Aug 01

Mets Still Talking …

As the trade deadline rapidly approaches, the Mets remain in “buy mode” and as of this morning were still talking with Cincinnati about left-handed hitting corner outfielder Jay Bruce and Milwaukee about catcher Jonathan Lucroy.

Both players have manageable contracts, no-trade clauses that don’t include the Mets and would help their listless offense. They might not help in the way Yoenis Cespedes did last season, but would improve what we’ve been seeing for the better part of three months.

BRUCE: Still hope. (AP)

     BRUCE: Still hope. (AP)

As as far as Lucroy is concerned, those talks might have fizzled by now. The last offer on the table for Lucroy was catcher Travis d’Arnaud and either minor league infielder Dilson Herrera or outfielder Brandon Nimmo (but not both).

However, the Brewers backed off when they appeared to trade Lucroy to Cleveland. Only after Lucroy turned down the trade, were talks revisited. At that time the Brewers might have asked for both Nimmo and Herrera, but that hasn’t been confirmed.

If the Brewers trade Lucroy, it most likely appears it will be to Texas.

As for Bruce, the Mets talked with Cincinnati about him last season before landing Cespedes (they were willing to give up Zack Wheeler). The Mets face competition for Bruce from the San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers. Detroit and the Rangers have also engaged the Reds.

Interestingly, both Bruce and Lucroy could be free-agents this winter if the teams they are with do not pick up their club options for 2017. Of course, by that time the playoffs would have come and gone.

With nothing imminent in terms of obtaining a bat, the Mets are still interested in adding bullpen depth and have been linked to Joe Smith (a former Met now with the Angels) and Jim Johnson (Braves).

Whomever the Mets land, the top priority seems to be a player who is not under contract for next season, which kind of says it all.

 

 

 

Apr 29

Mets Wrap: Historic Third Inning Carries Matz

We can debate the merits of hitting home runs – which manager Terry Collins labels is his team – or if is better to string together hits and walks.

CESPEDES: Connects for slam. (AP)

CESPEDES: Connects for slam. (AP)

The Mets kept the line moving in the third, scoring eight runs before Yoenis Cespedes capped their 12-run third inning, the largest in franchise history, with a grand slam in a 13-1 rout of the San Francisco Giants.

While both attacks have their upside, what has also been essential to the Mets’ April success has been the consistency of their batting order. In previous seasons rarely did the Mets go back-to-back in consecutive games with the same order.

It wouldn’t be unusual for them to have six different lineups in a week. Not this year. So far, in 21 games the Mets started the following:

No. 1: Curtis Granderson, 20 games.

No. 2: David Wright, 17 games.

No. 3: Michael Conforto: 13 games.

No. 4: Lucas Duda: 11 games.

No. 5: Neil Walker: 13 games.

No. 6: Conforto and Walker: 7 games each.

No. 7: Asdrubal Cabrera: 13 games.

No. 8: Travis d’Arnaud: 8 games.

No. 9: Pitcher: 21 games.

“A lot of good things are happening right now,” Collins told reporters. “I like our lineup.”

Cespedes has been the No. 3 hitter eight times, but that changed after Conforto was moved to the third spot. Cespedes has also been the cleanup seven times. As the season progresses, Cespedes will get the lion’s share of starts hitting cleanup, with Duda batting more in the fifth spot and Walker hitting sixth.

“He’s a great player,” Collins said of Cespedes. “He takes the pressure off everybody.”

When an offense juggles its lineup on a regular basis there’s little chance to develop consistency. However, so far this April you can see where Collins has benefitted with a steady batting order.

Such things are conducive to hitting tears and winning streaks, such as the Mets are on now.

METS GAME WRAP

 Game: #21 Record: 14-7 Streak: W 7

 SUMMARY: Steven Matz pitched out of early trouble, which seemed like a big deal at the time, but it was dwarfed by the Mets’ 12-run third inning, the largest in the 55-year history of the franchise.

KEY MOMENT: The Giants had chances in the first and third to do damage against Matz, who pitched out of it and coasted for six scoreless innings.

 THUMBS UP: Cespedes drove in six runs in the third with a two-run single and grand slam. … Two more hits by Conforto. … Also two hits by Cespedes, Walker and Cabrera. … More solid relief pitching. … They were 9-for-16 with runners in scoring position.

THUMBS DOWN: Why was David Wright still in the game with the Mets having a 13-1 lead in the seventh? Why did he play all nine innings on a cold and damp night? He should have been taken out after the third. Collins said he didn’t consider pulling Wright, saying he wanted to get him at-bats against Giants’ lefty relievers Steven Okert and Javier Lopez in preparation to facing Madison Bumgarner Sunday. … Even so, Wilmer Flores needed to play somewhere. … Mets pitchers walked six. … As long as the Mets count pitches, it will be an issue: Matz has to do better than throwing 110 pitches in six innings.

