Sep 14

If Harvey Remains An Issue, Let Him Go Home

This won’t go over well with many, but so be it: I don’t care if Matt Harvey pitches in the playoffs for the Mets. I don’t care if he pitches for them again this season or not.

This “will he or won’t he?’’ crap is boring with much of it Harvey’s fault. If Harvey wants to pitch that badly in the playoffs, then pitch. The easy thing is to blame agent Scott Boras, which SNY wrongly did last week. Once and for all, eliminate this innings issue. Supposedly this was done when he pitched in Washington.

HARVEY: Won' be throwing tonight. (AP)

HARVEY: Won’ be throwing tonight. (AP)

Harvey didn’t clear things up yesterday in Atlanta, and it will surface Monday when Logan Verrett starts over him against Miami. Harvey is supposed to pitch this weekend against the Yankees, but after that, nobody knows. There’s talk of keeping Harvey in a regular rotation, but have him pitch a half-game, with Sean Gilmartin or Erik Goeddel pitching multiple innings.

How sharp he’ll be in this format, and if he can extend himself again in the playoffs are in question.

The Mets are fortunate to have broken open the NL East. They are also fortunate the Nationals collapsed and might not even finish .500. Imagine what a mess this would be if there was still a race.

When Harvey spoke recently about selecting Boras for a reason, we knew it was to cash in for the bucks during his 2019 free-agent season. That’s fine. That’s his right. That’s his prerogative.

But, if you’re going to take that stance, don’t insult us with how badly you want to pitch this season and in the playoffs. If 180 innings is your ceiling then you, and the Mets, should have handled things differently this season. (He’s at 171.2 innings now.)

The Mets are going out of their way saying Harvey’s innings aren’t a distraction. Maybe they aren’t once the game starts, but we can’t escape hearing about it. This remains an issue as the Mets bear down on their first playoff appearance since 2006 because nothing has been defined.

“We’re all on the same page,’’ Collins said. “We need to get him out there a little more consistently. … If we get in the postseason, we’ve got to have Matt Harvey ready to pitch, and I don’t need him to have 15 days off. So we’ve got to come up with a plan that’s going to get him out there a little bit more.’’

Today is Sept. 14, and now you say you have to come up with a plan? If the Mets had a plan entering the season, they wouldn’t have to be scrambling for one with the playoffs less than four weeks away.

There are many unanswered questions:

Who will be in the playoff rotation? Will it include Jon Niese or Bartolo Colon? If Harvey is there, but limited, will they need to carry an extra reliever at the expense of a position player?

If Harvey goes into the playoffs with too much rust, how will it affect him? It’s the playoffs and one bad start can mean the difference between winter and the next round?

If the Mets advance, what will happen with Harvey in the next round?

With their pitching, the Mets could run the table. But, Harvey is part of that pitching. If they get to the World Series, what is Harvey’s availability?

This is something that shouldn’t be on the Mets’ plate at this point.  If the Mets can’t go into the playoffs without Harvey being an issue, perhaps the best option is to leave him off the playoff roster. This would give him plenty of rest for his start next March in Port St. Lucie.

Sep 09

Things Couldn’t Have Worked Out Better For Matt Harvey

It was Matt Harvey‘s worst outing of the season for the Mets, yet he came out smelling like roses. He’s the guy who doesn’t find loose change under his seat cushions, but $20 bills. At least so far, it has been that way.

HARVEY: Comes up golden. (Getty)

HARVEY: Comes up golden. (Getty)

We don’t know yet how much Harvey will pitch in September and his availability for the playoffs, but things are looking good for now. After four days in which he took a public relations hit for the innings flap issue after agent Scott Boras dared remind GM Sandy Alderson of the 180 innings magic number.

The print media took its shot at Harvey, but SNY continued to treat him with kid gloves as it failed to acknowledge Boras doesn’t say anything without Harvey’s knowledge. Guys, Boras is Harvey’s mouthpiece.

Harvey wants to tread lightly in September and pitch in October, but that might not be possible to his liking. However, Tuesday’s game and the completed sweep tonight gives the Mets a seven-game lead with 23 games remaining, to create a gap seemingly wide enough where missing Harvey a couple of times might be possible without creating any angst. Whether it is Logan Verrett or Steven Matz, it doesn’t matter.

The key here is Harvey got what he wanted with a limited amount of friction from the front office. Even a loss or two might not be the end of the world now. Had Harvey been beaten, he would have gotten all sorts of questions if the controversy was a distraction.

