Nov 08

Let’s be realistic ….

As a writer, I do a lot of reading, and it is amazing some of the things I see out there. I won’t refute by name, but idea, and the idea I don’t get is John Lackey.

Yes, I think it would be fantastic if the Mets got him, but I see three teams ahead of the them: the Rangers, Yankees and Angels.

Lackey’s preference if he leaves are the Rangers. The Angels would like to keep him, but might balk at his asking price. Then, of course, there are the Yankees, who, if they really want him will get him if he’s open to New York.
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Nov 05

In case you were wondering ….

The market for Matt Holliday will be expensive. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has reported the Cardinals are discussing a six-year, $96-million contract. If that’s the club’s starting point, you know it will only end up higher, especially with Scott Boras being his agent.

Holliday’s deal will end up north of $100 million, which I think is too rich for the Mets’ blood. That’s a lot of money, which could improve other areas of the team. As important as adding Holliday would be, the Mets could upgrade their pitching and add a lesser bat, which in the big picture would improve their situation.

Sep 29

Would you extend Beltran’s contract now?

One of the core wants to stay. Carlos Beltran, 32, who returned from the disabled list earlier this month in an attempt to salvage part of his season, said he wants to finish his career with the Mets and told his agent to approach the team for an extension after the season.

That would be Scott Boras, who prefers to test the FA market.

Beltran, although not a great crowd favorite, has more than done his job with the Mets. He’s been productive and played hurt. He’s also performed in the clutch and has been an All-Star, Gold Glover and Silver Slugger winner.

BELTRAN: Plenty of expectations with his contract.

BELTRAN: Plenty of expectations with his contract.


His best season, by far, was 2006, when he finished fourth in the MVP voting. Beltran tied a club record with 41 homers, including walk-offs against the Phillies and Cardinals. Beltran also homered three times in the NLCS against the Cardinals, but will always be remembered for taking a third strike from Adam Wainwright to end the series.

That strikeout could be why he’s never been as appreciated as he should be.

What I like about Beltran, is with the season over from a competitive standpoint, he worked hard to come back from the DLwhen it would have been easy to shut down.

“Why not?’’ Beltran said. “I don’t feel obligated. This is my job.’’

Beltran is at an age where an extension wouldn’t be a terrible idea, because by the end of his current deal he’d be 34, and still a productive player.

BELTRAN: He's produced.

BELTRAN: He's produced.


However, if the Mets do this, I see it happening after next season and not this year.

My thinking is the Mets should be wary because of Beltran’s injury history the past two years. In addition, the Mets have so many holes to fill that their attention will be elsewhere.

However, there’s another reason why I see the Mets waiting, and that’s because they really don’t know what direction they are heading. Do they need a tweaking or an overhaul?

The story of this season has been the injuries, and if they return healthy and productive next year, then a case can be made that the Mets are not as bad as they appear. In that case, they’d be wise to bring back Beltran.

Of course, that includes Beltran having a good and healthy season.

However, if the Mets continue their downward spiral, and Beltran has another off-year, then it would be time to start over.

I like Beltran, but I’m not extending him this winter. There are too many variables.

Feb 05

Is Torre right about Beltran?

In his book, Joe Torre took a jab at Carlos Beltran, calling him soft mentally and questioned his leadership capabilities. It’s a rap that resurfaced during the Mets’ pennant race fades the past two years.

Torre said Beltran wanted to come to the Yankees for a discount, but was talked out of it by his agent, Scott Boras, who got him an extra year and $19 million more with the Mets (seven at $119 million).

Said Torre: “Beltran wanted to come to us, so he could hide among the trees. Nobody wants to be that guy to lead.”

Not surprisingly, Beltran refuted Torre at last night’s Thurman Munson Dinner.

“First of all, I don’t know Joe Torre personally, so I don’t know what kind of person he is,” Beltran said. “The second thing I have to say is that when I met with the Yankees when I was a free agent, he wasn’t there, so you know, he didn’t know that we talked, so I didn’t meet him. So if he did say what he said, then that’s his opinion. I don’t have to comment on that. I feel very happy where I am.”

Beltran said Torre will have one less sale.

Jan 27

Smoke coming from the Perez camp

PEREZ: Get it done.

PEREZ: Get it done.

You would think with less than three weeks before spring training there would be a market for a 27-year-old lefthander who throws heat.

There’s not.

If Oliver Perez were to get five years as agent Scott Boras wants, he would have gotten them by now. A combination of Perez’s wildness, his agent, and perhaps the prevailing thought he’d always wind up with the Mets is keeping teams at bay.

C’mon, let’s cut through the smoke. Give him three years at $12 million each with an option for a fourth year, and get this thing done.

I spoke with Boras this summer when the Mets were in LA and remember him telling me Perez wasn’t erratic. I didn’t believe him then and I don’t believe him now. If Boras really had that much faith in his client, he’d take two years and jump at the chance to do this again when Perez is 29.

Why do you think he hasn’t?