Feb 02

Mets’ D’Arnaud Down To Last Chance

One Met I’m hopeful for this season is catcher Travis d’Arnaud, who has to know he might be down to his last chance at becoming a starter. He hasn’t come close to reaching his potential – both at the plate and behind it – since coming over in the trade (along with Noah Syndergaard) that sent R.A. Dickey to Toronto.

D'ARNAUD:  Needs good year. (ESPN)

D’ARNAUD: Needs good year. (ESPN)

He has scary power when he connects – wasn’t he the guy who dented the home run apple? – but has been largely been inconsistent. But, I’m liking what I’m reading in The New York Post from Port St. Lucie.

D’Arnaud, who avoided arbitration by signing a one-year deal for $1.875 million, has been working hard with new coach Glenn Sherlock, and has come away with a new stance. Last year d’Arnaud wrapped the bat around his head which resulted in a longer and slower swing.

That’s gone now and the bat is on his shoulder pointing straight behind him instead of pointing at the pitcher. Sherlock is also working with d’Arnaud on quickening his throws to second base. Both are essential improvements for d’Arnaud, who hit only four homers with 15 RBI and threw out only 22 percent of potential baserunners.

“He was a huge help,” d’Arnaud told The New York Post about Sherlock. “For the team to bring him in shows they have my back and they want me to get better. So, it’s cool that he’s here.”

General manager Sandy Alderson said in addition to a shoulder injury, d’Arnaud’s confidence at the plate as impacted by his defensive problems:  “I just think there was a general loss of confidence that was reflected in his offense. It was reflected in his defense. I think that’s something that can be restored.”

Most importantly, d’Arnaud says he feels strong, which is important since injuries have limited to 250 games over the past three years. The Mets always believed keeping d’Arnaud on the field has always been the key to his production.

While the early reports have been encouraging, it’s still only February and d’Arnaud’s new stance and revised throwing mechanics haven’t been tested in a game.

The Mets have so many issues and questions going into spring training and d’Arnaud is certainly one of the most important. The Mets still have confidence in d’Arnaud – at least they have more in him than Kevin Plawecki – but after three years of little production, both parties have to realize this might be d’Arnaud’s last chance.

Dec 21

What’s The Oddest Thing You’ve Seen With A Mets Logo?

It has been a slow time for the Mets and will likely continue to be that way until January when the arbitration period begins. I was at the mall this morning. Just browsing. For those who haven’t finished your Christmas shopping and are looking for something for a Mets’ fan, there is no shortage of things you can buy.

mets-logoball-2The first thing I would get if I were shopping for a Mets’ fan is the obvious choice, and that’s tickets. Individual game tickets are available. The next would be a trip to Port St. Lucie for spring training. The chance for autographs is probably the first two weeks. There are no games and you can usually get players entering the facility in the morning and during breaks in the workouts when they are on the back fields.

No guarantees, of course, but after years of watching spring training that’s a decent bet. Once the games start, if the team is on the road, players who didn’t make the trip stay back can usually be had.

After the experience of the seeing the Mets, the gift choices range from the obvious to the outrageous.

There are T-shirts, sweatshirts, jersey tops, jackets and more varieties of caps than you can imagine. I haven’t seen a Mets logo on shoes, but I probably didn’t look hard enough.

Of course, there are books, calendars, and videos. Hopefully, I’ll have a book for you this time next year. I’ve been working on a few ideas and you can bet I’ll give you a taste here.

I’ve seen jewelry, from watches to bracelets to earrings. It would be nice to gift the players championship rings, but those are earned and not given.

Among the more unusual gifts are cooking related. There’s something for grilling where you can flip your burgers and steaks with a spatula with the Mets’ logo. I think there’s even one where you can imprint the logo on pancakes. Of course, there are cups and mugs.

I’ve seen Mets’ ornaments, a Mets Pez dispenser, rugs and blankets, and collars for your dog. I think you can even get a food bowl for your best friend bearing the logo.

This is a little off course, but you can even order a coffin or urn for ashes bearing the Mets’ logo. That’s another story, obviously.

In the interim, pleasant shopping. And, when you’re out in the stores and see something odd bearing the Mets’ logo, give me a shout.

Sep 18

Three Mets’ Storylines: Makeshift Starter Saves Day … Again

When the final chapter of the 2016 Mets is written, it will be about pitching. The central theme will be about those lost and those who stepped into the breach. With Jacob deGrom scratched from Sunday’s start with an elbow injury that will require season-ending surgery, Gabriel Ynoa became the latest to help keep the Mets in the center of the wild-card race.