However, if Harvey only starts two more games – against the Yankees and Washington as reported – the question of how sharp he’ll be could become an issue. But for now, that’s just conjecture. For now, the Harvey issue doesn’t seem so intense.



Sep 08

SNY Misses Boat On Harvey Coverage

Normally, I buy into most things SNY commentators Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez say about the Mets, but they missed the essence of the Matt Harvey fiasco when they both took the easy way out and ripped agent Scott Boras. It’s not that Boras doesn’t do some infuriating things, but in this case he was only doing his job, which is looking after Harvey.

SNY:  Keith and Ron miss boat on Harvey issue. (SNY)

SNY: Keith and Ron miss boat on Harvey issue. (SNY)

Blaming Boras is easy because he’s an outsider, but the real architects for this mess are Mets GM Sandy Alderson and Harvey. We know of the financial link between the Mets and SNY, but that never prevented Hernandez and Darling from being critical of the Mets’ performance on the field before.

I wrongly thought they would shed significant light on this issue, but they have not.

As former players, both are acutely aware of the athlete-agent relationship, and should have pointed out Boras works for Harvey and doesn’t operate in a vacuum. Boras doesn’t do anything without Harvey knowing about it, and however the story got out, Harvey knew it was coming. How could he not? Instead, Harvey acted like the innocent victim and let Alderson take the heat.

I’m not buying for a second Alderson was confused about how the innings limit included the postseason and wasn’t just for the regular season. Say what you want about Alderson, he’s not naive enough to make that mistake.

I’m also not buying Alderson’s lame excuse he wasn’t counting on the Mets being in the postseason. Huh? This year, 2015, was what they’ve pointed to since Harvey was injured. When you talk about contending, your goal is the postseason – and subsequently the World Series. So, you must calculate six postseason starts – two in each round – and include that in the 34 starts he would normally make during a season.

That would be 28 in the regular season and six in the playoffs. If you figure six innings a start – which is on the low side – that’s 204 for the year. As I suggested numerous times, the Mets needed to come up with, and announce so there is no misunderstanding, a concrete number. Hell, the Mets had the schedule since November so there was plenty of time to figure this out.

Of course, the primary reason Alderson didn’t do this was to avoid the inevitable conflict with Harvey about limiting his innings. It’s one thing to admire Harvey’s desire to pitch, but his judgment is in question, and that includes complaining about the six-man rotation.

So, this issue isn’t Boras’ doing, but that of Alderson not being forceful enough with Harvey to construct a plan, and for Harvey fighting any innings limits; for having his agent broach the inevitable issue; and not being stand-up about his responsibility in this mess.

Both Hernandez and Darling are smart enough to recognize this. Too bad they picked the most controversial issue of the season to lose their voices.


Sep 06

If Dispute Not Resolved, Mets Should Explore Trading Harvey

It’s too late for the Mets to do what they should have done with Matt Harvey, but the timing might be right for them to do what they now should do.

Torched, and rightfully so, by the New York media for his comments that suggested only 14 innings were left in his season, Harvey, posted on Derek Jeter‘s website Sunday he would indeed pitch for the Mets should they reach the postseason.

HARVEY: Credibility in doubt. (MLB)

HARVEY: Credibility in doubt. (MLB)

“As an athlete, when your surgeon explains to you the risks of exceeding a certain number of innings, it can be alarming,” Harvey wrote. “You listen. I love to play baseball, and I love winning even more. I would not give that up for anything. I also know I want to be able to play and win for a long time.

“But there has never been a doubt in my mind: I will pitch in the playoffs. I will be healthy, active and ready to go. I am communicating with my agent, my doctor, [general manager] Sandy [Alderson] and the entire Mets organization. I can assure everyone that we’re all on the same page.”

We shall see.

I’d like to give Harvey the benefit of doubt, but his recent track record for believability isn’t strong.

Harvey’s next start is Tuesday – as he repeated ad nauseam Saturday – and if he and GM Sandy Alderson aren’t on the same page by the time he takes the mound, the Mets should take a hard line, aggressive stance with their diva. It should also be noted that if Harvey sides with Alderson, he would be going against agent Scott Boras and Dr. James Andrews.

I’m not sure Harvey is ready to take that stance.

If Harvey and the Mets don’t work things out and the innings limit remains at 180, Alderson should make it clear the pitcher will make his next start in five days and then tell him to disappear to remove the specter of his distraction.

