Nov 12

Already Missing Colon

Don’t you miss him already? I do. Bartolo Colon, who helped carry the Mets into the postseason the last two years, moved on to Atlanta.

The Braves will pay Colon $12.5 million, a figure the Mets had no intention of coming close to paying. The Mets paid Colon $7.5 million last year to lead their young vaunted staff with 15 victories.

COLON: Will miss him. (FOX Sports)

COLON: Will miss him. (FOX Sports)

One could surmise the Mets passed on Colon to save their pennies to give to Yoenis Cespedes. Really, can there be any other reason?

When you look at how some teams are spending, and how they figure to spend, you have to be disappointed in seeing the Mets let Colon go without much of an effort. It’s especially disappointing because Cespedes is likely to leave anyway.

Before the 2017 season is over, there will be a time the Mets will need Colon.

Sure, his at-bats brought comic relief, and his homer in San Diego was one of the most memorable moments of the season, as was his behind-the-back flip to first in 2015. However, what Colon should best be remembered for was his willingness to always take the ball and gut out innings, a quality that helped him lead the Mets with 44 victories over the last three seasons.

The Mets signed Colon as a stopgap when Matt Harvey was injured in 2013, but he wound up being their ace in that span. As promising as Jacob deGrom and Noah Syndergaard are, neither has been as reliable as the 43-year-old with the funky delivery and always-present smile.

But, none of that was enough to convince the Mets to bring him back despite having four of their young pitchers coming off surgery; another, Syndergaard, having bone spurs in his elbow; and although Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman have promise, their window has been small.

Maybe it will work out for the Mets, and I hope he reaches his goals of becoming the all-time winningest Latin American-born pitcher next season. With a 232-162 record in 19 seasons, he is third behind Dennis Martinez (245) and Juan Marichal (243).

I’m sorry it won’t be with the Mets.

 

Sep 15

Mets Should Give Verrett Sunday’s Start

The Mets are undecided as to Sunday’s starter against Minnesota, but manager Terry Collins has several options – all of them lacking.

Of their potential choices, rushing Jacob deGrom or Steven Matz – or even splitting a start by using both – is the least appealing in my mind.

VERRETT: My choice for Sunday. (AP)

VERRETT: My choice for Sunday. (AP)

The Mets have to ask this question: If this were May, would they rush them back?

I’m saying no. Under normal circumstances, both would get more rehab time, including a rehab assignment in the minor leagues. However, with the minor league season over, the latter isn’t an option.

As it is, Matz will have surgery to treat the bone spur in his elbow this winter. As much as they want to pitch, and for how badly the Mets – and these players – want to reach the postseason, the last thing they should do is gamble with their health.

Beating the Twins isn’t as important as waiting longer and having them ready for the final two weeks and the postseason. Should they lose Sunday to the Twins and miss the playoffs by a game, well, that’s the risk they’ll have to take.

Is winning worth the risk of deGrom possibly having Tommy John surgery and maybe missing 2017?

What are Collins’ other choices?

* Collins could move up Noah Syndergaard a day, but Collins said he doesn’t want that option. And, let’s not forget Syndergaard also has a bone spur and surgery hasn’t been discounted.

* That turn in the rotation belongs to Rafael Montero. After his last start, Collins immediately said Montero wouldn’t pitch. While, I’m not against that, Collins probably should have waited a day or two before committing to not using Montero. He could go back on his initial decision, but that would make him look bad. Very bad.

* A third option is going back to Logan Verrett, who has pitched well as a spot starter in the past. Verrett was shelled in his last start, Aug. 12 against San Diego, when he gave up eight runs in 2.2 innings. However, he has started 12 of the 33 games in which he’s pitched. Collins has gotten good starts from Verrett in the past, and surely he’d take five innings, something he’s done six times already this year.

* Another option is lefty Sean Gilmartin, who produced as a Rule Five draft pick last year. Gilmartin has one career start for the Mets, and that was last season.

* Gabriel Ynoa is a possibility, but his 15.19 ERA and 2.44 WHIP in six appearances (5.1 innings) is hardly endorsement worthy.

* Collins’ final option is to start either Gilmartin or Montero and using the other as the first reliever out of the pen.

My first option would be Verrett based on experience and previous success in that role. My second choice would be a combination of Verrett, Montero and Gilmartin.

I don’t want to gamble with deGrom and/or Matz, or move Syndergaard. Let’s face it, regardless of whom the Mets start, they should be expected to beat the Twins, who have the worst record in the majors.

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Aug 14

Mets Lineup, Aug. 14, Against Padres

Greetings. The Mets will field their 93rd different lineup today against San Diego at Citi Field. In what says it all about the 2016 Mets, only two players, second baseman Neil Walker and lefty Steven Matz, were either in the Opening Day lineup or roster.

