Jun 17

Wright Injury, Lack Of Offense, Could Force Mets To Deal Harvey

I don’t know if we’ll see David Wright will play again for the Mets. I would hope so, but one never knows.

However, what we can be reasonably sure of is we’ll likely never see the Wright who hit at least 26 homers and drove in 100 runs five times in a six-year stretch.

HARVEY: What could he bring in return? (AP)

HARVEY: What could he bring in return? (AP)

The Mets haven’t been hitting for the better part of the last six weeks. Wright and Lucas Duda are on the disabled list. Michael Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes are starting to show breakout signs after being in lengthy slumps.

Don’t forget both Cespedes and Neil Walker can leave after this season. And, we don’t know if the Mets will need to replace Wright, but they will need to add offense. Let’s not limit the offense to power, but the ability to hit with RISP.

Catcher, first base, second base, third base and an outfielder will be on GM Sandy Alderson’s shopping list this winter, and not all of those voids will be filled by free agency.

Given that, it might be time explore dealing one of their young arms. They dealt Zack Wheeler along with Wilmer Flores for Carlos Gomez, but that fell apart.

Once again, this leads to speculation they might be willing to part with Friday’s starter, Matt Harvey, who was so-so against Atlanta after three consecutive strong starts.

Harvey, who worked six innings against the Braves, will be a free agent after the 2018 season. He’s making over $4.3 million this year and is arbitration eligible after the next two seasons, so he has a reasonable contract.

With Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz in the rotation, Wheeler on the disabled list, and the recently drafting pitchers Justin Dunn of Boston College and Anthony Kay of UConn, the Mets seem in good shape with their starting pitching.

And, with the belief his agent, Scott Boras, won’t seek to negotiate early and won’t leave money on the table – the recent deal signed by Steven Strasburg notwithstanding – this might be the time to deal Harvey in need of offense.

That Harvey has pitched well in three of his last four starts _ he gave up four runs in six inning Friday – and has shown he’s healthy after undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2013 enhances his value.

Depending how the remainder of the season shakes out, dealing Harvey might be something to explore. Seriously.

 

Jun 12

Things Better Change Quickly For Mets

Last week I asked if there was a reason to be concerned with the Mets, but stopped short of saying they were in trouble. I’m not stopping short any longer. If the season ended today the Mets would make the playoffs as the second wild card, but there are more than a few reasons to believe they aren’t heading in the right direction.

MATZ: Roughed up Sunday. (Getty)

MATZ: Roughed up Sunday. (Getty)

There’s plenty of season left to turn things around, but also enough time has gone by to conclude despite their young pitching – and Bartolo Colon – that if there’s not a reversal soon the playoffs many of us took for granted on Opening Day might not happen.

Following their 15-7 April, including Sunday’s 5-3 loss in Milwaukee the Mets have gone 19-21. They are 4.5 games behind Washington, and one of seven teams lumped under the 4.5-game umbrella of wild-contenders.

Teams will lose, but the Mets didn’t play well during their 5-5 road trip. They weren’t just beaten, they beat themselves. On Sunday, they had breakdowns in all phases: 1) Steven Matz was roughed up in his second straight start; 2) the defense committed three errors and could have had a fourth; and 3) and their hitters struck out ten times and went 2-for-9 with RISP.

April’s storyline was the Mets’ propensity for hitting homers, but more importantly in their 62 games they have scored three or fewer runs in half (31) of them. That’s an alarming number. Overall, they are hitting .214 with RISP; and average around nine strikeouts and close to the same in runners left on base in a game.

Nine strikeouts mean in three innings they did not put the ball in play. For all those who don’t give credence to strikeouts as an important statistic, it is time to get a clue. Not putting the ball in play means no chance for hits; no chance to reach on an error; no sacrifice flies; and no productive outs to put runners in scoring position.

A positive note is Matt Harvey seems to have turned it around, but could that be offset by Matz’s two straight stinkers? And, Jacob deGrom hasn’t won in his last seven starts. The bullpen, so positive in April, is showing cracks. Closer Jeurys Familia is far from a sure thing. Their most reliable reliever is Addison Reed; with everybody else you hold your breath.

Injuries are a concern with David Wright, Lucas Duda and Travis d’Arnaud on the disabled list. They could get d’Arnaud back in a week or so, but he wasn’t hitting or throwing runners out on the bases before he got hurt. Michael Conforto has a sore wrist and is in a dreadful slump; Neil Walker has a tight lower back; and Juan Lagares has an injured left thumb.

The upcoming schedule is brutal as from now until the All-Star break they have three more games with Pittsburgh; two against Kanas City; three with the Marlins; four against the Cubs and seven with the Nationals. Beginning Tuesday, the Mets start a stretch of 26 games in 27 days.

Seriously, there’s a chance the trade deadline could be moot.

The Mets can get on a hot streak, turn things around and maybe add a couple of pieces just as they did last season. However, since the end of April we’ve seen precious few signs of that happening.

There’s reason for concern, and yes, they are in trouble.

