De Aza with a pinch-hit homer in the 11th inning.

Players play hurt all the time, but if the pain prevents him from doing his job, perhaps he shouldn’t be in the lineup and spend a couple of weeks on the disabled list on the mend. Cespedes’ sore hip was an explanation for why he didn’t slide earlier this year.

Speculation is De Aza will be gone when Jose Reyes is brought up. That’s a logical assumption. Also logical to conclude is Cespedes will be gone after this season when he opts out. Maybe that went into Collins’ thinking for not airing out his center fielder.

Whatever the reasons for not hustling by either player and Collins presumably letting Cespedes skate, they aren’t good enough.

And, the Mets aren’t good enough to get away with not hustling.

Jun 24

Mets Fans Must Remember He’s Not Reyes Of Old

By game time Saturday, expect the Mets to have re-signed Jose Reyes, who was placed on outright release waivers by the Rockies on Thursday. Some team could sign Reyes before the Saturday’s 1 p.m., deadline, but doing so would put it on the hook for the $39 million owed him. We can safely assume the Mets wouldn’t be that team.

REYES: On verge of coming back. (AP)

REYES: On verge of coming back. (AP)

The Mets plan to use Reyes at third and possibly give him some time in the outfield, manager Terry Collins told reporters in Atlanta.

“We took Matt Reynolds and put him out there with no experience at all,” Collins said of using Reynolds in the outfield on Wednesday. “This guy is as good an athlete as certainly Matt is. He’s got the arm. He’s got the foot speed for it. These are just things we’re tossing around.”

The Mets will likely use Reyes in the leadoff role and drop Curtis Granderson to the middle of the order where he’d hit back-to-back with Yoenis Cespedes. The idea is to put speed at the top of the order, although Reyes isn’t the base stealer he used to be.

Of course, he would back up Asdrubal Cabrera at shortstop when he needs a day off. Of course, before Reyes plays anywhere, he might go to Triple-A Las Vegas since he hasn’t played in a game since June 12.

In speaking about Reyes, Collins spoke in the past tense.

“He was a great player,” Collins said. “I haven’t seen him in recent years, but he did a lot of things. He was a good hitter. He could fly. He’s got a great arm. He played very good shortstop. He brought a lot to the party.

“One of the things that probably caught my imagination was his joy of playing in New York. He loved it. That’s why he moved there. He loved being there. He loved playing in New York. It’s a tough place, because you’re going to have some bad times and some bad days. …  In my time around him, he was a joy to be around. I just hope if it works out that he’s that same guy.”

Well, he’s not, and that’s something Mets’ fans should understand. In his prime, Reyes was a batting champion and a prolific base stealer. He’s not that player any more, but he hasn’t lost all his skills. He can still fill a void and help a team like the Mets who are in need of an of an offensive jumpstart.

Reyes can help, but we should be guarded in our thinking of how much.