Dec 07

Mets Not Players For Cespedes For Multiple Reasons

Let’s face it, the Mets wouldn’t have gotten into the playoffs without Yoenis Cespedes. It is certain now they need to find a way to return without him.

CESPEDES:  Not going to happen. (Getty)

CESPEDES: Not going to happen. (Getty)

ESPN reports Cespedes wants somewhere in the neighborhood of $125 million over six years. That’s clearly the upper East Side, not Flushing. Mets assistant general manager John Ricco said as much at the Winter Meetings in Nashville.

“It’s unlikely right now that he ends up a Met,” Ricco told reporters at the winter meetings. “I think that’s fair to say. I think we will end up meeting with his agent. Right now, I still think he’s looking at a deal that would be north of what we would consider.

“Whether we have a specific meeting to talk about Cespedes, I’m not sure. They have other players. I imagine we’ll meet with them, and as part of that conversation his name will come up. I think right now, in talking with them, and getting feedback from Sandy [Alderson], I would view it as pretty unlikely that we do anything with him. But you never know how the market is going to develop. So I wouldn’t rule it out completely.”

I would and not just because of the money.

After a torrid August, Cespedes’ bat turned silent in the playoffs and he had numerous defensive and fundamental breakdowns. There were also numerous times in which he dogged it running the bases and in the field.

The Mets saw this and must also ask themselves why Cespedes during his brief career has already played with four teams. Three of those teams, the Mets, Detroit and Boston, consider themselves contenders, yet disposed of Cespedes. The fourth, Oakland, didn’t want to spend the money.

If Cespedes’ salary demands were considerably lower and would give the Mets a home team discount, I could see it. But, as with Jose Reyes, he’s not interested in leaving anything on the table.

The Mets’ first outfield priority is a left-handed bat to platoon with Juan Lagares.

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Nov 16

Syndergaard Fourth In Rookie Voting

Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard finished fourth in the NL Rookie of the Year voting today behind Chicago’s Kris Bryant (unanimous winner), Matt Duffy and Jung Ho Kang. The only Mets who realistically have a chance at winning postseason awards are Terry Collins (manager) and Sandy Alderson (executive).

ESPN, citing the Pace Law School in White Plains as its source, projects Matt Harvey to make $4.4 million in arbitration this winter, Other arbitration-eligible Mets are Lucas Duda, Jeurys Familia and Addison Reed.

 

Sep 17

Cespedes’ Comments About Staying A Smokescreen

What can we make of Yoenis Cespedes‘ statement about wanting to stay with the Mets? Not much, because what a player says in September rarely has any bearing about what happens in December.

CESPEDES: Comments about staying posturing. (Getty)

CESPEDES: Comments about staying posturing. (Getty)

If his comments carried any weight, he would tell his agent, “call Sandy Alderson because I want to sign right away.” Of course, that would never happen, especially with Cespedes having dumped agent Adam Katz in favor of rapper-turned-agent Jay Z of Roc Nation Sports.

Roc Nation Sports represents Robinson Cano, and the method is familiar. Roc Nation persuaded Cano to dump agent Scott Boras, and he did the same with Cespedes and his agent, Katz.

Well, what if Cespedes really wants to stay with the Mets?

Just like Cano wanted to sign with the Mets? Right. Jay Z met with the Wilpons about Cano, who signed a 10-year, $240-million deal with Seattle. There’s no way he was worth that and Cespedes isn’t worth the projected $175-million to stay in Flushing.

Based on the Cano case, Jay Z used the Mets to drive up the price with Seattle, which could also be the scenario with Cespedes.

I’ll believe Cespedes wants to stay with the Mets when he signs on the bottom line. Until then, everything is up in the air.

Everything.

Sep 08

Mets Must Capitalize On Cespedes Extension

No matter what happens tonight in Washington, the Mets received a huge break because Major League Baseball and the Players Association reached an agreement that would allow them to pursue outfielder Yoenis Cespedes throughout the offseason. Cespedes’ contract limited the Mets to a five-day window after the World Series to sign him.

According to the original provision, the Mets wouldn’t have been allowed to sign Cespedes until May 15, and by that time he would have been signed. Considering their record, there’s no way the Mets would have been able to reach a deal with Cespedes in those five years.

However, Cespedes in under contract now and the Mets have his undivided attention. With how he has produced, he is worth bringing him back, even if it costs a lot.

If Cespedes leaves, the Mets will have the familiar problem of needing a power bat in the outfield. Michael Cuddyer will be gone after 2016 and Curtis Granderson will be gone in two years. All their young pitchers are under their control for several years, so there will be available money.

Another thing worth noting, when a team reaches the playoffs after a long dry spell, it doesn’t experience the benefit until the next year (2016). With the schedule now out and the Mets in the midst of a crucial series with Washington, people are already looking forward to next year.

If the Mets let Cespedes slide through their fingers, there’s no telling how this would impact ticket sales.

Since joining the Mets, July 31, for minor league pitcher Michael Fulmer, Cespedes is hitting .311 with 13 homers and 31 RBI in 34 games. He’s been an impact player since joining the major leagues, so what he’s doing isn’t a fluke.

Alderson earned his money with the trade, but keeping him is the real coup.

Sep 04

Mets’ Spat With Boras Over Harvey Expected

Who can really be surprised the Mets and agent Scott Boras are at odds over Matt Harvey? In this case, I’d love to tell you I told you so, but I told you so.

Word predictably surfaced this week Boras told the Mets to shut down his client at 180 innings, which is 13.2 less than he has now. Why is Boras throwing out a number? Quite simply because Mets GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins – in all their wisdom – failed to do so at the start of the season and instead decided to go with monitoring his innings with a “play it by ear” format.

BORAS: In dispute with Mets. (AP)

BORAS: In dispute with Mets over Harvey. (Getty).

Reportedly, Boras contacted Alderson with his demands the end of last month. Alderson should tell Boras, in no uncertain terms, he and not Boras runs the Mets.

Alderson told CBS Sports: “For a guy to say to us on the 29th of August, `180 innings and then you’re going to shut him down … don’t call me seven months later and tell me you’re pulling the rug out from under me, not after all we’ve done to protect the player.’ ”

The Mets have done a lot, including throwing over 110 pitches just once. But, they could have done more, such as not permitting him to pitch in the “sore throat” game and not allowing him to pitch into the ninth in a blowout win over the Yankees.

If the Mets defined a plan of limiting Harvey to six innings, it would have saved them 18.1 innings over 14 starts. That total would be more if they shaved one start every two months.

Times have changed and agents have considerably more power in a team’s inner workings than ever before, and it’s not for the better. It’s just the way it is.

The Mets could have handled this better, but that’s something we say frequently about the Alderson regime. But, dealing with Boras is always tenuous at best. This is clearly about money – or, future money – which defines Boras.

Boras’ concern over Harvey’s health is disingenuous, because if he really cared he would have told his client to quit his complaining about the six-man rotation, which is designed to protect the pitcher.

The agent isn’t thinking about the Mets, or the playoffs, but solely his client and the prospects of what he will bring first in arbitration, and later, free agency. The less Harvey throws now, the greater the chance Harvey remains healthy and will cash in.

If you think this is a problem now, just imagine how things will be when Harvey becomes a free agent in 2019.