Feb 22

Mets Should Dig Into Their History For Instructors

I was thrilled to hear today the Mets invited Mike Piazza to spring training to be a guest instructor. I only hope being inducted into the Hall of Fame isn’t the only reason for the gesture. Frankly, it is something they should be doing every spring – and not just with Piazza.

PIAZZA: To visit spring training.

PIAZZA: To visit spring training.

When I covered the Yankees, their spring training resembled an Old Timers Day with Yogi Berra, Don Mattingly, Rich Gossage, Whitey Ford, Graig Nettles and Reggie Jackson. It should be the same way with the Mets.

There’s nobody better than Tom Seaver to discuss pitching with this rotation. If not him then Jerry Koosman or Jon Matlack. And, hasn’t all been forgiven with Dwight Gooden and Darryl Strawberry?

Jerry Grote, Bud Harrelson, Mookie Wilson, Ed Kranepool, Ray Knight, Ron Hunt and Ron Swoboda are all historic Mets with something to bring to the table. Of course, I’d like to see Keith Hernandez and Ron Darling be more active.

Not only can they impart their baseball knowledge, but also what it was like to play for the Mets in a different era. It’s organizational pride and it shouldn’t be forgotten.

Jul 14

DeGrom Provides Mets All-Star Memory

Jacob deGrom didn’t pitch long, but long enough to show why teams would salivate for the chance to get him if the Mets were to put him on the market.

DEGROM: Gives us a memory. (AP)

DEGROM: Gives us a memory. (AP)

The 2014 NL Rookie of the Year struck out the side in the fifth inning, and needed only ten pitches to do it.

Overpowering is too tame a word. He was nasty. He was filthy. He was special. He was so good that Madison Bumgarner, who is pretty special himself, waited on him when he returned to the dugout with a drink of water.

“He’s a nice guy,’’ the typically understated deGrom said of Bumgarner during a between-innings interview.

DeGrom also said, “I remember being nervous running out there, but not much else.’’

Even so, he gave Mets’ fans a memory that will rank among the franchise’s best in All-Star history as he joined Dwight Gooden as the only Amazin’ to strike out the side (in 1984).

The others on that list are:

2013: Matt Harvey throwing two scoreless innings at Citi Field.

2012: R.A. Dickey tossing a scoreless inning.

2010: David Wright getting two hits and a stolen base.

2006: David Wright homering.

1979: Lee Mazzilli hitting a pinch-hit homer in the eighth to tie the game and drawing a bases-loaded walk in the ninth to drive in the game winner.

1968: Jerry Koosman striking out Carl Yastrzemski to end game.

1967: Tom Seaver earning the save in a 15-inning game.

1964: Ron Hunt became the first Met selected and collected a single in his first at-bat in the game played at Shea Stadium.

 

Jul 12

Today in Mets’ History: Mets in the All-Star Game.

On this date in 1966, in the stifling 100-degree temperature at St. Louis’ Busch Stadium, the National League prevailed, 2-1, in ten innings.

Tim McCarver led off the inning against Pete Richert with a single to right and was sacrificed to second by Ron Hunt. Maury Wills then singled home the game-winning run.

In the 1988 game at Cincinnati’s Riverfront Stadium, David Cone pitched a 1-2-3 inning and Gary Carter and Darryl Strawberry had hits in the National League’s 2-1 loss.

Dwight Gooden started for the National League that day and gave up a run in three innings and took the loss.

Jul 07

Today in Mets’ History: Hunt an All-Star.

HUNT: His card has to be worth more than two bucks.

The Mets will soon host the All-Star Game at Citi Field. However, on this date in 1964, Shea Stadium was home to its only All-Star Game, won 7-4 by the National League.

Second baseman Ron Hunt was the first Met to start an All-Star Game and went 1-for-3 with a single off the Angels’ Dean Chance.

Hunt played with the Mets from 1963-66, then went on to play with the Dodgers (1967), Giants (1968-70), Expos (1971-74) and Cardinals (also in 1974).

Hunt’s baseball legacy was summed up by this quote from him: “Some people give their bodies to science; I give mine to baseball.’’

He had a knack for being hit by pitches, and was plunked 243 times in his career (he had 1,429 career base hits). Incredibly, he was hit 50 times in 1971 while with the Giants. He led the league in that category for seven straight seasons.

HUNT’s CAREER