Jul 10

Mets Figuring Out What To Do With Matt Harvey

The New York Mets shouldn’t skip Matt Harvey’s next game if the sole motivation is to have him available to start the All-Star Game. However, if the intent is to begin a program to give his blister a chance to heal and reduce his innings in the second half, then go for it.

HARVEY: What's the plan? (AP)

HARVEY: What’s the plan? (AP)

That the decision to cut his innings coincides with the break is a fortunate bit of timing for the Mets, as Terry Collins and pitching coach Dan Warthen will have some time to structure a schedule.

“Dan and I are talking about trying to figure out how to start to cut this guy back a little bit,’’ Collins told reporters yesterday in San Francisco. “We’ll have to decide what happens on Saturday.’’

It is beginning to look as if Harvey will miss the Pirates, but it might not have come to this had he and the Mets acted sooner. Harvey said after last night’s game he’s been bothered by the blister in his last three starts and skipped his between-starts bullpen session prior to Monday.

That is incredulous.

How do the Mets not sit Harvey for one of those games, especially if in the back of their minds they are contemplating cutting his innings? Presumably, he’s been getting treatment for the blister, but if he didn’t report it to the training staff, that’s incredibly stupid on his part. If that is the case, then he didn’t learn anything when he tweaked his back earlier this season.

If he reported the blister and the Mets still ran him out there, that’s irresponsible by them.

How can this be? How can the Mets be so bent on Harvey starting the All-Star Game, yet play fast and loose with him regarding his starts for them? What is the priority?

The best way to limit innings is to skip the occasional start and not piecemeal it an inning or two at a time. This is the route the Nationals did not take last year with Stephen Strasburg.

If Harvey doesn’t pitch Saturday, and with the likelihood of him not starting the first or second game coming out of the break, that would effectively take him out of two starts in July. Finding a game each in August and September shouldn’t be difficult. If this situation is big-pictured, one missed start a month over the course of a season would be six on the year, or 28 instead of 34. That’s something to think about next year.

Meanwhile, there are currently no plans to limit Zack Wheeler’s innings, but he’s already missed time with an injury and the call-up. Plus, in his four starts with the Mets, he’s worked six innings just once, and that was his debut.

However, with Wheeler the issue isn’t innings as much as it is pitches, with his lowest being 89 in a 4.2-inning outing against Washington. This comes with him not being polished and rushed to the majors. As it turns out, the Mets need these starts from Wheeler, because they are having issues with their rotation.

Jon Niese is on the disabled list with a slight tear in his rotator cuff and at least a month away. The Mets also announced Shaun Marcum will undergo season-ending surgery to repair an artery obstruction. The surgery is similar to what Dillon Gee had last year.

Carlos Torres will replace Marcum in the rotation, but could first start in place of Harvey.

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Jul 05

Should The Mets Shut Down Jon Niese?

One had to wonder what the New York Mets were thinking when they said Jon Niese would undergo an MRI on July 4. The exam was re-scheduled until Monday because the doctor was, now get this, on vacation for the holiday.

Couldn’t somebody have figured that out ahead of time?

NIESE: Should the Mets shut him down? (AP)

NIESE: Should the Mets shut him down? (AP)

So, it won’t be determined until Monday whether Niese’s slightly torn rotator cuff will need surgery. Sending Niese to the mound without surgery or at least a longer period of rest with rehabilitation can’t be a good idea.

Sure, you want the Mets to be competitive, but not at the expense of Niese’s future.

With the way things currently are in the Mets’ rotation, they might need another starter because Shaun Marcum’s durability is in question, but its more prudent to dip below to Triple-A Las Vegas than it would be to go back to Niese.

Of course, Niese wants to pitch, but remember this is a transition year with little expected of the Mets. They are fourth in the NL East and 12 games below .500. With little reason to think they’ll suddenly flip a switch and become a contender, the prudent option might be to shut Niese down for the remainder of the season.

Rotator cuff surgery isn’t as debilitating as it once was, so if surgery were done know there’s a greater chance of him being ready next season, if not by spring training.

Remember, his injury isn’t deemed as serious as that of Johan Santana, so a shutdown might be the way to go. It is better to do it now when nothing is expected of the season than risk losing him later, perhaps next year when more is on the line.

PENDING ROSTER MOVES: The Mets must make a roster move to accommodate the promotion of first baseman Ike Davis. Optioning current first baseman Josh Satin isn’t going to happen.

One option is to send down Gonzalez Germen, however, the Mets are concerned about Marcum’s back for Saturday’s game and might need another pitcher.

ESPN reports a consideration could be sending out Kirk Nieuwenhuis or Jordany Valdespin, the latter whose playing time has greatly been reduced since the failed attempt at leaving him at second base for a week.