YNOA: Makes key start. (AP)

YNOA: Makes key start. (AP)

Personally, I was disappointed manager Terry Collins didn’t give Ynoa one more batter, but it worked out for the best and the Mets went on to complete their sweep of the Minnesota Twins, 3-2, to move into the lead wild-card spot, one game ahead of San Francisco and two over the Cardinals.

Ynoa gave up four hits and struck out eight in 4.2 innings, and from there manager Terry Collins turned to his “plethora of pitchers,” to complete the sweep. Five Mets’ relievers limited the Twins to a pair of runs.

While Ynoa was done when the game was decided, his contribution was vital – and worthy of another start with deGrom for the year – he personified the overriding storyline of this season (even more than their average with RISP) of the success of their emergency starters.

With Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler and deGrom lost for the year, Seth Lugo, Logan Verrett, Robert Gsellman, Ynoa and Rafael Montero – all of whom were not in the Opening Day rotation – have combined to give the Mets 25 starts (seven defined as quality) and 10 victories. Another pitcher who was supposed to be out of the rotation in early July – 43-year-old Bartolo Colon – has 14 victories in 30 starts (18 defined as quality).

That’s 24 victories in 55 starts (25 quality), which is the difference between having something to keep playing for this season and thinking about spring training.

“Hey look, somebody else has got to help,” Collins said. “When you are called upon and it’s your chance, make the most of it.”

This issue will undoubtedly be raised again in the Mets’ remaining 13 starts, as Colon is slated to get three more starts, while the Band-Aid of Lugo, Gsellman and Ynoa are anticipated getting seven more.

That was today’s main storyline with Neil Walker‘s future with the team and more injury updates the others.

WALKER WANTS TO RETURN: The Mets are where they are in the playoff hunt in large part because of Walker, who hit .282 with a career-high 23 homers and 55 RBI, before being lost for the season to undergo season-ending back surgery.

Prior to Walker’s injury, GM Sandy Alderson said he’d talk with Walker’s agent about an extension, something which obviously hasn’t happened. Walker’s leverage on the free-agent market was compromised by the surgery. That explained Walker’s interest in returning.

“This is a good fit,” Walker told reporters. “This looks good, but we don’t know what else is out there. We don’t know where teams might be coming from. The free-agent market this year is kind of weak, especially at the infield position, so you never know what good happen.”

INJURY UPDATES:  Evidently, the Mets didn’t learn from their recent experience with deGrom. Why else would Collins say today Matz could come back “with an opportunity to pitch,” at the end of the week?

Matz, who hasn’t pitched in a month because of a shoulder impingement and is coming off a 30-pitch bullpen session Saturday, could pitch Friday

When it comes to Mets’ injury news, I’ll believe it when I see it, which is why I have no faith in what Collins said.

Matz was 9-8 with a 3.40 ERA when he was sidelined. The long-term goal would be to have him a viable option to pitch in a possible postseason.

“We have no plans yet,” Collins said, almost backtracking. “Nothing’s written. Steven Matz’s name certainly will be in the mix,” Collins said. “But Steven, when he gets here, is going to be a guy with a limit in workload that he has. So to get him built up and get him where we want, I am not sure we have the starts available.”So, why

So, why float the idea in the first place?

Meanwhile, Wilmer Flores‘ sore right wrist has kept him out of the lineup since it was injured in a home-plate collision with Braves’ catcher A.J. Pierzynski. Collins took responsibility for the injury saying he should have run for Flores.

Lucas Duda started for the first time since May. He was activated from the DL Saturday after being on the disabled list with a stress fracture in his lower back. … Yoenis Cespedes left the game in the sixth inning after feeling ill. … Walker said he’s feeling better after having surgery on a herniated disk in his neck.

Please follow me on Twitter

Sep 06

The Mets Should Explore Six-Man Rotation For 2017

This won’t be a popular suggestion with the Mets’ starters, but with everybody in the rotation having been shelved at one time or another with an injury – save Bartolo Colon – perhaps it might be time to consider a six-man rotation for 2017.

HARVEY: Maybe he could stay healthy in 6-man rotation. (Getty)

HARVEY: Maybe he could stay healthy in 6-man rotation. (Getty)

None of the young bucks want this, and understandably so because they’ve been raised on the five-man rotation. Change is difficult, but then again one time there was a four-man rotation. This suggestion is prompted by Rafael Montero replacing Jacob deGrom today in Cincinnati, coupled with the report the latter might miss multiple starts.

It also coincides with solid outings from Seth Lugo and Robert Gsellman.

