Mar 05

Marcum, Hawkins And Feliciano Work Today; Waiting For Mejia Results

With Jenrry Mejia in New York for an exam, several other Mets pitching prospects – if you can call injured and aging veterans that – toiled in a “B’’ game against Miami.

Shaun Marcum, who hasn’t endeared himself to manager Terry Collins by not being in the best shape upon his arrival and 40-year-old LaTroy Hawkins each worked two innings.

Marcum didn’t give up a run while Hawkins gave up one. In addition, Pedro Feliciano gave up a run in one inning.

Hawkins and Feliciano are competing for spots in the bullpen while Marcum is the projected fifth starter.

Mejia’s test results are expected to be announced tomorrow.

Mar 05

Mejia Flying To NY For Undisclosed Medical Condition

MetsGreetings from Port St. Lucie, where the Mets have the afternoon off. However, just because they are down for the day, it doesn’t mean there isn’t anything happening.

I just checked into the hotel and will hit the ground running.

They wouldn’t be the Mets if there weren’t injury news. Jenrry Mejia returned to New York this morning to have an undisclosed medical condition checked out. As with Pedro Feliciano before him, his reporting physical was red flagged.

Mejia is coming off Tommy John surgery, but there is no word yet whether the injury is to his elbow.

Mejia, who is expected to open the season at Triple-A Las Vegas, was scheduled to pitch in a “B’’ game this morning against Miami.

Also scheduled to pitch are Shaun Marcum, Felicano and LaTroy Hawkins. I’ll have those results later.

Mar 04

Questions About Marcum, Santana And Nieuwenhuis

The Mets are off tomorrow, but have a “B’’ game in Jupiter in which Shaun Marcum, Pedro Feliciano and LaTroy Hawkins will pitch.

The projected fifth starter, Marcum, raised concerns when he didn’t report in shape. Here is a guy trying to hang onto a major league job and he doesn’t come to camp ready to pitch and says he only needs four exhibition appearances to get ready for the season.

MARCUM: Pitches tomorrow.

MARCUM: Pitches tomorrow.

Guys like that are hard to cheer for and you only hope he’s right about the four games. Somehow, I doubt it.

Hawkins, 40, is competing for a bullpen spot, and as a veteran supposedly requires only a minimum amount of innings.

Feliciano, once a Mets’ workhorse out of the pen, was sidelined with a heart ailment and is required to wear a monitor.

Considering all three could make the staff, that’s not a good sign for the Mets’ pitching.

SANTANA QUESTIONS: Other than Johan Santana being angry at reporters having the nerve to ask him about his condition, there’s been no timetable in the wake of his throwing off the mound Sunday.

I still don’t understand how the Mets can say they monitored Santana in the off-season, yet be surprised he didn’t come to camp in shape.

I also don’t understand why Santana, who knows the Mets won’t extend him beyond this season, didn’t report ready considering he would be pitching for a new contract.

Perhaps, with $31 million due him from the Mets this year, he’s already thought about cashing in his chips and calling it a career.

Just wondering. Also wondering why Santana wanted to pitch in the World Baseball Classic for Venezuela  when he’s not even ready to pitch in an exhibition game for the Mets.

Continue reading

Feb 26

Mets Matters: Mejia Rocked; Wright Captaincy

Jenrry Mejia was hammered this afternoon by Miami in his spring training debut, giving up a grand slam in a five-inning first inning in the Mets’ 7-5 loss.

MEJIA: Not a good day.

          MEJIA: Not a good day. (AP)

Mejia gave up five runs on four hits in a 30-pitch inning. Apparently, few of those pitches were effective.

Terry Collins said Mejia didn’t have the darting cut on his fastball, and suggested the problem could be attributed to having Tommy John surgery after the 2010 season. That was the year Mejia was rushed as a reliever, demoted to the minor leagues where he started, then was injured.

The Mets still don’t know Mejia’s eventual role. He’s expected to start this year, but pitching coach Dan Warthen and minor league manager Wally Backman believe he’s better suited for the bullpen. Collins admitted to that after the game.

Mejia is expected to open the season in the minor leagues unless there’s an injury in the rotation.

Continue reading

Feb 16

Jenrry Mejia’s Role Is Set

Once he arrives in camp – which might take another week – it appears Jenrry Mejia’s spring is already laid out for him.

Barring an injury to somebody rated ahead of him, Mejia will be used as a starting pitcher and expected to open the season at Triple-A Las Vegas. This decision has nothing to do with his visa problems in leaving the Dominican Republic.

Not that they don’t need bullpen help, but this is the best course for the Mets, both in the short and long terms.

The Mets have several rotation questions, and if history is an indicator they will have a need for another starter or two this season. It is that way every summer.

And, for next year and beyond, the Mets will need another starter, as there are no plans to bring back Johan Santana.

The Mets’ projected rotation includes Santana, Jon Niese, Matt Harvey, Shaun Marcum and Dillon Gee. Mejia and Zack Wheeler are next in line.

Santana and Gee are coming off injuries; Niese’s career-high is 13 victories; Harvey has ten career starts; and Marcum was a late FA pick-up. Now, you tell me that is a position of strength.

Clearly, the Mets need more starting pitching depth.

Mejia has been bounced around between the rotation and the pen, and I still maintain Jerry Manuel’s insistence of using him as an untested reliever set back his career. Through it all, Mejia’s greatest success has been as a starter, and it is the team’s obligation to put him in a position where he’s best able to succeed.

After coming off Tommy John surgery last year – and who says there’s not a connection with how he’s been handled? – Mejia’s numbers were far superior as a starter.

Mejia posted a 2.75 ERA and .245 opponents batting average as a starter compared to a 5.48 ERA and .303 opponents batting average out of the bullpen.

While it isn’t the largest sampling, it is enough to determine his comfort zone and the best place to start.

Starting pitching is expensive, and despite Fred Wilpon’s proclamation his finances are in order and the Mets will spend in the future, that’s no guarantee. What is assured, however, is the Mets don’t have the chips to deal for a starter and anybody of substance in the free-agent market will be costly. That’s another reason why grooming Mejia in this role is the prudent option because of his reasonable salary.

Mejia needs this year to fully come back from his injury and build up the strength to pitch seven plus innings every fifth day. This is the best course for both Mejia and the Mets.

Meanwhile, Mejia is working out at the Mets’ complex in the Dominican Republic and manager Terry Collins thinks it could be another week before he gets to Florida.