Sep 03

METS CHAT ROOM: Game #134; Dimensions to stay the same.

CHAT ROOM

CHAT ROOM

Reportedly, the dimensions at Citi Field will remain the same next year, probably to the dismay of National League hitters everywhere, including those in the first base dugout. The Daily News reported GM Omar Minaya and manager Jerry Manuel recommended the status quo.

And, it shouldn’t, because if you’re going to tailor a stadium, it better be in favor of pitching.

According to hittrackeronline.com, Citi Field averages 1.67 home runs per game, 11th out of the 16 National League stadiums. Shea Stadium averaged 2.15 home runs per game in 2008. A significant explanation has to be the injuries to Carlos Delgado and Carlos Beltran, and David Wright’s horrendous power slump. The Mets enter today’s game at Colorado last in the major leagues with 77 home runs.

Said Wright: “I would say it’s probably built the opposite than for me. I think one of my strengths is driving the ball to right field. I sometimes think I have to hit it twice to get it out there. It is what it is. It’s not something I’m going to complain about or anybody else should complain about. It’s the park and we have to adapt.”

Greg Rybarczyk/Hit Tracker

Greg Rybarczyk/Hit Tracker


Shea Stadium was 378 feet in right center; Citi Field ranges from 378 to 415 feet in that area. Left center at Citi Field ranges from 364 to 384 feet, but features a 15-foot wall. Some hitters, such as Jeff Francoeur, thinks a normal sized wall would be fine.

In keeping the dimensions the same, at least for 2010, the Mets aren’t making a panic move based on one season. The injuries along with the unseasonable weather for much of the first half had to contribute to the fall off in power. As the season progressed, power numbers did spike.

In the long run, it is better to have a pitcher friendly part than a hitter friendly site such as Coors Field, where the Mets are playing today. If a franchise builds it team on pitching, defense and speed, it has a better chance of winning than a team built solely on power, such as the old Red Sox and Cubs teams in Fenway Park and Wrigley Field, respectively. As much as a launching pad old Yankee Stadium was, it was deeper in left and center, and those teams were as much pitching as power.

The Mets conclude their series with the Rockies with Pat Misch taking on Jason Marquis.

Here’s today’s line-up:

Angel Pagan, CF
Anderson Hernandez, 2B
David Wright, 3B
Daniel Murphy, 1B
Jeff Francoeur, RF
Cory Sullivan, LF
Josh Thole, C
Wilson Valdez, SS
Pat Misch. LP

Sep 01

Today in Baseball History; Tom Seaver blanks Bucs.

At the start of the season I promised I would keep up the blog as I continued my job search. I’ve been doing freelance, but haven’t landed anything full time. The economy is just not cooperating. I’ll keep plugging because that’s what I do. I fully intend to keep the blog going for as long as I can because I feel a commitment to you and because I enjoy it.

Quite frankly, it has kept me going at times. There are times I get depressed and overwhelmed, but the blog grounds me. It reminds me of what I like to do. For that, and your interest, I’ll always be grateful.

Recently, I spoke with someone about obtaining investors and other marketing ideas. For that to happen, however, I must show more than just Mets Chat Room. I will be coming up with other features and snippets of information to keep you interested. There will quotes, numbers features, as much news as I can get to, and analysis and commentaries.

If there are any suggestions, please let me know.

Tom was Terrific

Tom was Terrific

One of my passions is baseball history, so it will be natural for me to do a daily note on This Day in Baseball History. Of course, I’ll keep it Mets as often as I can.

What better way to start off than with Tom Seaver, who, on this day in 1975, shut out Pittsburgh, 3-0, at Shea Stadium. It was one of 44 career shutouts and 171 complete games in his Hall of Fame career.

One of Seaver’s club records which will never be broken is 21 complete games in 1971. With how the game is played these days, it might never be touched by anyone.

Of course, a post on Seaver is incomplete without asking you of your favorite moments of No. 41.

Mar 30

Time to retire Piazza ….

Tom Seaver and Mike Piazza, the two greatest players in franchise history, walked out of Shea Stadium to close the historic ballpark last fall. They’ll team to throw the ceremonial first pitch on Opening Day.

Opening Day won’t be the time to do so, but sometime this summer, the Mets should take a day to honor Mike Piazza by retiring his No. 31.

Feb 11

Let it stand ….

SHEA: Honor its legacy.

SHEA: Honor its legacy.

There is one remaining wall of what was Shea Stadium that’s still standing. I know it won’t happen, because such decisions are never made on the fly, but I’d like to see it remain standing. It would make a great gesture to the past.

However, the Mets could still honor their Shea history by outlining a replica of the playing field in the parking lot and denote where some of the most memorable plays occurred with statues. Such of Seaver on the mound when he struck out 19 Padres, or Buckner, or the Swododa and Agee catches, of Cleon catching the final out of the 69 Series.

In Atlanta, the Braves have a replica of an outfield wall and mark where Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s record, so it’s not like this hasn’t been done before.