Apr 15

Is The Steroid Era Actually The Real Deadball Era?

alex rodriguez


On Friday afternoon, Michael Schmidt of the New York Times broke the story and identified Alex Rodriguez as the player who allegedly purchased documents from a former employee of Biogenesis of America in an attempt to destroy evidence linking him to the anti-aging clinic’s distribution of performance-enhancing drugs.

When the Miami New Times broke the story in January, I remember saying “this is the White Whale. This is the one that will blow the lid completely off the entire steroid and PED scandal.”

Since that day more than a dozen players have been implicated and tied to Biogensis including Rodriguez, Melky Cabrera, Gio GonzalezBartolo Colon, Nelson Cruz and Yasmani Grandal and 2012 MVP Ryan Braun.

While they all continue denying everything and scrambling for and convenient excuse they can find, the plot keeps thickening and the sordid details are piling up by the hundreds. Real details and real documents that even MLB themselves are trying to illegally buy at any price to get to the bottom of this and protect what little integrity the game has left.

The person charged with the role of Super Spy is none other than Bud Selig himself who who has been authorizing and signing off on huge sums of cash that is being used to secure whatever documents they can get their hands on from former employees of the lab who are now all seeking to cash to pay off their significant mounting legal fees.

And while Alex Rodriguez is no less guilty of doing the same thing, there is a huge difference.

MLB wants those documents so they can go after every player that is implicated and try to clean up the game.

A-Rod on the other hand, was seeking to get those documents and destroy them before the FBI or MLB got a hold of them.

But wait, there’s more…

Of course, Rodriguez flatly denied the accusation through a spokesman, but then he dropped another bombshell alleging that it was the New York Yankees that were paying for and buying those documents from the rogue former employee. Wow…

Oh and one more thing… Let’s stop calling them documents and lets start referring to them instead as illegally obtained evidence to hinder an ongoing federal, state and MLB investigation.

These are all allegations at this time, but when this is all over, I think more than a few people, including players, will be looking at life from a different perspective…

Prisoner Holding Cigarette Between Bars

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Mar 22

MLB And Selig Off Base In Latest Suit

There’s arrogance and there’s Major League Baseball arrogance, which is on another level.

Major League Baseball, as often has been the case when things don’t go its way, resorted to strong-arm tactics and finally the courts in its futile effort to get confidential documents from Biogenesis and its operator, Anthony Bosch. Major League Baseball filed suit today in South Florida to force Bosch to open his filing cabinet to commissioner Bud Selig and his legal storm troopers to have Biogenesis surrender documents it is not entitled to.

SELIG: Something not right, here.

SELIG: Something not right, here.

Selig wants Biogenesis to do his dirty, investigative work for him. Selig, infuriated that 90 baseball players are named on Bosch’s files, wants those documents so he can go after the players, namely Ryan Braun, whose lawyer outsmarted MLB’s hired gun when the Brewers’ MVP escaped a 50-game drug suspension on a technicality.

There is an appeals process jointly agreed to by MLB and the union and the sport lost. Now, move on.

Still, Selig clearly has it in for Braun and can’t let it go. Could be he’s going through his phone book now for Howie Spira’s number? Just who is advising this man?

Major League Baseball is threatening players and teammates – reportedly even offering immunity in some cases – for information on the 90.  Where is the Major League Baseball Players Association now in defending its constituency? Smacks of McCarthyism.

This should be thrown out on grounds of general principles. Seriously, doesn’t MLB think these things through?

Major League Baseball, as you know, has a dreadful, almost Mets-like record in the courts. It lost every time the union sued them for bargaining in bad faith, it lost in its collusion defense, it lost against Barry Bonds, it lost against Roger Clemens, and it will lose here.

Frankly, MLB couldn’t win if the other side had a signed confession.

Biogenesis was contracted to the players it individually serviced, not to their teams or MLB as an entity. Why do you think the players went there in the first place?

Biogenesis had no contract with MLB, and therefore violated nothing and didn’t wrong the sport other than bad publicity, of which it generates enough of its own in the first place.

Biogenesis has no legal obligation to oblige MLB in its request, and frankly, if it did, it would probably be vulnerable to lawsuits from the players for violating their privacy. Biogenesis might not be the most reputable organization in its field, but patients of it still should have reasonable expectations of privacy and not having their names surrendered in a witch-hunt.

Selig’s legacy is tainted at best. There’s no doubt he brought riches to the owners, in large part by ignoring the use of steroids in the late 1990’s and glorification of the sham that became the Mark McGwire-Sammy Sosa home run chase in an effort to spike attendance after the 1994 players strike.

Selig forced the strike by trying to push a salary cap on the union after MLB was stung on collusion charges. The union didn’t trust Selig, who drew pointed criticism from his predecessor, Fay Vincent.

