May 07

Reading The Murphy Tea Leaves

The thing that stands out about the recent Daniel Murphy trade rumors is the lack of denials from the New York Mets. None. Sure, scouts look at players all the time and we shouldn’t be surprised San Francisco was in over the weekend to look at Murphy. It stands to reason considering the Giants have a Pablo Sandoval size hole at third base.

It is no coincidence Murphy was moved to third to be showcased when Dilson Herrera was promoted from Triple-A Las Vegas.

MURPHY: Sliding on out of here? (AP)

MURPHY: Sliding on out of here? (AP)

It also comes as no surprise the Mets have made no overtures to extend Murphy’s contract. And, they have had plenty of time.

It all makes sense, except for one thing: The Mets are playing winning baseball and Murphy, although not hitting well, does have a pile of RBI since he was moved into a run-producing slot in the batting order.

So, what happens in the next couple of weeks when David Wright comes off the disabled list? Especially if Herrera is hitting?

Who can’t see the Mets trying to unload Murphy?

But, if theMets accept token players, minor league scraps, if you will, while having their best season in six years, if should tell you a lot about GM Sandy Alderson and what management really considers as a priority.

My guess is winning isn’t ranked first.

May 04

Are Mets Too Eager To Deal Murphy And Gee?

Scouts were in town over the weekend to watch the Mets Daniel Murphy for the purpose of trading for the third baseman. Specifically the Giants, who didn’t bring back Pablo Sandoval last winter, have the most interest.

The Mets really aren’t in a good position when it comes to possibly trading Murphy because there’s little doubt they will bring him back next year. Given that, unless there’s a line out the door of suitors for Murphy, the Giants probably won’t have to come up with a big package.

Under the Sandy Alderson era, the Mets have traditionally asked for too much in the trade market, and the same might happen again if it were solely about Murphy. What the Mets might think about doing is making that package include Dillon Gee, whom they are also eager to deal.

This could work because the Giants have pitching depth issues and need another arm.

While it is easy to understand why San Francisco, which is having a down year, might want Murphy and Gee, the motivation for the Mets to deal one or both is to clear salary and make room for younger talent. However, if the Mets are to be the contender they hope to be this season they will be gambling their young talent of infielder Dilson Herrera and possibly Noah Syndergaard will adjust to the demands of the major leagues and be able to immediately give them what Gee and Murphy can.

The Mets want to get something for Murphy and Gee before they leave, which is understandable. But, I would rather the Mets make the playoffs and they walk and get nothing, than dealing them now and missing October.

Seems to me the Mets are too eager to get rid of them.

 

 

Apr 08

Today In Mets History: Seaver Wins Behind Kingman, Torre

On this date in 1975, backed by Dave Kingman’s first homer as a Met and Joe Torre’s RBI single, Tom Seaver out-dueled Steve Carlton to defeat Philadelphia, 2-1, on Opening Day at Shea Stadium.

SEAVER: Beats Carlton in classic.

SEAVER: Beats Carlton in classic.

Felix Milan lead off the ninth with a single to right, moved to second on a walk to John Milner and scored on Torre’s single to left.

You know about Seaver, the greatest player in franchise history and a Hall of Famer with 311 career victories, with 198 coming as a Met. He also pitched for Cincinnati (acquired in a 1977 trade from the Mets), the White Sox and Boston.

Hard to believe Tom Terrific is 70 years old.

Torre played three seasons for the Mets (1975-77) and become their manager in 1977. He played 18 years in the majors and finished with 2,324 hits and a .297 average.

Torre managed five seasons with the Mets (winning 286 games), three with Atlanta, six with the Cardinals, three with Los Angeles, and 12 with the Yankees, where his teams won 1,173 games, six pennants and four World Series titles. Those numbers with Yankees sent him into the Hall of Fame.

As for Kingman, the overall No. 1 pick with the Giants, played six years for the Mets, with whom he hit 154 of his 442 career homers. He also played for San Francisco, Oakland, the Cubs, San Diego, California Angels and Yankees before retiring after the 1986 season.

While Seaver and Torre are in Cooperstown, it would have been interesting to see if Kingman would have made it had he hit 500 home runs.

BOX SCORE

ON DECK: Previewing Jacob deGrom‘s first start.

Feb 17

Today In Mets History: Roger Craig Born

One of original Mets, pitcher Roger Craig, was born in Durham, N.C., on this date in 1930.

CRAIG: Happy Birthday to an original Met.

CRAIG: Happy Birthday to an original Met.

Craig was signed by Brooklyn in 1950 and broke in with the Dodgers five years later. He accompanied the team to Los Angeles and spent four years there before being selected in the expansion draft by the Mets prior to the 1962 season and pitched two years in the Polo Grounds and compiled a 15-46 record with a 4.14 ERA.

He became the answer to a trivia question when he started and lost the first game in Mets’ history.

Craig left the Mets following the 1963 season and went on to pitch with St. Louis, Cincinnati and Philadelphia and retired after 1966 with a 74-98 record, .430 ERA and 1.334 WHIP.

After he retired, Craig went on to manage San Francisco from 1986-1990, however his real niche was as a pitching coach where he taught the split-finger fastball.

Box Score: Craig’s first game as a Met.

Jan 30

The Playoffs Aren’t Out Of The Question

The latest issue of Baseball Prospectus projects the Mets to finish in second place in the NL East behind Washington with an 82-80 record, which would be their first winning season since 2008.

That would be good enough to be tied with Chicago for sixth place in the National League, but not make the playoffs for the first time since 2006.

Here how the publication projects the National League:

Los Angeles 97-65

Washington 91-71

St. Louis 89-73

San Francisco 84-78

San Diego 83-79

METS 82-80

Chicago 82-80

Miami 81-81

Pittsburgh 80-82

Cincinnati 79-83

Milwaukee 79-83

Atlanta 74-88

Arizona 74-88

Colorado 72-90

Philadelphia 69-93

 

Last year the Mets were tied for second with Atlanta in the division at 79-83. If the publication were correct, we would be talking of an improvement of three games with a minimum of additions with offseason.

Using the publication’s figures, the Mets need to win at least 84 games to be a wild card. To do that they must improve by five games, and are banking on that happening with the healthy returns of Matt Harvey and David Wright.

When you look at it, that’s an extra five victories a month, which isn’t unrealistic.