Aug 12

Today in Mets’ History: Mays’ finale at Candlestick.

When the consider the event, it was shocking that only 13,000 were in attendance on this day in 1973 at San Francisco.

MAYS: Always popular at Shea.

The Giants beat the Mets, 4-1, in what was Willie Mays’ last appearance as a player in Candlestick Park. Mays went 0-for-4.

Five days later, against Cincinnati’s Don Gullet at Shea Stadium, Mays hit his 660th and final home run of his career.

This was Mays’ last season, and it was a disappointing way to go out, even if he played in the World Series. In 66 games, Mays hit .211 with six homers and 25 RBI.

The Mets traded for Mays in May of 1972 in a public relations coup for the franchise. At the time, the Giants were in financial distress and owner Horace Stoneham couldn’t guarantee a position after retirement.

MAYS CAREER

 

Aug 11

Today in Mets’ History: Carter hits 300th homer

On this day in 1988, Gary Carter hit his 300th career home run in a 9-6 victory at Chicago.

Carter finished that season with 11 homers and just 46 RBI, and was released after the 1989 season.

In five seasons with the Mets, Carter hit 89 homers with 349 RBI.

After leaving the Mets, Carter played single seasons for San Francisco, Los Angeles and retired as an Expo in 1992.

NOTE: Carter’s daughter, Kimmy Bloemers reports his brain tumors have improved, but the condition remains inoperable.

 

Aug 08

Today in Mets’ History: Remember George Foster.

On this day in 1985, George Foster had a big day for the Mets with three RBI in a 14-7 victory at Montreal. It was one of his few, if not his last.

FOSTER: Bust in Shea.

Even with his performance, Foster was overshadowed as Keith Hernandez, Gary Carter and Wally Backman also drove in three runs apiece.

After several monster years with Cincinnati, including hitting 52 and 40 homers in consecutive seasons, the Mets landed the slugger for Greg Harris, Jim Kern and Alex Trevino.

Finally, a true power machine was on his way to Shea

Foster, who already seemed on the downside of his career, was given a five-year, $10-million contract (worth over $22 million by today’s standards).

Foster hit 13 homers in 1982, his first year with the Mets, but bounced back the following year to hit 28, but it was merely a glimpse of his former self as he never hit that many again.

In parts of five seasons with the Mets, Foster hit 99 homers with 361 RBI and will always be regarded as one of the most disappointing acquisitions in club history.

Maybe Foster felt more at home in laid back Cincinnati with its roster of stars in Pete Rose, Johnny Bench and Tony Perez. Perhaps the expectations were too high in New York in the early years, but in the end Foster was also surrounded by stars so the spotlight wasn’t only on him.

Old accounts of him said he was moody, surly and didn’t hustle. In the end, Foster played the race card when talking about his diminished playing time.

“I don’t want to say it’s a racial thing, but … ’’

He was waived shortly after that and signed with the Chicago White Sox. Funny thing, it was Kevin Mitchell who replaced Foster in left field.

At the time the Mets dumped Foster in 1986, he had one homer and 13 RBI.

At one time the guy could play, but he’ll always be remembered as one of the most disliked Mets joining a group that includes Oliver Perez, Luis Castillo, Bobby Bonilla, Vince Coleman, Bret Saberthagen, Kaz Matsui and Scott Schoeneweis.

If you can think of others on the list, let us know.

BOX SCORE

FOSTER CAREER

 

Aug 01

Today in Mets’ History: Cycling with McReynolds.

For some reason, perhaps because he was quiet and never appeared to break a sweat. Perhaps it was his unemotional demeanor, but Mets fans never warmed up to Kevin McReynolds.

McREYNOLDS: Quiet talent.

However, on this date in 1989, McReynolds hit for the cycle and drove in six runs in an 11-0 rout of St. Louis.

McReynolds’ best season with the Mets was in 1988 when he hit .288 with career highs in RBI (99), stolen bases (21 without being caught), and hit 27 homers.

Originally signed by San Diego, McReynolds was traded to the Mets in a deal that sent Kevin Mitchell to the Padres. The Mets traded McReynolds to Kansas City in 1991 in a multi-year deal that brought Bret Saberhagen to the Mets. In 1994, the Royals traded McReynolds back to the Mets for Vince Coleman.

So, you can see McReynolds was a magnet for players carrying “questionable’’ baggage.

McREYNOLDS CAREER

McREYNOLDS BOX SCORE

 

Jul 21

Today in Mets’ History: A tip of the hat to Beltran.

Thanks to Ray Sadecki for noting today might be Carlos Beltran’s last home game as a member of the Mets. Will they trade him before the trade deadline or extend this out until August? All indications are the Mets will move before July 31.

Ray asked for some reflections on the Beltran Era, and what sticks out most for me is him playing with a broken face after his outfield collision with Mike Cameron. Most outfielders would have packed it in, but Beltran kept on playing while others weren’t. Beltran played hurt, and he played hurt often. He is a gamer.

In 2006, he carried the Mets like the All-Star he was. I’ll never begrudge him for Adam Wainwright because it was a nasty pitch and who wouldn’t get caught on that?

From 2006-08, Beltran hit at least 27 homers with 112 RBI, but injuries sapped his production those two seasons. I’ll remember how the Mets rushed him back for a few more at-bats rather than undergo surgery immediately. It got to the point where Beltran had surgery on his own, causing him to be late for the 2010 season. That was on Omar Minaya.

I’ll always regard Beltran as a player capable of carrying a team on his back for a week or two, but not to the point where he’d shape a game like Mark McGwire or Barry Bonds. Then again, I’ll always remember Beltran as a clean player, one who was good to the game.

It’s a shame the Mets’ financial problems forced this position. If this had been handled better during the surgery issue and the Mets’ not caught with their pants down in the Ponzi scandal, then perhaps we’d be talking about an extension for him.

Beltran had a good career here when healthy. His career is over with the Mets, but there will an extension for him somewhere.