“The Union basically doesn’t trust the Ownership because collusion was a $280 million theft by Bud Selig and Jerry Reinsdorf (Chicago White Sox owner) of that money from the players,’’ Vincent said. “I mean, they rigged the signing of free agents. They got caught. They paid $280 million to the players. And I think that’s polluted labor relations in baseball ever since it happened. I think it’s the reason (former union leader Donald) Fehr has no trust in Selig.’’

That strike, subsequent killing of the 1994 World Series and resultant steroids scandal will be how he’s remembered. He’s legitimately trying to clean up the sport, but this isn’t the right way. This further damages him.

Why doesn’t he learn?

Mar 22

No Conspiracy: The Mets Needed To Make Wright Captain

There is a conspiracy theory everywhere you look. I read one suggesting the Mets made David Wright captain to divert attention away from the field, where they are projected to be bad. Very bad.

C’mon. Are you serious? How long do you think that will last? With virtually no hope given to the Mets this year, they’ll be coming out to see Wright and the young players such as Matt Harvey, Ike Davis, Travis d’Arnaud and Zack Wheeler. The last two you’ll probably see sometime in June.

Smokescreens like that never work. Besides, Mets fans are like children and dogs in a way, after awhile, they know when they’re getting duped.

Besides, if taking the fan’s attention away from the team is the goal, they should have done this three years ago as the attendance at Citi Field has consistently dwindled.

Wright is simply the best player the Mets have, and arguably the best player – outside of Tom Seaver – they ever produced. And best, I mean both on and off the field.

As Major League Baseball goes after Ryan Braun and others in a witch hunt over PED’s, Wright has publicly stood up against drug users. A long time ago, when I asked Derek Jeter about steroids, he said: “I don’t use them, so it’s none of my business.”

Guess again. It is every player’s business for their sport to be clean and Wright, whether or not it comes from his father who is in law enforcement, has always stood for that goal. He should be commended for that alone.

I know some don’t feel Wright is clutch enough, but that’s nonsense. Baseball is about failing three out every ten at-bats just to be good, and Wright is the best the Mets have in that regard. Who else would you rather see at the plate in the ninth inning of a close game?

Jeff Wilpon said the appointment was for all Wright has done, and will do, for the organization in the future. The Mets have been awful on the field since 2008, and even worse off it with the Ponzi scandal, numerous bad signings and public relations fiascos. With all those around him losing their heads, Wright kept his, to paraphrase Rudyard Kipling.

When it was clear the Mets were about to sack Willie Randolph, Wright spoke out for his manager – and against management – because it was the right thing to do. He blamed himself and the players, not the manager whom management had spied on with Tony Bernazard.

A leader sometimes deals with uncomfortable things, and yes, Wright spoke against Lastings Milledge coming in late. He downplays it now, but it had to be done. Players often take their lead from other players, and when somebody doesn’t hustle, Wright lets him know it in a low-key, yet effective manner.

He doesn’t get in their faces, just their minds. And, that’s what leaders, and captains, do.

Mar 03

Delcos Sunday Column: Selig The Cause And Cure For Drug Problem

Major League Baseball already has the strictest doping policies among the four major professional sports, yet commissioner Bud Selig wants them even tighter.

Even prior to the expiration of the current CBA, Selig asked his VP of labor relations, Rob Manfred, and MLB Players Association chief Michael Weiner to hammer out a new agreement.

“I’ve always wanted (fans) to understand that I’ll always regard cleaning up this situation as something I’m very proud of,’’ Selig told reporters.

Selig wants his legacy to be that he’s the commissioner that got rid performance-enhancing drugs, which sound about right because it was under his watch that the problem mushroom into its current mess.

Continue reading

Feb 20

Mets Prospect Cesar Puello Linked To PEDs

This is a good way to get a career started. Mets outfield prospect Cesar Puello is linked to Anthony Bosch’s biogenesis clinic in South Florida, joining such luminaries as Alex Rodriguez, Ryan Braun, Melky Cabrera and former Met prospect Fernando Martinez.

In an e-mail statement, the Mets said: “Because of the ongoing investigation, we have no comment. We refer all questions to Major League Baseball.’’

Puello was injured for much of 2012 while playing for Single-A St. Lucie, and Martinez, you’ll recall, was frequently injured during his unsuccessful tenure with the Mets.

FRANCISCO TO THROW: Reliever Frank Francisco could begin throwing this weekend. He is down with elbow inflammation. If Francisco opens the season on the disabled list, which remains a distinct possibility, it could create a spot for submariner Greg Burke.

NOTEBOOK: Daniel Murphy received a cortisone injection yesterday in New York and is expected to be out seven to ten days. … If Pedro Felciano shows he has something left he could join Josh Edgin as a lefty in the bullpen. Terry Collins feels limited with only one lefty reliever. … The Mets have an intrasquad game Friday and start the exhibition schedule Saturday against Washington.

Sorry for the short post, I’ll have something else for you around noon. Have a great day.