Jul 12

Beltran showcased tonight at All-Star Game.

Carlos Beltran, potentially a future former Met, has the national stage in tonight’s All-Star Game to showcase his talents for a potential trade.

Of course, if teams have been paying attention during the first half they will know he’s physically holding up, that he’s adjusted to right field without a problem, and is playing well.

BELTRAN: Who is watching?

Beltran will start tonight as the designated hitter and bat second.

The Mets have exceeded expectations at 46-45, but are 11 games behind the Phillies and 7.5 behind Atlanta for the wild card. The only concession the Mets are making toward investing for the future is saying it is unlikely Jose Reyes will be traded.

Not so with Beltran and Francisco Rodriguez. Beltran knows the Mets are trying to move him, and jerked around by the organization over his knee surgery, his relationship with the team isn’t warm and cozy despite his guarded comments yesterday at the All-Star media sessions.

“A lot of teams this time, they’re looking to improve, some others are looking to rebuild,’’ Beltran said. “Right now, the Mets are playing good baseball.  I like where I am. We’re having fun and we just hope to continue to improve.’’

Beltran is in the last year of a seven-year, $119 million deal. Roughly $9 million will be paid Beltran in the second half, but if the Mets aren’t a contender, and they know they won’t bring him back, their best option would be making a trade.

San Francisco and Boston are two of the teams with a reported interest in Beltran.

Beltran went through this in 2004 when he was with Kansas City, so he’s treading familiar waters.

“I guess that experience makes you understand the business side of baseball a little better. You can’t take it personally,’’ Beltran said. “Having the no-trade clause gives me a little bit of control. I will choose if I like the trade. This is my 12th year in the big leagues, so at this point, all I want is to win and to have the opportunity to be in the playoffs.’’

Beltran’s agent is Scott Boras, who recently convinced Francisco Rodriguez to abandon his agent. Paul Kinzer to sign with him. On the surface, dumping Boras shows loyalty isn’t one of Rodriguez’s strong suits, so the Mets shouldn’t expect anything from him.

Mets GM Sandy Alderson said he doesn’t know how signing with Boras will impact Rodriguez’s future with the team. Rodriguez said he would accept a deal to a contender and work as a set-up reliever if there’s a contract extension in the picture.  If Rodriguez completes 55 games this season, a $17.5 million option will kick in, and that’s something the cost conscious Mets can’t afford.

Boras will not make things easy for the Mets regarding Rodriguez.

“Francisco Rodriguez is a historic closer,’’ Boras told reporters yesterday in Arizona. “He’s not going anywhere to be a setup man. … Closers don’t make good setup men. Does anybody want an unhappy setup man in their clubhouse?’’

Jun 22

Poll: What should the Mets do with Carlos Beltran?

I’ve added a poll on what the Mets should do with Carlos Beltran. Your votes and comments would be greatly appreciated.

Should they:

1. Keep him and make a long-shot run at the postseason, even if it means not receiving any draft picks when he inevitably signs elsewhere as a free agent?

2. Trade him for whatever they can get and save some salary, even if that’s a white flag on the season?

3. And, the long shot of the all, re-sign him to an extension now. Figuring his agent is Scott Boras, he’ll probably ask for three years.

Thanks.

 

 

 

May 05

Beltran will be hard to deal.

Although he is playing well, it is not likely the Mets will be able to trade Carlos Beltran at the deadline, which would be their preference at to get rid of as much of his $18.5 million salary as possible.

BELTRAN: Won't be easy to trade.

 

Entering the season, at 34, Beltran’s age, salary and injury history assuredly meant it would be his last year with the financially strapped Mets.

Beltran is playing for one more contract, but can’t count on a team dealing for him this season and signing him to an extension at that time.

It likely won’t happen because even half of Beltran’s contract would be hard to swallow on a rental and four months is too small a playing window to ascertain if he’s worth long-term extension.

 

There’s also the matter of his agent, Scott Boras, who traditionally prefers putting his players on the open market.

Beltran has hit safely in 13 of his last 15 games, and is batting .294 with a .379 on-base percentage. Power wise, he has four homers and 11 doubles.

But, most importantly, he’s running well on his knees and has taken to right field. The health issues that have dogged Beltran the past two seasons appear behind him. Yes, it is early, but Beltran is playing regularly (the last game in which he had less than three plate appearances was April 12, the first game of a doubleheader against Colorado).

ON DECK: Mets pre-game with Mike Pelfrey.

Feb 28

Beltran move to right official; best interest of all

BELTRAN: Makes move to right

In the end, Carlos Beltran acted with his head over his heart.

While still believing he could play center field, the 33-year-old Beltran doesn’t think he could play to the level he had grown accustomed to immediately and told manager Terry Collins this morning that it was in the best interest of everybody that he move to right field now and let Angel Pagan play center.

Beltran said he wanted to make the switch now because of his knees, although Collins was prepared to give the veteran until the middle of the month to see if he can still play center.

“I have to think about my health and how to be in the field for the team,’’ Beltran told reporters this morning in Port St. Lucie. “ I believe the best decision is for me to play right field. It’s going to be less active, and I am looking forward to saving my knees for the long run.

“I know if I am healthy and I can play more time in the field, I can help this team offensively, even in the outfield. I know it will be a different transition for me to make but I feel I will be able to go to that.’’

Continue reading

Feb 22

For Beltran, his best move is to right

When Carlos Beltran said at the start of camp he might need a little extra time to see if his arthritic right knee will adjust to the riggers of playing center field – saying he doesn’t want to be “embarrassed,” – he might as well have said the move to right field  should be made sooner rather than later.

BELTRAN: Should make the move now.

I’ve been saying a healthy Beltran playing center could be easier to move at the trade deadline because of his contract, and while that might be true, him playing right field might be in the best interest of future contract. The move to a corner outfield spot will happen eventually, and with Beltran being a free agent after the season, his ability to show he can adjust now will only enhance his chances of landing another multi-year contract.

With the Mets undoubtedly not bringing him back, this year will be an audition for Beltran to prove he can stay healthy and be productive. At 34, any team considering Beltran would need to know if he can play the corner spot, so this year is an opportunity for him to get that question out of the way.

Right field will decrease the wear on his legs, which should help increase his offensive production, and that’s what any team will be looking from Beltran at this stage of his career.

Beltran’s pride might deter him from wanting to move positions, but there will be an even greater hit to his ego – and perhaps his bank account – if he tries and fails. From agent Scott Boras’ perspective, playing right field would prove to be a good business decision.