Jun 11

June 11, Mets’ Lineup At Milwaukee

The Mets will try to make it four straight this afternoon in Milwaukee behind Logan Verrett. The Mets were beyond fortunate to win last night, 2-1 in 11 innings, mostly because the Brewers had a mind cramp in the field.
Matt Harvey had his third straight strong start and Yoenis Cespedes homered to overcome the Mets’ horrendous situational hitting, going 1-for-12 with RISP and stranding 11.
Here’s the order:
Curtis Granderson – RF: Has 11 homers but only 18 RBI. If that doesn’t tell you what you need to know about his production, then try this one: 3-for-35 (.086) with RISP.
Michael Conforto – LF: He was supposed to be the No. 3 hitter, but is now batting second. Of his 29 RBI, 13 have either tied the game or given the Mets the lead.
Cespedes – CF: His slump is over as he’s 7-for-15 in his last three games. Hit his 16th homer Friday.
Neil Walker – 2B: Has 13 homers with 25 RBI and batting .297 with RISP. Makes you think he’ll be walking this winter.
James Loney – 1B: Filled the void left by Lucas Duda‘s injury. Has hit better (.286 RISP) than people expected.
Asdrubal Cabrera – SS: Was the No. 2 when David Wright went down, but that seems by the boards, too. Lifetime .300 hitter vs. Brewers.
Wilmer Flores – 3B: Is batting .500 (13-26) since taking over at third base. Has seven hits in the last three games.
Rene Rivera – C: Was reported to be Harvey’s catcher, but didn’t play Friday. Turns out it didn’t matter. Mets are 9-5 when he starts.
Verrett – RHP: Took a loss, May 14 at Colorado, in his last start. It’s like he’s pitching against the Mets when there’s RISP.  Hitters batting .167 with RISP against him.
Jun 01

Mets Wrap: Mets’ Lousy Hitting Wastes Another DeGrom Start

DeGROM: Great start wasted. (Getty)

DeGROM: Great start wasted. (Getty)

The Mets’ inability to hit with runners in scoring position, and manager Terry Collins’ insistence they are a home run-hitting team is beyond aggravating. It has gotten tiresome. Unless there’s a reversal in this trend, forget about reaching the World Series, much less getting there.

I don’t know how many times Collins said this year the Mets “don’t play small ball,” that “this team is built on power.”

Collins was at it again after Wednesday’ 2-1 loss in 13 innings to the Chicago White Sox, telling reporters: “We’re not a small ball team. We don’t steal bases. We don’t hit-and-run. To ask them to do something to do that they aren’t used to doing you’re asking them to fail.”

That’s blue-and-orange colored crap. Collins said the Mets work on their situational hitting all the time in batting practice.

“Every team talks about situational hitting,” Collins said. “Now it has to be applied.”

Now it has to be applied? It should have been applied since spring training.

Collins said it should be noted the team is without David Wright, Lucas Duda and Travis d’Arnaud, all now injured, and Yoenis Cespedes, who asked for the game off.

While that’s fair to note, it should also be remembered Wright is hitting .226 with 14 RBI; Duda .231 with 19 RBI; and d’Arnaud .196 with one RBI. The three have a combined 94 strikeouts. Cespedes appeared as a pinch hitter and struck out for the 45th time.

The power-laden Mets lost two games each to the Dodgers and White Sox. They scored only six runs during the Chicago series.

The Mets’ situational hitting wasted a superb outing by Jacob deGrom, who is winless in his last six starts, including a loss and five straight no-decisions. Three of those no-decisions turned into a one-run loss by the Mets.

Today they had 20 runners, but only one scored. They went 1-for-8 with RISP and stranded 14 runners. Also horrible were 12 strikeouts and scoring just one run after getting 13 walks.

Today was a microcosm of how off-base Collins’ reasoning is, and if correct, how poorly this team has been constructed by GM Sandy Alderson.

Yes, the Mets’ 73 home runs are great, but they are an aberration. Everything has to be perfect to hit a home run. The stride, the swing, making contact at the precise split second all have to come together. It might be the most perfect moment in sports.

But, you can’t live off swinging for perfection. History is full of powerful teams that didn’t win a World Series. Take a walk and advance the runner; bunt; steal; hit-and-run; get the clutch hit; and don’t strike out.

A more important and telling stat is in half their 52 games the Mets scored three runs or less.

METS GAME WRAP

June 1, 2016, @ Citi Field

Game: #52          Score:  White Sox 2, Mets 1 (13)

Record: 29-23     Streak: L 2

Standings: Second, NL East, 2.5 games behind Washington prior to the Nationals’ game Wednesday night.  Playoffs: Second, half-game WC behind Pittsburgh.

Runs: 195    Average:  3.75   Times 3 or less: 26

SUMMARY:  It just goes to show you can never tell what might happen in a major league game. Relief pitcher Matt Albers doubled off Logan Verrett to lead off the 13th inning – his first hit in nine years – took third on a wild pitch and scored on a sacrifice fly.

KEY MOMENT:  The Mets left the bases loaded in the sixth. Hell, they Mets left a lot of men on base all day. … Albers double was pretty big, also.

