Sep 01

Today in Baseball History; Tom Seaver blanks Bucs.

At the start of the season I promised I would keep up the blog as I continued my job search. I’ve been doing freelance, but haven’t landed anything full time. The economy is just not cooperating. I’ll keep plugging because that’s what I do. I fully intend to keep the blog going for as long as I can because I feel a commitment to you and because I enjoy it.

Quite frankly, it has kept me going at times. There are times I get depressed and overwhelmed, but the blog grounds me. It reminds me of what I like to do. For that, and your interest, I’ll always be grateful.

Recently, I spoke with someone about obtaining investors and other marketing ideas. For that to happen, however, I must show more than just Mets Chat Room. I will be coming up with other features and snippets of information to keep you interested. There will quotes, numbers features, as much news as I can get to, and analysis and commentaries.

If there are any suggestions, please let me know.

Tom was Terrific

Tom was Terrific

One of my passions is baseball history, so it will be natural for me to do a daily note on This Day in Baseball History. Of course, I’ll keep it Mets as often as I can.

What better way to start off than with Tom Seaver, who, on this day in 1975, shut out Pittsburgh, 3-0, at Shea Stadium. It was one of 44 career shutouts and 171 complete games in his Hall of Fame career.

One of Seaver’s club records which will never be broken is 21 complete games in 1971. With how the game is played these days, it might never be touched by anyone.

Of course, a post on Seaver is incomplete without asking you of your favorite moments of No. 41.

Mar 30

Time to retire Piazza ….

Tom Seaver and Mike Piazza, the two greatest players in franchise history, walked out of Shea Stadium to close the historic ballpark last fall. They’ll team to throw the ceremonial first pitch on Opening Day.

Opening Day won’t be the time to do so, but sometime this summer, the Mets should take a day to honor Mike Piazza by retiring his No. 31.

Feb 11

Let it stand ….

SHEA: Honor its legacy.

SHEA: Honor its legacy.

There is one remaining wall of what was Shea Stadium that’s still standing. I know it won’t happen, because such decisions are never made on the fly, but I’d like to see it remain standing. It would make a great gesture to the past.

However, the Mets could still honor their Shea history by outlining a replica of the playing field in the parking lot and denote where some of the most memorable plays occurred with statues. Such of Seaver on the mound when he struck out 19 Padres, or Buckner, or the Swododa and Agee catches, of Cleon catching the final out of the 69 Series.

In Atlanta, the Braves have a replica of an outfield wall and mark where Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s record, so it’s not like this hasn’t been done before.

Dec 02

The new and the old ….

PHOTO: Bill Menzel

PHOTO: Bill Menzel

Spent a good part of this brisk afternoon touring Citi Field, but the memory of the day was to peak inside to see the dismantling of Shea Stadium. Most of the seats are out. Headed to rec rooms throughout the tri-state area, no doubt.

There’s rubble throughout, with a patch of green in what used to be short left field. The action montage that lined the facing the loge level is all but gone. There is one word, “Believe,” from the montage that remains, and a Subway Ad in the right field corner.

The grass has been in Citi Field for a couple of weeks now, and you can tell this will be a magnificent place to watch the game. You’re right on top of things.

Two things the Mets promised you can plainly see. That would be the leg room between the seats and room in the concourses.