Matt Harvey is done for the year. So is Zack Wheeler, and nobody knows when he’ll pitch again. After all, it’s been two years now. Steven Matz, sidelined with a bone spur and an impingement in his shoulder, will try to throw in Port St. Lucie today, but his return status is basically a hope.

Noah Syndergaard has also been pitching with a bone spur. Matz’s bone spur will require surgery, but it isn’t known what will happen with Syndergaard.

Meanwhile, deGrom missed time early with a strained lat muscle. His velocity has dipped and after three horrible starts, he has gone from manager Terry Collins not knowing he motioned for the trainer to deGrom saying, “I’m fine,” to missing today’s game, to nobody knows.

The Mets’ rotation for the ages won’t happen this year.

Several weeks ago I wrote how the Mets should re-evaluate the handling of their pitchers. I’m calling for it again, but adding the suggestion they go to a six-man rotation.

Years ago pitchers just pitched. But, the times were different. The salaries have skyrocketed, so there’s a greater need to protect these guys. That’s a partial explanation for why the DL is used so often. What has also changed is pitchers used to throw a fastball, curveball and change-up. Today, there are sliders, sinkers, cut fastballs, all which put strain on the arm.

There’s plenty to share responsibility for Harvey being lost twice, including the player, who wasn’t always upfront. I admire his grit, but we don’t need any heroes. I don’t know if he’ll ever learn, so this might protect him for his own good.

A six-man rotation could save the starters at least a game a month, which is a savings of roughly six starts a year, or as many a 36 innings. Injuries can occur any time despite the greatest precautions, but this could improve the odds or staying healthy.

There will be the natural attrition, such as free agency, trades and injury. Colon might eventually retire. But, if the idea is to keep these guys healthy and pitching, a first step could be reducing the workload.

Some team was the pioneer going from a four-man to a five-man rotation. The Mets have the depth other teams don’t, so why can’t they be the pioneer going to six?

To make this work, it must be installed in spring training with a defined rotation. There can be no deviation, as it will throw off the rest.

If it keeps them off the disabled list, then why not? It’s better than what’s happening now.

ON DECK: Looking at tonight’s starter, Montero.

Please follow me on Twitter

Aug 16

Three Mets’ Storylines: Colon Rocked Hard

Bartolo Colon usually gives the Mets a chance to win. Not so Monday night in Arizona, when thanks to an error by third baseman T.J. Rivera to start the game, the Mets fell into a three-run hole they could not climb out of.

The Diamondbacks had four hits in the inning, all of them scorched.

COLON: Not his night. (AP)

COLON: Not his night. (AP)

Colon had given up single runs in his last two starts, but gave up five runs on nine hits and two walks over four innings in a 10-6 loss.

The Mets picked away at a six-run deficit, but it was just one of those nights where there seemed little doubt as to the outcome.

The only bright spots for the Mets were Travis d’Arnaud getting three hits, a homer by Neil Walker, and are you ready for this? Colon drew the first walk of his career in his 282nd plate appearance.

It was a bad night all around as the Nationals and Marlins both won.

The other main storylines pertaining to the Mets today was what would they do when Yoenis Cespedes comes off the disabled list and several injury updates.

PLAN FOR CESPEDES’ RETURN: The Mets signed Cespedes to play center field, but he’ll play left when he comes off the disabled list Friday in San Francisco. The Mets procrastinated for nearly a month before placing him on the disabled list, and although I’m not crazy about him calling the shots, it’s prudent to preserve him as much as possible.

However, if he can’t run or is limited defensively, then they should leave him on the disabled list and bring up Michael Conforto to play left.

Cespedes began a rehab assignment today in Port St. Lucie and went 0-for-3.

INJURY UPDATES: Zack Wheeler will be examined Wednesday by Dr. James Andrews. A negative exam could necessitate another Tommy John surgery. … Shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera will begin a rehab assignment Tuesday in Port St. Lucie. He’s expected to be activated Saturday. … Pitcher Logan Verrett is trying to get his demotion to Triple-A rescinded into a DL appointment. Verrett says he has a stiff neck. A MRI showed nothing significant. Walker update: Walker could leave the team Tuesday on paternity leave. He could be away for up to three days.

EXTRA INNINGS: Reports say the Mets aren’t interested in trading for Houston outfielder Carlos Gomez, who was designated for assignment. … There is also no interest in reliever Jonathan Papelbon, who was released by Washington. … The Mets announced their season-ticket prices would rise by 3.95 percent next year. … Original Met catcher Choo Choo Coleman died Monday three days shy of his 81st birthday. … Monday’s lineup featured five position players who were either not in the Opening Day lineup or on the roster.