Here’s the batting order and the projection of where they’ll be in 2017:

Jose Reyes – SS: Has contract for 2017, but where he’ll play is to be determined.

Ty Kelly – LF: Likely in the minor leagues.

Walker – 2B: Can leave after this year. Mets interested in bringing him back.

Jay Bruce – RF: Acquired from Cincinnati at deadline. Team has player option.

Wilmer Flores – 1B: Opened season on bench. Same role projected.

T.J. Rivera – 3B: Opened season in minors. Could make team as reserve.

Alejandro De Aza – CF: Opened season on bench. Could be out of the organization.

Rene Rivera – C: Acquired in trade. Could be out of the organization.

Matz – LHP: In Opening Day rotation. Expected to have surgery in offseason on elbow.

Aug 12

Three Keys Tonight For Mets

The pressure of trying to win two in a row is thankfully off for tonight after having been swept in a three-game Citi Field series against Arizona. The 9-0 loss prompted a rant by manager Terry Collins, who said the Mets needed to start getting after it tonight.

It prompted three keys for tonight’s game against San Diego.

Did the message sink in? Collins said jobs are on the line and things have to turn around NOW. Did the message sink in with the players or did it roll off their backs?

Verrett needs a big game: Logan Verrett has no decisions in four of his last five starts He didn’t make it out of the fourth in his last one. The Mets need innings from him.

Where’s the offense? The Mets had 17 hits in the three-game series with the Diamondbacks. Neil Walker is the only bat opposing pitchers respect.

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Aug 12

What’s Your Confidence Level In Mets After Collins’ Rant

The key to a successful managerial rant and closed door meeting is to have a quality starter going next, but the Mets have Logan Verrett tonight against San Diego. Then again, Noah Syndergaard was supposed to turn things around Thursday.

COLLINS: Did he convince you things would change? (Getty)

COLLINS: Did he convince you things would change? (Getty)

Manager Terry Collins was correct in much of his assessment of his team but whiffed on a very important point: the topic of grinding out at-bats. Such nonsense. Collins said “this team has been about grinding out at-bats the past few years.”

Evidently, he hasn’t watched the same team I have been. With the exception of a few hitters, this team doesn’t grind out at-bats. Grinding out at-bats would entail drawing a few walks, but they are ninth in the National League with 342 walks. Conversely, they are fifth highest with 947 strikeouts.

And please, if I hear one more time things will get better once Yoenis Cespedes gets back I will scream. He can hit baseballs a long way, but he also strikes out too damn much. He might be the Mets’ least disciplined hitter.

To turn things around, the Mets must show signs of life, yet they haven’t won successive games since before the All-Star break. Collins went on about playing baseball “the right way,” but don’t you remember all those times in April and May when he said, almost with pride, “that this team doesn’t play small ball?”

Small ball is playing the game the right way. Small ball is recognizing the value of 27 outs and not giving away eight of them a game with strikeouts. A productive out should not be celebrated, but common place for a winning team. Advancing runners into scoring position is essential, but then again, the Mets are last in the majors hitting with a man in scoring position, so, does it really matter?

This is a team without an offensive clue, and that’s an organizational philosophy. Playing small ball is boring and not in line with the new-age sabremetrics favored by the architect of this team, GM Sandy Alderson, who cares about home runs and doesn’t give strikeouts anything more than a passing glance.

Defensively, there’s little range and players are out of position.

On the mound, the Mets’ rotation – once touted as the best in baseball – is a house of cards. Jacob deGrom and Bartolo Colon are the only reliable starters. Syndergaard and Steven Matz have struggled with bone spurs and if the Mets fall behind any further, consideration should be made to shut them down.

There’s been a long list of injuries, but every team has injuries. The Dodgers don’t have Clayton Kershaw and the Cardinals went without Matt Carpenter and Adam Wainwright. Stephen Strasburg went on Washington’s DL, but catching the Nationals won’t happen. Didn’t the Marlins lose Giancarlo Stanton for awhile?

Championship caliber teams overcome and the Mets don’t. James Loney has helped and so has Kelly Johnson, but Jose Reyes was never the answer, Reyes was a grasp at the past in the hope of forgetting the present. They waited too long before going after Jay Bruce.

Collins promised us that starting today, with Verrett, the Mets were “going after it.”

Collins has promised a lot of things. He promised Michael Conforto would bat third, hit against lefties and play every day. Then he promised he would play in center. Collins promised regular at-bats for Wilmer Flores. He promised he would care for the rotation, but aren’t you waiting for Syndergaard and Matz to pack it in for the year like Matt Harvey?

The Mets were supposed to have an easy second-half schedule, but August will see them in San Francisco and St. Louis, before the get another crack at Miami and Washington.

Collins ranted a good game Thursday, but in the end did nothing to raise my confidence in this team. How about you?

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