Jun 19

Mets Should Sign DeGrom Over Harvey

Should the Mets opt to sign just one of their wunderkind pitchers to a long-term contract, my choice would be tonight’s starter, Jacob deGrom. And, if they opt to trade one, I’d first offer Matt Harvey.

Ideally, after this season they should make a run at signing all three to long-term deals. The money would be high, but not nearly what it will eventually be. They must be aggressive and determined, but do you really see that happening?

DE GROM: A keeper. (AP)

DE GROM: A keeper. (AP)

I can’t say for sure deGrom would be easiest to sign or cost less. That’s a hunch. But, it certainly wouldn’t be Harvey, whose agent, Scott Boras, is known for not leaving any money on the table. Boras’ plan has traditionally been to wait until a player reaches free-agent status and play the market. Undoubtedly, this is what he wants with Harvey, and ideally, he wants to play the Mets against the Yankees.

I’ve said numerous times Harvey yearns to be a Yankee. If I am right, that’s fine, that’s his prerogative, that’s his right, but the Mets shouldn’t get caught up in a bidding war. If they want to keep Harvey for the duration of his career, they need to strike before the market opens. But, I don’t think Boras will let that happen, unless, of course, the Mets would be offering 2019 money, which is the year he becomes a free agent.

I don’t believe that will happen, either. However, if the Mets are as committed to building a winning team as they claim to be, they must dig deep.

The guess here is deGrom and Noah Syndergaard might be easier to sign.

DeGrom (7-4, 2.33) is pitching the best so far this season – he is 4-0 with a 1.25 ERA over his last six starts – but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. He could have won another had his defense and bullpen not coughed it up for him tonight.

There’s a lot to like about deGrom, including his mound composure, command and ability to locate his pitches. Harvey has those things, too, but this year his command has been off as evidenced by all the home runs he’s given up.

So, if it boils down to one in deGrom vs. Harvey and whom to keep, I’m going with deGrom. He has about the same amount of talent, could be financially a better investment, is not a diva, and ultimately, I can’t shake the belief Harvey’s heart is really in the Bronx.

That’s what I believe. I also believe if the Mets had to trade one, my first choice would be Harvey for the same reasons.

Feb 12

Harvey Weighs In On A-Rod. Yanks In His Future?

Future Yankees pitcher Matt Harvey, who grew up in Connecticut cheering for the team in the Bronx, weighed in on Alex Rodriguez’s return.

Harvey told the New York Post this week: “Obviously Alex wants to play, that’s good for him, good for baseball. If he is that dedicated and wants to come back then more power to him for going up to the organization like that, it shows a lot. It will be exciting to see what he can do.’’

Harvey’s affection for the Yankees is well known as is his strong desire of playing in New York. Although he said all the right things a few days ago, it can’t be forgotten about his sparring with Mets’ management about where he would do his rehab and wanting to pitch last year. And, it must remembered he won’t have to move he signed with the Yankees.

What Mets’ fan can forget Harvey being photographed at Yankee Stadium watching Derek Jeter? The Mets bit their tongue on that, but privately they weren’t happy, from the front office to the clubhouse. Perhaps they would have said something had Harvey worn a Yankees’ cap.

Harvey will be under Mets’ control through the 2018 season, but by that time could have gone through several arbitration processes, which can get be tension filled.

If the Mets continue to pinch their pennies until then, who can’t see him moving on, especially with his agent being Scott Boras?

We don’t know what the Mets’ financial landscape will look by then, or even if they’ll be a contender. However, this much we know, Boras usually takes his clients through the free-agent process looking for every last dollar. And, we also know the Yankees, unlike the Mets, aren’t afraid to spend and have the resources to live through a bad contract.

Sure, this is a few years down the road, but Boras operates with a multi-year calendar.

Feb 08

Anticipation Growing For Mets’ Harvey

The circus that will soon be the New York Mets’ spring training is days away when Matt Harvey will roll into Port St. Lucie. Then the questions will start, and won’t likely stop any time soon,

How’s your arm feel? When will you throw? Will you be ready for Opening Day? What’s your innings limit this season? How’s your arm feel?

Harvey will be asked about his arm before and after every start. He’ll also be asked how he felt about missing all of last season, and whether he should have been allowed to pitch.

While pitchers-and-catchers report next week, Harvey is expected to arrive early.

“There’s always that question mark,’’ Jonathon Niese, who is already in Port St. Lucie, told reporters. “I know he works his tail off and I know he’ll be ready. I don’t think there’s anybody who wants it more than he does.’’

That is, unless you discount every Mets’ fan who anguished over this team over the past decade.

Harvey spent much of his offseason working out at Citi Field and also training at the compound run by his agent, Scott Boras.

There’s a growing excitement surrounding this Mets’ team and Harvey is a big part of the anticipation. He was the talk of the town two summers ago, and spent a lot of time in the news last year, often complaining about wanting to pitch despite the Mets’ objections.

He’s again the talk of the Mets, and the organization and its fans can’t be any more excited.