Harvey’s comments Saturday regarding Boras made it clear his intent is to not leave a dollar on the table. At least, that’s his impression.

I never believed Harvey would re-sign with the Mets when he becomes a free agent in three years and still don’t. This flap might assure that scenario. So, if Harvey gets his 180 innings and is proclaimed healthy, considering he has a reasonable salary and the Mets’ starting depth, it might be time to explore the trade market.

Sep 05

Harvey Not Blameless In Mess

On a day Matt Harvey was in the process of possibly letting down his Mets teammates, they were picking up their diva pitcher. As Harvey let the Mets and their fans twist in the wind about the number of innings he’ll throw this season, the Mets and Bartolo Colon were rocking the Marlins Saturday night.

Harvey said the politically correct thing about concentrating on Tuesday’s start in Washington and added:  “As far as being out there, being with my teammates and playing, I’m never going to want to stop.”

HARVEY: Diva not blameless. (AP)

HARVEY: Diva not blameless. (AP)

However, the stop sign is set at 180 innings and Harvey has already thrown 166.1. Harvey reiterated agent Scott Boras’ comments from Friday his surgeon, Dr. James Andrews, had set a limit for him.

Presumably, Andrews set this limit entering the season, which would mean the Mets and Harvey knew all along. Given that, why wouldn’t the Mets come up with a defined plan and why would Harvey fight the Mets on the six-man rotation and push at times during the season to pitch when the prudent thing would have been to rest him?

However, that question suggests Andrews came up with this number recently. When asked numerous times this season, neither Harvey nor the Mets acknowledged the limit confirmed Saturday, with less than a month remaining in the season.

“I’m the type of person, I never want to put the ball down,” Harvey told reporters. “Obviously I hired Scott, my agent, and went with Dr. Andrews as my surgeon because I trusted them to keep my career going and keep me healthy. As far as the surgeon and my agent having my back and kind of looking out for the best of my career, they’re obviously speaking their mind about that.”

It must be noted the interests of Boras and Andrews don’t coincide with that of the Mets.

Meanwhile, the Mets are saying Harvey will make four more starts and work a “reasonable” number of postseason innings. However, they have not defined “reasonable.” Also, Harvey would not say if he would exceed 180 innings or would be around for the postseason.

However, in an incredible amount of hubris, Harvey said: “The biggest thing is getting us to where we need to be. I’m thrilled that we’re into this conversation because that means I’m healthy and pitching and had a lot of innings throughout the year.”

Harvey said he spoke with Andrews and his agent, but not whether he spoke with Mets GM Sandy Alderson. Reportedly, that will occur Monday in Washington.

“Dr. Andrews said his limit was 180,” Harvey said. “That’s what Scott, or Dr. Andrews had said. But, for me, I’ve got 166 innings. I don’t know any much more than what I have to do Tuesday. And that’s go out and beat the Nationals.”

How about winning the NL East? Or, how about pitching in the postseason? Harvey didn’t mention either of those things.

Harvey dodged all relevant questions. and instead threw out the same old cliches.

“Like I said, I’m going out Tuesday to try to beat the Nationals,” Harvey said. “That’s our focus right now. I’ve stayed out of it. … I’ve heard both sides. I’ve heard different sides all along. My job as an athlete and as a player and as part of this team is to concentrate on one start at a time.”

One start at a time? What nonsense. Stayed out of it? Please, even more nonsense.

He stayed out of it by squawking about innings and pitch counts? He stayed out of it by pushing to pitch when he was ill and should of rested? He stayed out of it by pushing to stay in games when he should have been pulled? He stayed out of it by complaining about the six-man rotation, which was designed to protect him?

When Andrews came up with 180 innings isn’t sure, but Harvey said it had been “awhile” that it had been reached. Whenever it was, Harvey shouldn’t have done anything this year that would conflict with efforts to conserve his innings, but he clearly did.

No question the Mets mishandled this by bowing down to their diva’s demands, but a major reason why your team could be without Harvey soon is because of the pitcher himself.

If Harvey were as smart and the team player he proclaims to be, the Mets wouldn’t be in this position. They also wouldn’t be in this mess if Alderson if he stood up to the temperamental Harvey.

However, in trying to keep a positive focus on things, if Harvey isn’t available for the postseason, that will leave him time to watch the Rangers’ preseason. I mean, that’s what’s important, right?