May 16

Mets Routed; David Wright, Terry Collins Clash After DJ Carrasco Pitch

When a team gets clobbered, 8-0, there’s not much analysis. Dillon Gee was hammered, and it wasn’t the first time. Also, the offense took the night off. The nugget of interest came in the bottom of the seventh when Terry Collins pulled David Wright and Daniel Murphy, the Mets’ two most productive hitters.

CARRASCO: Idiot.

Normally, you’d think he was giving his players rest during a lost cause except for the timing.

In the top of the inning, reliever D.J. Carrasco gave up a homer to Rickie Weeks then drilled Ryan Braun on the next pitch. So much for being subtle. Carrasco was immediately ejected, as he should have been, but everybody knows it won’t end there. The Brewers must get their pound of flesh. Retaliation is in order.

Wright, being a team leader, was willing to take the hit to end the issue. “If anybody is going to get hit, it’s me,” Wright said.

Collins didn’t want it to happen. “At this level, somebody is going to get hit,” Collins said. “And it wasn’t going to be David Wright tonight. I can’t control what’s going to happen down the road. He’s not going to get hurt in this game, in this situation, tonight.”

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Jan 18

What can $90 million get you?

First of all, I’d like to apologize for my spotty attendance lately. I’ve had several personal issues I’ve needed to attend to, and lately my health hasn’t been good. I was in the hospital yesterday and just haven’t felt up to it.

I have tried to maintain a consistent presence over the years, but have not been good so far in 2012. I apologize to you and promise to do better. I also appreciate your continued support.

Thank you.

This past few days have given me time to think, and, or course, attention drifts to the upcoming baseball season. Usually, this time of year has the optimism of spring training. With the Yankees making moves to improve their pitching, the Mets have done little.

The Mets’ projected payroll for 2012 is $90 million, which is a long separation to that of the Yankees, Phillies and most any other team expected to contend for the playoffs.

There have been examples of teams with small payrolls contending and even reaching the playoffs as Tampa Bay, Milwaukee and Minnesota proving over the years.

Winning can be done with limited financial resources, but a common denominator has been building with homegrown talent, having it develop and locking in the key pieces. Evan Longoria, Ryan Braun and Joe Mauer are prime examples. At one time, that’s what I thought the Mets were doing with David Wright and Jose Reyes.

Wright is entering the prime years of his career, but he is doing so with a string of nagging injuries the past few seasons and a lack of complementary support. The Mets aren’t in a hurry to trade him, but the fact they are contemplating it is all the proof you need to know where this franchise is headed.

Teams can compete – to a point – with a $90 million payroll, but doing so requires a strong foundation, and that’s also lacking. Ike Davis, Jon Niese, Ruben Tejada, Josh Thole, Lucas Duda and Daniel Murphy are young pieces, but I would be hesitant to label them a core for the future. We’ve only seen a smattering of promise from them, but also flaws and in some cases an injury history.

None possess the potential Wright and Reyes had when the Mets signed them to long-term contracts early in their career when the winning window was wide open.

Yes, 2006 seems like a long time ago.

If Niese and Davis, Duda and Tejada can play well, others stay healthy, and veterans such as Wright, Jason Bay and Mike Pelfrey play to their potential, the Mets could make some noise.

But, that’s a lot of things that have to break right for a franchise that’s been on a negative slide, and not going away is the potential $400 million hit from the Ponzi scandal.

I can’t say things won’t break for the Mets, but it is January, time for positive hoping if you’re a baseball fan.

Sep 29

Beautiful history … and Reyes.

It was stunning to see the Red Sox and Braves collapse over the past month, then finally crumble last night. We witnessed two of the great finishes in history, and the nature of it reminded us again of baseball’s magical power and hold on us.

It told us again a game and season are never over until the mathematics dictate it to be true. The winters will be long in Boston – which they are used to by now – and in Atlanta. Both teams seemed givens a month ago, only to turn around and give it away.

Maybe, there will be a new curse in Boston.

A pennant race is the best baseball has to offer, and heading into September there seemed no suspense, not much to make us curious. But, as it has for generations, the sport inexplicably grabbed us by the scruff of the neck and shook us awake.

It made us scramble in the morning to find the scores, to force us to take a peak at the television in bars and restaurants, to ask a stranger if he knew what happened. I was in a restaurant last night that was pro-Boston. It was raucous early in the evening, but a deathly Buckner-like quiet at closing time.

As ugly as it was in Boston and Atlanta, it was beautiful to see in St. Petersburg and St. Louis, and magical throughout the rest of the country. It was truly something historic and made us realize nothing should be taken for granted.

As I thought about the grand scale, I recalled  of how earlier in the day Jose Reyes took his place in baseball history for granted. He got his hit, a bunt hit, then decided to pack it in. He figured the odds were in his favor, Ryan Braun wouldn’t catch him and he’d have is own secure spot in history.

He figured right, but didn’t count on how he’d be remembered. For those of us who follow the Mets, he is the franchise’s first batting champion. But, he backed in. One of the great stories in baseball lore is how Ted Williams refused to sit on his average and insisted on playing both games of a doubleheader in 1941, went six-for-eight and finished at .406.

Williams’ .406 is one of baseball’s magical numbers and we’ll forever remember him. But, there’s nothing magical, or special, about Reyes or his .335. He’s somebody history will forget, and fittingly, take for granted.

The Mets finally have a batting champion, but he’s no champ.

Sep 28

Thanks Joe; Sorry Jose.

First, I’d like to thank Joe D. for his earlier posting this afternoon. Joe and I will be working more and more in the future, adding to each other’s blogs. I’m very happy to be affiliated with him and hope he feels the same.

REYES: Shortchanged everybody today.

We’re working on a lot of things and hope you enjoy them over the coming weeks as the offseason progresses.

The offseason’s biggest issue will be the decision to re-sign Jose Reyes.

The Mets won their season finale, but even should he hold on to win the batting title tonight over Ryan Braun, as far as I’m concerned he’s a loser in my book. To pull himself after one at-bat, and a bunt single no less, was bush.

Ted Williams did it the right way when he became the last player to hit over .400. Reyes was merely protecting a .335 average. Big deal. He should have done it the right way and played the whole game, if for no other reason, then reward the fans who have been cheering him all these years.

Sorry, I can’t feel good for Reyes and how he handled things. And, he certainly didn’t do anything to garner respect around the league and among his fans. His teammates didn’t say anything, then again, did you expect them, too?

Real weak, Jose. Real weak, Jose. I thought you were classier than that.

 

Apr 18

METS CHAT ROOM: Game #11; Santana goes.

CHAT ROOM

CHAT ROOM

We begin with the news Mike Pelfrey will miss his start tomorrow and Luis Castillo will bat second. That’s because Daniel Murphy will sit in favor of Gary Sheffield in left. Murphy was going to get a rest anyway, so this isn’t about rewarding Castillo for last night.

Johan Santana on the mound for the boys. It’s nice to have your ace going. I was thinking about that last night after Ryan Braun homered to give Milwaukee a brief lead. They lose this, and with Figueroa likely going Sunday, then Santana would be their only chance to win.