 

Jan 28

Mets Not In It For Bourn; Will Look At Wilson Again

Not surprisingly, it is looking as if the Mets will enter spring training with their current outfield and pitching staff composition or sign a free agent not worthy of draft pick compensation.

The Mets had been thinking of Michael Bourn and Kyle Lohse, but do not want to lose the 11th pick. The ten worst records have their pick protected, but Pittsburgh displaced the Mets from the top ten because the Pirates did not sign their 2012 first-round pick.

The Mets’ argument is they shouldn’t be penalized for something the Pirates did not do.

“Obviously, we want to have some sense of which way that interpretation would go before we made any final decision,’’ GM Sandy Alderson said. “At this point, it’s all speculation.’’

Either way, with Scott Boras his agent, Bourn would not come cheaply.

Alderson admitted the free-agent market has greatly thinned and the trade market is slow because teams are preparing for spring training. If somebody doesn’t step up from within, the Mets will shop the free-agent market again when teams make their roster cuts.

Also thin is the bullpen pool, where Alderson will again take a look at former Giant Brian Wilson. Alderson watched Wilson, Jan. 12, in Los Angeles, but came away unimpressed with his velocity.

 

Jun 01

History Revised With Carlos Beltran Returning

Covering baseball for over two decades taught me several things, some simple and others more complex. Several of these valuable lessons will come into play tonight with Carlos Beltran’s return to New York to face the Mets as a member of the Cardinals.

Baseball has its ironies and Beltran comes back playing for the team that bounced the Mets from the 2006 NLCS. He also finds himself playing behind the pitcher, Adam Wainwright, who threw the knee buckling curveball that froze Beltran and forever placed him into the darkest recesses of Mets lore.

BELTRAN: Had some magic moments with that swing.

As far as irony goes, this is pretty delicious stuff, but not so savory are the remembrances of Beltran by Mets’ fans of his tenure here and comments made, and written, by several members of the New York media, beginning with WFAN’s Craig Carton, nothing more than a shock jock who vainly tries to entertain with vulgarity and cheap, crass humor.

This morning he crudely made fun of a mole on the side of Beltran’s face.

Making fun of a person’s looks or physical abnormality in the attempt of humor is simply low. It also does nothing to add to the supposed theory of New York fans and media being sophisticated. How sophisticated is it to joke about a person’s physical appearance or blemish? Are we still in the fifth grade, Carton? And, what is it Boomer Esiason always ends his show with? Stay classy New York.

Nothing classy about Carton this morning.

I don’t think much about Beltran’s reception tonight. He’ll get his fair share of cheers. Boos, too. There will also be indifference, which, to an athlete is more venomous than hate.

When it comes to Beltran’s career with the Mets, there’s nothing about it that warrants hate. Beltran was signed after a historic playoff run with the Houston Astros. The Mets, then on the verge of developing into a contender, were at an interesting phase in their history and Beltran was signed as a cornerstone.

The Mets wrestled Beltran from the Yankees that winter, but there would always be the wonder if he really wanted Queens because his agent, Scott Boras, made a last minute pitch to the Yankees.

Beltran struggled his first season with the Mets – a lot of players do in making the transition to the city – but what highlighted that summer was him playing with a broken face after a horrific outfield collision with Mike Cameron.

Say what you will about Beltran’s quiet, and low key demeanor and persona, but he played hurt and when healthy produced and posted significant numbers. He might have been one of the Mets’ best position players they have ever had if he was healthy his entire tenure here.

Beltran had an incredible 2006 season, which unfortunately for him has been reduced to one at-bat. More of those sophisticated fans at work, right?

The Mets haven’t been close to the World Series since, but that hasn’t been Beltran’s fault as much as it was their inability to bolster their rotation and bullpen, to overcome a long string of serious injuries and poor signings and acquisitions.

To say Beltran’s at-bat against Wainwright slammed shut the Mets’ playoff aspirations is an oversimplification because there is that matter of blowing a seven-game lead with 17 remaining in 2007 plus another late-season collapse in 2008. Totally unfair to pin that all on Beltran.

Beltran was a very good player on a flawed team and should be remembered for his ability to perform while frequently injured. Outside of the episode when Beltran had surgery on his own – and can you blame him considering the Mets’ shoddy history of handling of injuries? – he was pretty much a team player.

Much has been attempted to be made of about a divide in the Mets’ clubhouse between the Hispanic and American players with Beltran being made a cause. In reality, the central figure in that friction was more Carlos Delgado, brought on by his differences with then manager Willie Randolph.

Delgado had some clubhouse lawyer in him, while Beltran’s personality precluded him from being a vocal presence. And, Delgado had a deeper influence on Jose Reyes than Beltran, so keep than in mind, too, when laying the groundwork for Reyes’ departure.

Beltran was a very good player who didn’t live up to the expectations created  by that monster postseason when he was with Houston. He was never going to live up to those lofty expectations or that salary.

The important thing to remember, however, is he tried. And for that, he deserves your respect and cheers tonight.