EXTRA INNINGS: Cespedes has at least one extra-base hit in nine straight games. … Matz is 7-1 lifetime in his short career. … Friday’s game was the first of 17 straight without an off day. … The Mets have hit 31 homers in April. The club record is 33 in 2006. … Conforto has reached base in 16 straight games. … The bullpen has given up three runs in the last seven games.

QUOTEBOOK: “We were not missing the mistake pitches and were having fun out there. When we’re having fun, it’s easy.’’ – Conforto on the Mets’ historic third inning.

BY THE NUMBERS: 45: Duration of the Mets’ 12-run third inning in minutes. Fifteen Mets went to the plate.

NEXT FOR METS: The second game of this series is Saturday afternoon, with the Giants’ Matt Cain (0-2, 6.43) going against Jacob deGrom (2-0, 1.54). On Sunday, Bumgarner (2-2, 3.64) starts against Noah Syndergaard (2-0, 1.69).

 

Apr 29

April 29, Mets Lineup Against Giants

The Mets will attempt to extend their winning streak to seven tonight against the San Francisco Giants at Citi Field.

Here’s the lineup behind Steven Matz:

Mets

Curtis Granderson, RF

David Wright, 3B

Michael Conforto, LF

Yoenis Cespedes, CF

Lucas Duda, 1B

Neil Walker, 2B

Asdrubal Cabrera, SS

Kevin Plawecki, C

Matz, LP

COMMENTS: Isn’t it great the Mets are pretty much playing with the same lineup every game? Sure beats the juggling Terry Collins had to do in recent years because of injuries and players underperforming.

 

 

 

Apr 13

Today In Mets’ History: Lose First Home Opener

National League baseball returned to New York on this date in 1962 in front of 12,447 freezing fans on a blustery day at the Polo Grounds. The Mets lost 4-3 to Pittsburgh.

Can you believe it? The Mets only drew 12,447 people in the first home in their history.

Frank Thomas hit the first home homer. Pitcher Sherman Jones – who took the loss – had the first home hit in franchise history.

The opened the first season two days earlier with an 11-4 loss in St. Louis.

The Mets would lose their first nine games before their first victory in franchise history at Pittsburgh. They would finish April at 3-13, 9.5 games out of first place.

The Mets finished in last place that season with a 40-120 record, only 60.5 games behind the San Francisco Giants.

Please follow me on Twitter.

Feb 28

Today In Mets History: Dave Kingman Signed

On this day in Mets’ history in 1975, the contract of outfielder and first baseman Dave Kingman was purchased from the San Francisco Giants. The 6-foot-6 Kingman, nicknamed Kong for his prodigious strength and power, was to give the Mets the fearsome hitter they had never had this early in their existence.

“He was going to make us a winner,’’ said Joe, a life-long Mets’ fan. “He had such awesome power. We had never had a guy like that before.’’

KINGMAN: Hit 154 homers at a Met.

KINGMAN: Hit 154 homers at a Met.

During his 17-year career, Kingman played six seasons with the Mets, more than any other team. He gave the Mets the power they wanted with 154 home runs. However, the all-or-nothing Kingman also hit .219 with a .287 on-base percentage, and with only 389 RBI and just 211 walks in comparison to 672 strikeouts. He had more strikeouts than hits (509) with the Mets.

In addition to the San Francisco and the Mets, Kingman played for Oakland, the Cubs, San Diego, the Angels and Yankees. Kingman had two stints with the Mets (1975-77 and 1981-83).

Kingman also struck out a lot in his interactions with fans and the media. Of all the things Kingman is known for, perhaps most disturbing was sending a live rat to Susan Fornoff, a female reporter covering the Athletics.

Kingman hit 30 or more homers seven times, including 48 in 1979 with the Cubs and 37 in 1982 with the Mets, when he lead the National League in homers.

Kingman also struck out 1,816 times – an average of 152 times a season – and in 14 years struck out at least 100 times, and eight times fanned at least 125 times. Only once, in 1985, did he draw as many as 60 walks.

History is filled with numerous all-or-nothing sluggers like Kingman, such as Adam Dunn, Greg Vaughn, Frank Howard, Rob Deer, Mark Reynolds and a case can also be made to lump former Met George Foster into that group.

Kingman’s 154 homers ranks fifth on the club’s all-time list, behind Darryl Strawberry, David Wright, Mike Piazza and Howard Johnson.

Kingman finished with 442 career homers and speaking at the closing of Shea Stadium, said if he played longer: “I’m sure I could have hit 500 (home runs). That’s all right. I’m very happy with (my career). I enjoyed my time in the big leagues.’’

Prior to the steroid era, 500 homers used to be an automatic ticket into the Hall of Fame, along with 300 pitching victories and 3,000 hits. Had Kingman played two more years and reached that milestone he would have been an interesting test case.

As a Hall of Fame voter, I wouldn’t give him my vote because his numbers other than homers were terribly weak and non-deserving.

ON DECK:  Mets Matters: Today’s news and notes.