Aug 05

Tonight’s line-up; Davis to get second opinion.

Last year’s feel good story is feeling his lumps this summer. Knuckleballer R.A. Dickey salvaged the rotation when Oliver Perez was shut down, but has hardly been a surprise this year.

Dickey, tonight’s starter against Atlanta, is 5-9 with a respectable 3.77 ERA – a sign he’s not getting much support – but has two victories to show for his last ten starts.

Dickey often manages to give the Mets innings, going at least six innings in 17 of his 22 starts.

Here’s tonight’s lineup against the Braves:

Jose Reyes, SS

Justin Turner, 2B

Daniel Murphy, RF

David Wright, 3B

Angel Pagan, CF

Jason Bay, LF
Lucas Duda, RF

Josh Thole, C

R.A. Dickey, RP

NOTEBOOK: As suggested here earlier, the news isn’t encouraging for Ike Davis, who said microfracture surgery is an option. Davis will get another non-Mets opinion Tuesday. Meanwhile, Sandy Alderson said the plan is wait at least another month before deciding what to do. It would give Davis one more month of recovery and rehab if the surgery was done now. February will be quicker than you think.

Johan Santana is with the team during the home stand, but will not throw.

 

Aug 05

Mets shouldn’t push it with Santana and Davis.

Johan Santana has a fatigued left shoulder, which is better than another tear. Ike Davis is to be re-evaluated, but he already said he doubts he’ll play again this season.

SANTANA: No need to rush him.

Given the Mets’ history with injuries, I don’t see how anybody can be surprised by any of this, and certainly not feel disappointed about the prospect of not seeing either again this season.

If anything, I don’t want to see either this year.

I want Santana to keep working at getting stronger and not worrying about pitching again this year. It’s not ideal, but I can live with him not knowing until spring training. Even should Santana pitch again, the Mets should carry on their offseason business with the assumption he’ll breakdown again and not reach his former level.

Can you say Chien-Ming Wang?

There’s nothing to be gained by pushing Santana. There will be no playoffs, no pennant race. Let him rehab, rest and hope for the best next year.

It’s the prudent thing to do.

As far as Davis is concerned, all I see with trying to get him back is what happened with Carlos Beltran. They rehabbed him and had him come back for a few meaningless games in September and he ended up having the surgery anyway and came back late.

Learn from the past. Let the doctors take care of Davis now so at least he’ll have a chance to be ready for spring training.

Do you remember one of the vows when Sandy Alderson took over about being smarter with injuries? Well, here’s an opportunity to treat and take care of two key players.

Trying to get them back this year is just asking for trouble.

 

Jul 15

Would sweeping the Phillies make a difference regarding Beltran?

Even should the Mets sweep the Phillies, I’m not buying it will have a great impact on what Sandy Alderson does  with Carlos Beltran. If he gets a deal, he’ll take it, regardless of where the Mets are in the standings.

Make no mistake, the Mets are in the rebuilding mode Alderson vowed when he came to town. The Mets are playing better than anticipated, which has shed a different light on things in the eyes of the fans, but hasn’t altered Alderson’s plan.

The trade of Francisco Rodriguez, and the possible trading of Beltran, has been met with more resistance than expected largely because of the Mets playing .500 ball and Jose Reyes’ strong first half. Those two things have given the impression of the Mets being a contender, but they still have the same issues as they had coming out of spring training.

Jul 13

Alderson dances around trade and future.

What else was Sandy Alderson going to say?

In a classic case of GM-Speak, Alderson said today in a conference call, “I certainly wouldn’t draw any conclusions from this transaction,’’ regarding this morning’s trade of Francisco Rodriguez to Milwaukee.

ALDERSON: Dances the dance.

 

 

He might be the only one.

This was about dumping salary, totally understandable considering the Mets didn’t want to pick up Rodriguez’s $17.5 million option. How well the Mets have played was irrelevant because clearing themselves of the option was their primary objective, although Alderson downplayed this issue.

He wasn’t believable.

Alderson insisted the Mets’ goal the rest of the way will be winning games, but that’s a tough sell considering he just traded their closer, and is actively looking to move Carlos Beltran, and wouldn’t say no to anybody asking about Jose Reyes.

Trading Rodriguez offers payroll flexibility, but realistically we’re only talking about 2012, and Reyes reportedly will seek six or seven years.

Alderson said there’s no connection between Rodriguez and possibly trading Beltran, but what other conclusion can you make? The Mets want to shave payroll and aren’t a realistic contender, so the fire sale seems the only realistic way for this season to play itself out.

Anybody can see that, so why can’t Alderson just admit it and spare us the GM-Speak?

 

Jun 22

Today in Mets’ History: Franco climbs save list.

John Franco has always been one of the more popular Mets. You can catch him on SNY from time to time.

FRANCO: Hall worthy?

On this date in 1994, Franco passed Dave Righetti for the most saves by a lefthander with 253 in a 5-2 victory at Atlanta.

Franco finished with 424 saves, an average of 26 per season playing for the Reds, Mets an Astros. He had eight seasons of 30 or more saves – five of them with the Mets – with a career best 39 with Cincinnati in 1988.

That season was one of three times in which he led the National League in saves.

Franco is fourth on the career list behind Trevor Hoffman, Mariano Rivera and Lee Smith, but has received little consideration for the Hall of Fame, largely because he has one save in 15 postseason appearances.

Franco has always been a straight shooter, which accounts for much of his popularity among Mets fans.

During the summer of 2009 when the Mets were hit hard by injuries and struggling, Franco wanted to hear none of the excuses and pointed in a different direction.

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