Aug 13

Three Mets’ Storylines: On This Night Lady Luck Smiled

Jacob deGrom gave the Mets the kind of performance Saturday they desperately needed from him as they hoped to snap a four-game losing streak. For a long time it looked as if deGrom would come away with another no-decision when Jeurys Familia coughed up the lead.

However, the Mets manufactured the game-winning run in the 11th when Neil Walker scored on Wilmer Flores’ fielder’s choice grounder up the middle to give them a 3-2 victory over the San Diego Padres.

WALKER: Celebrates. (AP)

WALKER: Celebrates. (AP)

The play was set up by Walker’s hustle as he went from first-to-third on James Loney’s bloop single to left.

“That was a heads up play,” a relieved Mets manager Terry Collins said. “This was a good game for us to win.”

The Mets won it on Flores’ grounder up the middle, but instead of trying for the double play, Padres second baseman Ryan Schimpf tried for the play at the plate.

“I thought it was going to be a double play,” Collins said of his first thoughts after the ball was hit.

For a team that has played in back luck lately, this could be a sign things could turn.

DeGrom was brilliant in his effort to pick up his struggling team and took a 1-0 lead into the seventh, but Yangervis Solarte homered with two outs to tie the game.

DeGrom had to be thinking “here we go again,’’ until Kelly Johnson’s pinch-hit sacrifice fly in the bottom of the inning regained the lead for the Mets.

Addison Reed stuffed the Padres in the eighth, but Wil Myers tied the game with two outs in the ninth on a homer off Familia. It was Familia’s third blown save and the first homer he has given up this year.

The other key storylines from the game were Jose Reyes‘ return and Curtis Granderson‘s continuing struggles.

REYES RETURNS: Reyes came off the disabled list, hit leadoff, and played shortstop. He went 0-for-3 and scored on Walker’s single.

Reyes took second on a wild pitch, and on the same play advanced to third on a wild throw by catcher Christian Bethancourt. The sequence illustrated Reyes’ speed, an element the Mets have lacked.

However, later Reyes struck out with a wild swing, an element we’ve often seen from the Mets, and by him frequently in his first tenure here.

GRANDERSON’S FUNK CONTINUES: There’s no let up in Granderson’s miserable season as he went 0-for-5 with a strikeout.

Overall, he is 10-for-77 with RISP, including 2-for-39 with two outs and RISP.

Prior to the game, Collins said Granderson’s playing time might be cut once Yoenis Cespedes returns.

If things continue like this for Granderson maybe the Mets will consider benching him before.

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Apr 22

Today In Mets’ History: Big Day For Seaver

Days don’t get much better than they did for Tom Seaver on this date in 1970.

SEAVER: Strikes out 19 Padres. (AP)

SEAVER: Strikes out 19 Padres. (AP)

Seaver was presented his 1969 Cy Young Award prior to the game and then went out and struck out 19 San Diego Padres in a 2-1 win at Shea Stadium.

The Mets took a 1-0 lead in the first on Ken Boswell’s RBI double.

Al Ferrara homered for San Diego in the second, but the Mets regained the lead, 2-1, on Bud Harrelson’s run-scoring triple.

Seaver gave up two hits and walked two to go along with the 19 strikeouts, including the last ten batters he faced.

Seaver went 18-12 that year with a league-leading 2.82 ERA. Seaver pitched 290.2 innings and lead the league 283 strikeouts. He made the NL All-Star team that season for the fourth straight year and pitched three scoreless innings.

ON DECK: Mets List: Memories From Mets-Braves

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Jan 31

Mets Matters: Five Intriguing Prospects; Ojeda Out; Minaya’s New Job

ESPN ranked the Mets’ farm system as the fourth best in baseball, and with it raised the possibility of which prospects we might see this summer at Citi Field.

This much seems clear, with the Mets vigilantly guarding their minor leaguers’ Super Two status, and barring an injury, the probability is we won’t be seeing these guys prior to June.

Here are five of the more intriguing prospects:

NOAH SYNDERGAARD: He’s the franchises’ top prospect, and with Matt Harvey on an innings watch, we will undoubtedly see him this year, perhaps prior to the All-Star break. Syndergaard averaged just under ten strikeouts per nine innings, but was an unimpressive 9-7.

KEVIN PLAWECKI: The catcher will open the season at Triple-A Las Vegas, but how long he stays there will be dependent on Travis d’Arnaud’s offensive production and if Plawecki can increase his power.

