Nov 20

Mets Should Pass On Desmond

Nobody can say what the Mets will do this winter, but this much is a certainty: Signing Ian Desmond in no way represents an upgrade by any stretch of the imagination. Desmond made $11 million last year for the Washington Nationals and will undoubtedly want more in the first of what will be a multi-year deal.

Only a fool would give in to Desmond’s demands.

DESMOND: Just say no. (Getty)

DESMOND: Just say no. (Getty)

The Mets seem determined to replace Wilmer Flores as their shortstop, and and there are reports they will not tender a contract to Ruben Tejada.

Desmond hit .233 last year with a .290 on-base percentage, and hit 19 homers with 62 RBI in 641 plate appearances. By comparison, Flores hit 16 homers with 59 RBI in 510 plate appearances. So, that means Desmond 131 more plate appearances to hit just three more homers with three more RBI.

And, he cost over $10 million for those three homers and three RBI. You can throw out any of the new wave statistics you want, but none of them translate in any way to making the Mets a better team.

Defensively, Desmond committed 27 errors in 670 chances, while Flores made 14 errors in 400 chances at shortstop and didn’t make an error in 153 chances at second base.

i don’t see how those numbers in any way determine an upgrade at shortstop.

Like I said, I don’t know what the Mets will do this winter, but I can without a doubt what they shouldn’t do, and that’s go after Desmond.

Nov 06

Mets Make Qualifying Offer To Murphy

The Mets’ first order of postseason business was extending manager Terry Collins for two years, and their second step was to make Daniel Murphy to a one-year, $15.8-million qualifying offer. He has a week to respond.

As with Collins, the Murphy deal was a no-brainer for the following reasons:

MURPHY:  Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

MURPHY: Mets expected to make offer. (Getty)

1) If Murphy rejects the offer the Mets would receive a compensatory draft pick from the team that signs him.

2) The Mets are currently reluctant to give Murphy the reported figure of $50 million over four years. Before going long-term with Murphy, the Mets must first figure out if his post-season power run was an aberration or a sign of things to come.

3) That question could possibly be answered this year. Keeping Murphy around for another year could also enable them to figure out David Wright’s physical status and bide time for Ruben Tejada to heal.

If those two health issues are realized, Murphy would be a capable insurance policy.

If Murphy’s power surge is not a fluke the Mets will probably have to cough up more than if they signed him to a multi-year deal now, but that’s a gamble they would have to take.

Should the Mets be willing to go long-term on Murphy, he could give them a home-team discount.

“I like it here, and I’d like to come back,’’ Murphy said after the World Series. “I feel blessed to have been a Met this long.’’

Murphy was a 13th-round round pick of the Mets in 2006.

Among the teams that might have interest in Murphy are both Los Angeles teams, San Francisco and the Yankees.

NOTEBOOK:  The team said center fielder Juan Lagares will not require surgery on his right elbow. Lagares had a breakout season in 2014 and was rewarded with a multi-year contract, but regressed this season and had difficulty throwing. … Outfielder Michael Cuddyer underwent surgery to repair a core muscle injury. He will make $12.5 million in 2016. … LH reliever Josh Smoker was added to the 40-man roster. … A published report from Washington said the Mets could be interested in outfielder Denard Span, who was not given a qualifying offer by the Nationals.

Oct 31

Mets Now The Hammer?

The Mets’ appreciation of hard knocks depends on whether they are the hammer or the nail on any given day.

Not surprisingly, they didn’t like Chase Utley’s hard slide into Ruben Tejada in Game 2 of the NLDS. Of course, they overwhelmingly endorsed Noah Syndergaard buzzing Alcides Escobar’s head on the first pitch of Game 1.

SYNDERGAARD: Turns tone of Series to Mets. (Getty)

SYNDERGAARD: Turns tone of Series to Mets. (Getty)

Syndergaard didn’t back off his intentions after the game, and in fact, boasted about them.

“If they have a problem with me throwing inside, they can meet me 60 feet, 6 inches away,’’ which was not the brightest of things for Syndergaard to say later.

The Royals haven’t stopped chirping about that pitch, and neither have the Mets.

“He went out there and did his job, and we’re all proud of him for that,’’ said Game 5 starter Matt Harvey. “His comments are, I think for us, kind of taken with a grain of salt. But we’re obviously happy about what he did.’’

There was a lot of speculation about payback before the game, but that was never going to happen.

It’s the World Series and nobody wants to tossed.

And, it’s the World Series an no team likes to have the momentum turn against them, but that’s the case here. The games have been close, but the Royals aren’t the same team they were in Kansas City. And, neither are the Mets. They are now the hammer.

Oct 12

Mets NLDS Game Thread

Well, here are, just where we always wanted to be, only we didn’t think there would be so much peripheral tension attached to the Game 3. It’s an electric atmosphere at Citi Field tonight where Matt Harvey tries to put the Mets in the driver’s seat in their NLDS Series against the Dodgers.

In the other dugout, there’s every Mets’ fan favorite villain, Chase Utley, whose violent takeout slide of Ruben Tejada ended his season and put a target on his back like never before.

Harvey has been told not to retaliate with the beanball, and that the best revenge is winning.

It should be a terrific game and I’m hopeful we’ll have great conversation. Thanks.


Oct 12

Harvey Must Keep Head About Him While Others Are Losing Theirs

We all know Matt Harvey has a mind of his own, but his mind tonight had better be in sync with Mets manager Terry Collins.

Harvey made veiled threats at retaliation towards Dodgers second baseman Chase Utley for his take out slide that broke Ruben Tejada‘s right leg Saturday night in Los Angeles. Collins wants no part of it.

HARVEY: Must focus on the big prize. (AP)

HARVEY: Must focus on the big prize. (AP)

“Play baseball,” was Collins’ message to Harvey. “Play the game. This is too big a game. We need to not worry about retaliating. We need to worry about winning. The one thing you don’t need to do is get yourself in a situation to put yourself on the bad side. I understand everything that happened.”

That message should apply to all the Mets. No beanballs, no vicious slides.

“As frustrated as we are, as upset as we are, we feel so bad for Ruben, but you know, the one thing we can’t do is cost ourselves a game, and this particular game, because we’re angry,” Collins said. “We can play angry, but we gotta play under control.”

Tonight’s objective is to beat the Dodgers, plain and simple. There should be nothing else on Harvey’s agenda, but considering the innings fiasco, plus being late for last week’s workout, there’s been negative press directed at Harvey.

Until then, Harvey has always been given the benefit of doubt by the New York media and fans primarily because he has been vocal about pitching in the playoffs for the Mets. That all sounds good, but the bottom line is Harvey needs to produce in that scenario.

He gets his chance tonight, and if he’s smart, he needs to heed Collins’ words and just concern himself with the baseball and not the vigilante business.