THUMBS UP:  DeGrom was superb and deserved better. He struck out ten. … Two hits by Rivera. … One run in six innings from the bullpen. … Two walks each by Asdrubal Cabrera, Neil Walker and Juan Lagares.

THUMBS DOWN:  Hansel Robles left the game with one out in the 11th inning with an injury. Jerry Blevins came out but Collins wanted Verrett instead. … The Mets grounded into five double plays. … Michael Conforto struck out four times while going 0-for-6. That includes grounding into a double play. He could use the off day. … DeGrom’s bad pitch to Todd Frazier resulting in a home run.

EXTRA INNINGS:  Wright will get more treatment and One join the team in Miami. …

QUOTEBOOK: “He really battles. When you’re living on the edge, it takes a lot out of you.’’ – Collins on deGrom.

BY THE NUMBERS:  .208: Mets batting average with RISP in the last ten games.

NEXT FOR METS: They are off Thursday, then start a three-game series in Miami against the Marlins, with Noah Syndergaard starting.

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May 15

Mets Wrap: Don’t Blame Umps For Last Two Losses

LAGARES: Out of the baseline. Maybe. (AP)

LAGARES: Out of the baseline. Maybe. (AP)

Controversial calls factored in the Mets’ losses today and Saturday, but to be clear, they did not decide the outcome either game.

I’m not sure Juan Lagares ran out of the baseline today, but I am positive Tony Wolters did not foul tip that pitch Saturday. I’m also positive I don’t care for manager Terry Collins’ explanation both times.

“Look [second base umpire Rob Drake] made the call,’’ Collins meekly told reporters. “Doesn’t matter what it’s going to do, you don’t challenge it. So it’s over, let’s go, move on.’’

All fire Saturday, that answer portrayed Collins as defeated today. The Mets seemed defeated mentally after Collins left the field.

All right, the play is not reviewable, but Collins never said he asked the umpire – on either night – to ask for help. If he did, he should have made a big stink about the arrogance of umpires who refuse to ask for a second opinion.

There’s no crying in baseball, as so goes the cliché from the movie. That should include the SNY analysts. The Mets didn’t lose either game because of bad calls, they lost because they didn’t play well, either night.

Rockies pitchers threw 126 pitches Sunday, which means the Mets had 126 potential opportunities to make plays. They also were 2-for-6 with RISP with six runners left on base.

Those numbers were 145 pitches on Saturday, going 3-for-11 with RISP and eight stranded.

Collins likes to say the Mets are a “team built on power.’’ If that is the case, and it appears to be, then they are constructed poorly.

Everybody loves homers, but the Mets’ numbers hitting with RISP and leaving runners on base aren’t good. As a team, they are hitting .212 with RISP, and leave an average of seven runners on base and strike out nine times a game.

Your pitching has to be pretty good to overcome that, and frankly, it hasn’t been.

Jacob deGrom pitched well enough to win most games, but said he missed on several pitches, notably on Carlos Gonzalez’s homer in the sixth.

Reliever Jim Henderson, who has been spotless for much of the season, gave up a two-run homer in the seventh.

Those two pitches hurt the Mets more than the Lagares call, and even with those pitches, they had their chances.

The bottom line is winning teams take advantage of opportunities and the Mets aren’t playing well right now.

“It was a long trip, a terrible finish to it,’’ Collins said. “We’ll pick up the pieces. We’ve got a long, long, long way to go.’’

METS GAME WRAP

May 15, 2016

Game: #37           Score: Rockies 4, Mets 3

Record: 21-16     Streak: L 4

Standings: Third, NL East 1.5 GB Nationals; half-game behind Phillies  Playoffs Today: Second WC vs. Philadelphia

Runs: 146     Average: 3.9    Times 3 or less: 16

SUMMARY:  DeGrom wasn’t great, but pitched well enough to win most games, which he might have done had he gotten support from his offense and bullpen.

KEY MOMENT:  Ryan Raburn’s two-run, pinch-hit homer off Henderson in the seventh. Perhaps, Collins pulling deGrom after just 102 pitches moments before might be that moment. Your choice.

THUMBS UP:  DeGrom gave the Mets a chance to win. … Yoenis Cespedes homered in the second. … Washington and Philadelphia also lost.

THUMBS DOWN:  Alejandro De Aza and Asdrubal Cabrera went a combined 1-for-8 with no walks and four strikeouts at the top of the order. … Henderson’s pitch to Raburn.

EXTRA INNINGS:  Collins said Steven Matz will throw Monday and could still pitch during the Washington series. … David Wright appeared as a pinch-hitter and made the last out of the game.

QUOTEBOOK:  “I’m still not feeling very comfortable on the mound,’’ – DeGrom on his pitching.

BY THE NUMBERS:  32: Runs scored by the Mets during the 11-game trip.

NEXT FOR METS:  Noah Syndergaard (3-2, 2.53 ERA) starts against Washington on Tuesday night. He is 1-0 with a 1.80 ERA in three career starts against the Nationals.

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