STEVEN MATZ: He split time last season between Single and Double-A, and will likely open the year at Triple-A, meaning Citi Field is possible in September. Being left-handed enhances his chances, especially if the Mets can move Jon Niese.

DILSON HERRERA: He made a positive impression last season and we will see him this year. How soon could depend on how well the Mets do, with a poor first half increasing the possibility of them moving second baseman Daniel Murphy.

BRANDON NIMMO: Because the Mets added Michael Cuddyer this offseason, there’s no rush to elevate Nimmo, their No. 1 pick in 2011. The Mets hoped to have him up by now, and his stock could plummet if he doesn’t show something this season. He hit a combined ten homers last year between St. Lucie and Binghamton, and similar production won’t cut it.

OJEDA OUT AT SNY: Say what you will about the Mets not having enough talent on the field, but they’ve always had top-drawer play-by-play announcers and analysts, both on radio and television. This year they will be short by one with the announcement studio analyst Bobby Ojeda will not return to SNY.

Reportedly, the network is in negotiations with former major league pitcher Nelson Figueroa.

MINAYA TO WORK FOR MLBPA: Former Mets general manager Omar Minaya left his position as a vice president of the San Diego Padres to become a special adviser with the Major League Baseball Players Association.

Minaya’s focus will be on international affairs and game development in the United States.

 

Apr 04

Dillon Gee’s Comeback One Of The Good Stories

The cold didn’t bother Matt Harvey last night, but the Mets will pay close attention this afternoon to Dillon Gee if the temperatures drop during his start against the San Diego Padres.

In the quest of rooting for good stories, Gee is up there in his attempt to come back from emergency surgery to repair a blocked artery in his shoulder that caused his right hand to go numb. Simply, you can’t throw if you can’t feel the ball.

GEE: Takes a big step today.

GEE: Takes a big step today.

“I’ve had no setbacks, zero,’’ said Gee during spring training, where the temperatures were thirty degrees higher than the mid-40s expected today in New York, where the Mets go for a sweep of their season-opening three-game series.

Gee will throw his first major league pitch since undergoing surgery at last year’s All-Star break. He had many of his fears quelled because he was able to throw last September.

“I didn’t want to spend the off-season wondering if I could throw again,” Gee said. “It took a lot off my mind.”

The feeling returned to Gee’s hand, but today will be the coolest weather in which he’s had to pitch. In preparation, Gee is on nitroglycerin tablets to expand the blood vessels and maintain circulation. Command will be the issue if the cold makes it difficult for him to grip the ball.

“I think I’ll be fine,’’ Gee said. “It hasn’t been an issue.’’

Gee will attempt to give the Mets their third straight strong starting effort, following Jon Niese in the opener and Harvey’s 10-strikeout performance last night.

His start is part of the progression that began when he was drafted in the 21st round of the 2007 draft. His first work was out of the bullpen, but by the end of his first season with Single-A Brooklyn he was starting and had a 3-1 record with a 2.28 ERA. Gee moved up to Double-A in 2008 and Triple-A in 2009, but that year ended not with a September call-up by the Mets, but with a torn labrum in his shoulder.

Gee returned strong in 2010 and was brought up by the Mets to make his debut, Sept. 7, and was brilliant in taking a no-hitter into the sixth inning. He eventually gave up a run on two hits. Gee stayed in the rotation and finished 2-2 with a 2.18 ERA in five starts. That first impression wasn’t a fluke as he won his first seven decisions in 2011, and finished at 13-6 with a 4.43 ERA and firmly entrenched in the rotation.

Gee doesn’t have the physical make-up of Harvey or Zack Wheeler, but the Mets like his poise and resiliency. He doesn’t get rattled when things go wrong, as they did in 2012 when he was hit hard and often to have a 5.65 ERA in his first seven starts.

The clot in his shoulder didn’t appear to be the cause of his problems as he rebounded with nine-strikeout games against San Diego and Baltimore and improved to 6-7 at the break. He was supposed to open the second half against Atlanta, but it never happened because he complained of numbness in his arm.

Then came the wonder if he’d ever pitch again. Now there’s no pain, no numbness. Just anticipation.

Feb 21

Some Team Numbers The Mets Must Improve

Winning the World Series is the ultimate definition of a successful season, something Mets fans haven’t experienced in nearly three decades. The checkdown list goes to playing in the Series, to playing in the LCS, to making the playoffs and to just have a winning season.

When you’re the fan of a franchise that hasn’t had a winning season since 2008, what is your definition of a successful summer?

Is it playing .500 or just playing competitive games? Tell me what will define a good season for you.

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