Feb 18

Mets’ Zack Wheeler Likes Low Profile

One of the highlights for the New York Mets last season was a double-header sweep of Atlanta anchored by future aces Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler.

If you weren’t reading about Harvey last summer you were reading about Wheeler. This spring most of the ink is going to Noah Syndergaard, whom the Mets expect will be in the major leagues in June.

WHEELER: That night in Atlanta.

WHEELER: That night in Atlanta.

“That’s fine with me,’’ Wheeler told reporters Tuesday in Port St. Lucie when asked about the spotlight being on Syndergaard. “I don’t have to have all the attention.’’

Actually, in Wheeler’s perfect world, he would rather have little, if any. Wheeler is extremely quiet and shy, and if given the choice, he’d rather not talk if he didn’t have to.

Wheeler was 7-5 with a 3.42 ERA last season in 17 starts. Manager Terry Collins doesn’t presently see an innings limit on Wheeler, and believes his composure and natural stuff will enable him to progress.

Collins said at the Winter Meetings Harvey showed he could make adjustments on the run and thinks Wheeler has that same capability.

Wheeler was matter-of-fact when asked today what he needs to do to improve: “Just being more consistent, throwing more strikes and stuff.’’

Ask any veteran pitcher and he’d say the same thing. That’s one of the things the Mets like about Wheeler.

 

Feb 17

Mets’ Matt Harvey Doesn’t Regret Surgery Option

Matt Harvey doesn’t give in easily, but finally admitted he won’t be a part of the 2014 New York Mets as anything but a footnote.

Harvey, who recently said he wanted to pitch this season if his rehab from Tommy John surgery is complete by September, caved in Sunday and acknowledged it to be a long shot. Perhaps that his locker isn’t on `Starters Row,’ but close to the training room might have been the deciding factor.

HARVEY: Won't be an easy spring.

HARVEY: Won’t be an easy spring.

“It’s a little bit difficult of a day considering I’m starting to realize that the year is not going to go the way I wanted it to,’’ Harvey told reporters in Port St. Lucie Sunday. “But, you’ve got to do what you’ve got to do, and the rehab is going to continue. I’m not sure when I’m going to start throwing, but hopefully in the near future.

“It’s hard seeing all the guys, seeing them put their uniforms on, and realizing that spring training is going to go a little differently this year.’’

It had to be tough emotionally for him considering the high he rode last season until injuring his elbow. He had New York in the palm of his hand, but couldn’t ignore the nagging pain in his forearm and elbow.

Initially, Harvey wanted to choose rest over surgery, but finally relented. He said he’s finally at peace with the decision.

“I needed that time to make the decision and make sure that it was the right one and the one that I wanted to go with,’’ Harvey said. “I’m happy that I did things on my own time. Mentally moving forward I think that was a big thing for me to do.’’

As of now, Harvey will miss 2014. Had he opted for rest he might have been ready, but if he later blew out his elbow he would have missed the remainder of 2014 plus 2015. Considering those options, Harvey opted to miss the least amount of time as possible.

Mets physicians will soon meet with Dr. James Andrews, who performed the surgery, to map out a timetable for his rehab this season and this throwing program.

“Whenever they decide I can throw, that’s their decision. I can only make sure I’m strong and flexible,’’ Harvey said. “It’s definitely tough, but I’ve come to the realization that I have to listen to them and I can’t push too much.’’

That rushing sound you hear is a sigh of relief from Mets’ management.

Harvey is a competitor with no quit. Maybe he needed this experience to understand the fragility of his career and better take care of his arm.

ON DECK: Jenrry Mejia on bullpen shuttle again?

Feb 17

A Look At A Spring Training Day; On Tap For Today

The New York Mets are holding their first workouts of spring training today and could be coming off the field shortly. After all, with just pitchers and catchers, there’s not much you can do.

The pitchers are divided into two groups, with one throwing today and another tomorrow. There could be a few pitching fielding drills, but not much else, certainly not throwing to hitters.

The position players in camp will be throwing outside, but full-scale fielding drills won’t take place until later in the week. The Mets have enclosed batting cages and are hitting off tees and pitching machines. There could be batting practice from coaches, but not off any of the other pitchers.

While most position players on the major league level are already in camp, they don’t have to be in Port St. Lucie until Feb. 20, with physicals the following day.

The first full-squad workouts won’t take place until next weekend and the exhibition schedule starts Feb. 28. Until then, the days begin early with meetings, fielding drills – including pitchers – base running drills, and plenty of batting practice.

The days break up in the early afternoon, with the players spending time on the golf course or with their families.

A spring training camp is highly organized, with every player knowing where he’s supposed to be at any of the Mets’ over half-dozen fields.

Today I’ll have the following:

* Mets Chief Operating Officer Jeff Wilpon from a MLB.com report on several of the club’s key financial issues.

* Matt Harvey finally acknowledging he won’t pitch this year.

* Curtis Granderson on what he brings to the Mets.

* A wrap of today’s events.

 

Feb 13

Howie Rose And Josh Lewin To Return; Spring Training Radio Games

In what hardly constitutes a surprise, the New York Mets officially announced the return of broadcasters Howie Rose and Josh Lewin as play-by-play announcers on new flagship station, WOR 710-AM.

The following spring training games will be broadcast:

Date                            Team                                      Location                     Time

Fri. Feb. 28                 Washington Nationals            Port St. Lucie                1:10 p.m.

Sun. March 2              St. Louis Cardinals                Jupiter                           1:05 p.m.

Mon., March 3            Atlanta Braves                       Disney                          1:05 p.m.

Wed., March 5            Washington Nationals (SS)   Viera                             1:05 p.m.

Sun., March 9             Atlanta Braves                       Port St. Lucie               1:10 p.m.

Tue., March 11           St. Louis Cardinals                 Jupiter                          1:05 p.m.

Fri., March 14             Miami Marlins                        Jupiter                           7:05 p.m.

Sat., March 15            Minnesota Twins (SS)           Port St. Lucie                1:10 p.m.

Sun., March 16           St. Louis Cardinals (SS)        Jupiter                           1:05 p.m.

Mon., March 17          Miami Marlins                        Jupiter                           1:05 p.m.

Sat., March 22            Miami Marlins                        Jupiter                           1:05 p.m.

Sun,, March 23           Washington Nationals (SS)   Port St. Lucie                1:10 p.m.

Wed., March 26          Houston Astros                      Kissimmee                    6:05 p.m.

Fri., March 28             Toronto Blue Jays                  Montreal                        7:05 p.m.

Sat., March 29            Toronto Blue Jays                  Montreal                       1:05 p.m.

Oct 19

Mets Sever Ties With Arrested Catcher

It was interesting to see the Mets’ decision to release minor league catcher Alex Luciano Machillando Romero who was arrested for felony shoplifting in July while in Port St. Lucie.

The Mets have had their share of bad characters before, but often kept them on a long leash with multiple opportunities.

Not only did Romero steal the clothes, but punched a store officer and fled police. All in all, some something he’d like to have on the back of his baseball card.

He paid a $568 fine and served 12 days of jail time. He did not play again after the incident.

I wonder what took them so long to make the cut.

Being a professional athlete isn’t a license to behave like a thug. Perhaps he’ll get another chance somewhere else, but the Mets sent a clear message they won’t tolerate such behavior in their organization.

Good for them.