Mar 12

Lannan Sharp In Loss To Cardinals

Lefty John Lannan scored points again today in his effort to land a role with the New York Mets. Signed to compete for the fifth-starter job, Lannan could make the Opening Day roster out of the bullpen.

Lannan gave up two unearned runs in four innings, but retired his last eight hitters in a 6-4 loss to St. Louis.

Lannan struck out five, but perhaps more importantly, got nine ground-ball outs. What’s next for Lannan, he doesn’t know, but sounded as if he’ll start again.

“The possibility of [relieving] has been brought up to me, just in conversation,’’ Lannan told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “I started today, and I’m going to act as if I’m starting five days from now, until I’m told otherwise.’’

The Mets are projected to carry seven relievers, but currently Scott Rice would be the only left-hander unless Lannan makes the roster.

ON DECK: Mets Wrap.

Mar 07

Mets’ Lineup, March 7

Daisuke Matsuzaka makes his second exhibition start today against St. Louis at Port St. Lucie. Today marks the first appearances of this spring by Daniel Murphy and David Wright. Major League Baseball continues its instant replay experiment.

Here’s today’s Mets’ lineup:

Eric Young, lf

Daniel Murphy, 2b

David Wright, 3b

Curtis Granderson, rf

Chris Young, cf

Josh Satin, 1b

Travis d’Arnaud, c

Kirk Nieuwenhuis, dh

Ruben Tejada, ss

LINEUP COMMENTS: The top four could be the Opening Day order. … Still waiting to see Wilmer Flores start a few more games at shortstop. … The bottom of the order is probably the best spot for Tejada.  

 

Mar 06

Mets’ Ike Davis, Lucas Duda Still Hurting

Recovery for New York Mets first basemen Ike Davis and Lucas Duda from leg injuries remain slow, with neither expected to play soon.

DAVIS: Still ailing. (AP)

DAVIS: Still ailing. (AP)

Davis hit against live pitching in an intrasquad game today, but did no running. He is dealing with tightness in both calves and said the prognosis of playing tomorrow is premature.

“The good thing is it doesn’t hurt to swing, so I can get at-bats and stuff like that,’’ Davis told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “I’ve just got to wait a little bit longer for running, so the point in my calves to the touch don’t hurt anymore.

“It’s both calves. My left one is better than my right. My right one is a little bit worse. But it’s getting better every day. Today it felt better than it did yesterday. `So hopefully in the next couple of days I’ll be able to start running. I’m trying to get as many at-bats so I don’t miss that part of it – like today. And then obviously as soon as I’m able to play, I’ll be playing a bunch.’’

Davis, who hit .205 with only nine homers last season, believes the injuries originated while lifting weights.

Davis believes it his better to miss time now than aggravate the injury further and miss more time.

As for Duda, also solid from the weight room, said he has soreness in the bottom of his left hamstring.

Duda said he’s feeling better every day, but isn’t ready to test it in a game.

ON DECK: Mets wrap

Feb 28

Jon Niese Injury Raises Questions

It was interesting to hear Jonathon Niese take responsibility for his setback, but his comments raised questions as to how the New York Mets handled his injury.

NIESE: Injury raises questions. (AP)

NIESE: Injury raises questions. (AP)

Niese’s MRI revealed scapula-muscle weakness in the back of his left shoulder.

How did this happen?

Niese missed two months last season with a rotator-cuff strain, but returned to pitch late in the year.

Before the offseason, I asked Niese his off-season plans and he said he would get a workout routine from the trainers and concentrate on strengthening his shoulder. Sounded reasonable.

Today, Niese told ESPN in Port St. Lucie he worked on the rotator cuff area, but neglected the area in the back part of the shoulder leading to an imbalance of strength and caused his shoulder blade to be tugged at an awkward angle.

Often with an arm injury a pitcher overcompensates, which leads to another problem.

“The MRI revealed that my shoulder this year is actually better than it was last year,’’ Niese said. “[Mets physician Dr. David Altchek] said everything was healed and everything was clean.

“It’s just the fact that there are little weak spots. I kind of blame that on myself. Last year, with it being the rotator cuff, this off-season that’s pretty much all I was working on. I neglected the other things. So everything was at an imbalance. That’s when I started having the shoulder-pinching issues and discomfort.’’

This leads to several questions:

* Was Niese instructed to work on that area of the shoulder and just didn’t? If so, why? Surely, he has to be smart enough not to ignore rehab instructions.

* Did the doctors not tell and show Niese how to work those muscles? One would think they would have.

* Was Niese rushed back too soon last season and developed bad habits that carried over to his off-season throwing? If so, it wouldn’t have been the first time a Met was rushed back.

* Are Niese’s mechanics the same as they were prior to the injury, and if so, why wasn’t this caught by pitching coach Dan Warthen? Everything is on tape, so it’s a wonder why it was missed if that’s the case.

* Niese said he would get a workout routine from a physical therapist, leading to speculation he wasn’t given that series of exercises. If so, why not?

The Mets have been frequently criticized for their handling of injuries. While it might be premature to make that accusation in this case, there is cause to wonder.

Feb 27

Syndergaard Stars In Intrasquad Game; Mets Shouldn’t Get Carried Away

The cheers were great, the performance was scintillating, but the New York Mets – and their often-frustrated fan base – shouldn’t get carried away and read too much into Noah Syndergaard’s performance in Thursday’s intrasquad game.

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

In Syndergaard’s first performance in the Mets’ camp, Syndergaard, throwing what manager Terry Collins calls “the hook from hell,’’ struck out five in two innings. He also gave up a run on four hits, but with no walks.

Not only was Syndergaard’s curveball working in fall-off-the-table fashion, but his 97 mph., fastball was sizzling.

“I felt pretty good out there. I kind of shocked myself a little bit,’’ Syndergaard told reporters Thursday in Port St. Lucie. “I wasn’t expecting that my first time out there.’’

Nor should the Mets expect that from him in Monday’s start against Atlanta; every time out at Triple-A Las Vegas; or when he finally is brought up in June. He’ll need time to develop into all what is expected of him.

“I didn’t think I was going to get the start, first of all,” Syndergaard said of Monday. “I’m excited, a little nervous at the same time. It’s the first time facing a real big-league lineup. I’m going to go out there and do what I can. It’s still a game. They’re still playing baseball out there.’’

Which is true, but baseball is also a game of emotions. Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler, despite their youth, have been able to keep their emotions in check. The Mets would like to see the same from Syndergaard.

That will be easier, of course, if he’s throwing that fastball in the upper 90s.

“How can you not like what you saw?’’ Collins said. “For heaven’s sake, I don’t know how hard he threw, but it was firm. Even in a game like this, you better get to the heater, because you don’t want to try to hit that curveball.

“Certainly everything you heard, you saw. You heard, ‘What a great arm.’ You got it. You heard, ‘He’s got a great presence,’ that he pounds the strike zone. He did that.’’

Of course, should Syndergaard cut down the Braves as he did his minor league teammates, there will be rumblings about cracking the rotation.

However, Collins and general manager Sandy Alderson should a turn a deaf ear and continue with the same plan they had last season for Wheeler.

ON DECK: Mets Wrap.