Reliever Greg Burke is returning on the Las Vegas shuttle after Brandon Lyon was designated for assignment after Thursday’s game.

SERIES ROTATION: Zack Wheeler (1-1, 5.06 ERA) goes against Johnny Hellweg (0-1, 20.25) tonight; Marcum (1-9, 5.03) is tentatively scheduled against Yovani Gallardo (6-8, 4.78) Saturday, and Jeremy Hefner (3-6, 3.54) starts against Wily Peralta (5-9, 5.27) Sunday.

Interesting but no pitcher in the series has a winning record. I wonder when the last time that occurred this late in the season.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jul 03

Jeremy Hefner Among Group Of Mets Making 2014 Noises

The New York Mets had high expectations for Matt Harvey for this year. Jeremy Hefner was to fill out the rotation in Las Vegas, and be called up if something went wrong, like we knew it would, in Flushing.

Hefner’s break came with the expected breakdown of Johan Santana. He made the Opening Day roster, was hammered early, but eventually has become one of the Mets’ most effective pitchers with a 1.80 ERA in June. That was even better than Harvey.

HEFNER: Proving his value every fifth day. (AP)

HEFNER: Proving his value every fifth day. (AP)

A successful season for the Mets would be defined as .500, and the rest of the season should be about who will be around in 2014.

Hefner is one, as are five other players in last night’s lineup who weren’t on the Mets’ Opening Day roster: Eric Young, Josh Satin, Omar Quintanilla, Anthony Recker and Andrew Brown. There are others, too, including: Zack Wheeler, David Aardsma, Carlos Torres and Juan Lagares.

That’s eight players out of 25, roughly a third of their roster who were afterthoughts in April now on their radar. That’s a combination of making the wrong decisions coming out of spring training and having some organizational depth.

Perhaps all won’t be on the 2014 Opening Day roster, but it’s a starting point for next year, which is the essence of this summer.

A lack of run support has Hefner at 3-6, but his ERA of 3.54 is telling us a different story. With Jon Niese out, and Dillon Gee and Shaun Marcum hurting, Hefner is the No. 2 starter, one who’ll be sought out by contenders and someone the Mets would be foolish to deal.

In constructing next year’s rotation, factor in Wheeler and Hefner, and discard Marcum. Should Niese require rotator cuff surgery, which we could know this week, there will be a need to add.

After going through nine other players, the Mets seen to have found their leadoff hitter in Young, who can play the outfield and second base.

Lagares is being given every opportunity to win the center field job, which accounts for two of the outfield positions. Marlon Byrd, you figure, will either be traded or too expensive to re-sign in the off-season. If it’s the latter, that could turn into a mistake.

The Mets promised to add an outfielder, but assuming they don’t that leaves Kirk Nieuwenhuis and Lucas Duda competing for a spot.

Josh Satin is proving to be a viable option at first base assuming Ike Davis is either traded or leaves as a free agent. The Mets are using this month to ascertain Davis’ trade value. If they don’t deal him, there’s a good chance he won’t be tendered a contract and leaves as a free agent.

Terry Collins said Ruben Tejada must beat out Quintanilla to re-take the shortstop job. Assuming he doesn’t, Quintanilla has shown the Mets they won’t have to shop at that position.

I look at Brown as bench depth, and the same for the loser of the Quintanilla-Tejada competition.

The only other positions in question are catcher and the bullpen. The latter has recently been good, but overall is inconsistent. Torres should get a chance to compete for a job, but I don’t see LaTroy Hawkins coming back. He and Brandon Lyon can be swapped out. The same goes to Scott Rice if the Mets don’t burn him out.

Recker started last night and homered and singled, which should get him more playing time since the Mets have burned out John Buck. Travis d’Arnaud is now considered a September call-up, which might not be enough time to learn about him. So, somewhere Buck and Recker must be in the Mets’ 2014 plans somewhere.

Rarely does a season begin and end with the same roster, and the Mets are no exception. However, what they have now can morph into the foundation for next year’s roster.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jun 27

Time Is Right For Mets To Deal Shaun Marcum

With each scoreless inning Shaun Marcum threw Wednesday night in Chicago, I couldn’t help but think: What could the New York Mets get for this guy?

Marcum was stellar in shutting down the White Sox, 3-0, giving up four hits and two walks, and several times showed the guile needed to escape trouble. The eight innings was a terrific sign for a contender needing rotation depth.

MARCUM: Trade value could be high now. (Getty)

MARCUM: Trade value could be high now. (Getty)

The concept of dealing Marcum has been raised here several times, but the question was always raised of what the Mets could get for him.

They certainly won’t get a blue-chip prospect, but somebody in the lower levels. That’s not a lot, but for a rebuilding team the stockpiling of minor leaguers or draft picks are essential.

There’s roughly $2 million remaining on Marcum’s contract for this season, which is highly palatable these days. Plus, the Mets are highly unlikely to bring him back next season.

Marcum won for the first time last night, but strange as it sounds, he’s pitched better than his 1-9 record. He’s given the Mets innings and pitched both as a stater and reliever. He’s 31 and the injury issues in the spring are behind him. After last night, his value will never be higher.

The Mets are short in the rotation with Jon Niese on the disabled list and Collin McHugh traded, but this is an opportunity to take a look at somebody in their minor league system.

WEATHER FORECAST: The expected high today in Denver will be 94 degrees, 65 degrees warmer from when the Mets were here in April.

In the absurdity of the major league schedule, the Mets were scheduled for back-to-back April series in Minnesota and Denver, where the weather is traditionally raw that time of year.

Yes, somebody has to play in those cities, but it shouldn’t be an interleague or non-division team, which makes it difficult to reschedule. If Major League Baseball is adamant about interleague play and the unbalanced schedule, at least schedule within the division for the first three weeks.

Doing so makes it easier to reschedule rained-out games with day-night doubleheaders later in the season.

HEFNER GOES TODAY: Jeremy Hefner (2-6, 3.89 ERA) goes against Tyler Chatwood (4-1, 2.22) today at Coors Field.

Today’s game marks the return of Eric Young to Denver, where he played five seasons. The acquisition of Young provided a spark and apparently resolved the Mets’ leadoff issues. Young is the tenth player they’ve used at the top of the order and he has responded, hitting .414 in his first 29 at-bats with the Mets.

Young told reporters last night in Chicago: “It’s going to be my first time being on the visiting side when it comes to playing against the Rockies. … I’m sure a lot of emotion is going to be involved.’’

Terry Collins said David Wright will sit today, but since he’s hot and always hit well in Colorado, don’t be surprised. Wright has proved persuasive in staying in the lineup.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jun 26

It’s Shaun Marcum Day!

Nope, I couldn’t write the headline with a straight face. I tried, but Shaun Marcum’s start in his first year with the New York Mets is reaching historic proportions. To the point of being humorous if it weren’t so aggravating.

Marcum, who has had several strong relief performances, but generally has pitched in bad luck and an inability to avoid the big inning, will be going for his first victory of the season. It is almost impossible to believe he’s 0-9. One would think he’d win one by accident.

MARCUM: Sooner of later he has to win, right?

MARCUM: Sooner of later he has to win, right?

Only two pitchers in club history to have a worse start than Marcum are Anthony Young (0-13 in 1993) and Bob Miller (0-12 in 1962).

It was thought Marcum’s $4-million salary might save him from being bounced from the rotation, but that issue never materialized when Jon Niese was placed on the disabled list.

I still maintain Marcum could have some value to a contender in that he’s giving roughly five innings a start and his record is largely indicative of a lack of support.

Since it is clear the Mets will not bring him back, they should get whatever they can for him.

After the game, the Mets fly to Colorado for a make-up game. Terry Collins is saying that’s the day he’ll give a day off to David Wright, who is in the line-up today against left-hander John Danks.

Here’s tonight’s batting order:

Eric Young, LF: Is the tenth and hopefully last leadoff hitter used by the Mets. Is batting .360 (9-for-25) in six games with the Mets.

Daniel Murphy, 2B: In a bit of a slump, hitting .179 (7-for-39) in his last ten games.

David Wright, 3B: Takes a seven-game hitting streak into tonight’s game. Overall he’s crushing the ball, hitting .359 (14-for-39) on the trip.

Marlon Byrd, RF: One of the few Mets to hit for power with 11 homers and 36 RBI. Is playing good defense and has more than justified his signing. He’s a chip the Mets could dangle in front of a contender.

Josh Satin, 1B: Very glad to see him get a shot at first base. When Ike Davis returns, which could be Thursday, he could go back to Triple-A Las Vegas.

John Buck, C: Has played in 60 of Mets’ 73 games. Yes, he’s tired as reflected in his 36 RBI, with 25 of them coming in April. Has only three homers since April.

Andrew Brown, DH: Has three homers in limited time with Mets.

Juan Lagares, CF: This guy can play center field. There’s no question about his defense, but the issue is whether he can consistently hit. Is batting .286 (8-for-28) on the trip.

Omar Quintanilla, SS: Is batting .333 over his last eight games and making most of the plays in the field. Funny we don’t hear much about Ruben Tejada’s rehab.

Shaun Marcum, RHP: Is 3-0 lifetime against the White Sox.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos