Sep 15

Mr Met: Entertaining and Delighting Fans Since 1963

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Tell the unknowing that a guy with a giant baseball head, cartoonish nose, and goofy wide smile is one of the most beloved characters in sports history and you’re bound to get a reaction of disbelief.

But such a claim holds true for Mr. Met, the long time mascot of the New York Mets.

The simple truth is that Mr. Met is sure to make you smile whether you’re a diehard Mets fan, a casual fan, or are just human with a charitable nature.

As an early pioneer of team mascots, the humble beginnings of the Mr. Met character date back a full decade or more before most MLB teams adopted costumed characters to amuse fans.  While it’s quite expected these days to see mascots engaging with fans at the ballpark, they all owe a debt to the groundbreaking Mr. Met.

He originally existed in animated form when he graced the cover of the Mets programs, scorecards, and yearbooks during the 1963 season.  Several artists, including acclaimed comic book illustrator Al Avison, contributed to the concept and design of Mr. Met.

The team moved stadiums from the Polo Grounds to Shea Stadium in 1964, an occasion enhanced by the debut of Mr. Met as a live mascot.

Mr. Met graced Mets games and promotional material until 1976, when he was phased out of appearance.  Presumably, he retired and was playing golf in Florida, although this has never been confirmed.

Passionate fan appeal sparked the Mets to reintroduce Mr. Met in 1994, and he has been rightfully entertaining the masses at Shea Stadium and Citi Field ever since.

In addition to being a fixture at the ballpark on his own, Mr. Met is a devoted husband, occasionally bringing his lovely wife Mrs. Met along to the games.

Mr. Met’s unwavering support for the Amazin’s through thick and thin is an inspiration to every fan, especially in down seasons like the current. The crosstown fans might peruse the lines on BetStars any given day and see the Yankees as 4/6 favorites over the Twins.  As the Mets faithful, we haven’t had that luxury often in 2017.

So while he has always worn the hat of his favorite baseball team, Mr. Met has worn many figurative hats throughout his career.  Off the field, he has been a cheerleader, a fundraiser, a marketer, and even a hired wedding guest.

Of course, Mr. Met is a man of giving back to communities.  He has appeared at numerous charity events over the years.  Everywhere Mr. Met goes he’s met with smiles and hugs, and the inevitable questions about his baseball head and toothless grin.

Beyond his role as the stellar ambassador of the Mets organization, Mr. Met is a savvy advertiser for anyone who will call him up for a commercial.  He has appeared in several spots for ESPN in their fan favorite This is SportsCenter ad campaign, as well lending his red stitched face to Sony PlayStation and MTA New York City Transit.

Mr. Met played himself in a 2016 episode of the CBS sitcom The Odd Couple.  Not that he could possibly be anyone else.

A noteworthy career of entertaining and delighting fans across the world doesn’t go unrecognized.  The Mascot Hall of Fame inducted Mr. Met in 2007, where he joined the Phillie Phantic of the Philadelphia Phillies to became only the second MLB mascot honored by the organization.  In 2012, Forbes magazine heralded Mr. Met as number one on a list of America’s favorite sports mascots.

Mr. Met has enlivened Mets fans and beyond for more than 50 years. In that time, multiple generations have grown up enjoying his jovial personality and zany antics at the ballpark.  We tip our caps to you, Mr. Met.  May you keep us young at heart for another 50 years.

Apr 16

Today In Mets’ History: Shea Stadium Christened

It was all ceremony for the Mets on this day in 1964 when Bill Shea, credited for bringing National League baseball back to New York, christened Shea Stadium.

Shea poured bottles of Holy Water from the Gowanus Canal, which passes near the former sited of Ebbets Field, home of the Dodgers, and the Harlem River, which passes in front of the former sithyof the Polo Grounds, home of the Giants. The Mets also played in the Polo Grounds in the first two years of their existence.

The Mets always honored their combined Dodgers-Giants heritages beginning with their team jersey colors of Dodger blue and Giant orange. Those colors were also incorporated at Shea Stadium with blue outfield walls – most teams used black or green – and the only team in the majors to have orange foul poles.

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Apr 13

Today In Mets’ History: Lose First Home Opener

National League baseball returned to New York on this date in 1962 in front of 12,447 freezing fans on a blustery day at the Polo Grounds. The Mets lost 4-3 to Pittsburgh.

Can you believe it? The Mets only drew 12,447 people in the first home in their history.

Frank Thomas hit the first home homer. Pitcher Sherman Jones – who took the loss – had the first home hit in franchise history.

The opened the first season two days earlier with an 11-4 loss in St. Louis.

The Mets would lose their first nine games before their first victory in franchise history at Pittsburgh. They would finish April at 3-13, 9.5 games out of first place.

The Mets finished in last place that season with a 40-120 record, only 60.5 games behind the San Francisco Giants.

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Apr 13

Today In Mets History: NL Baseball Returns To New York

On this date in 1962, National League baseball returned to New York after a four-year absence in a 4-3 loss to Pittsburgh in their home opener in the Polo Grounds.

Surprisingly, only 12,447 showed up for the first National League game in the city since the Dodgers and Giants bolted for California for the start of the 1958 season.

Pitcher Sherman Jones took the loss for the Mets and Frank Thomas homered.

Thomas hit 34 homers with 94 RBI in 1962. He hit 52 homers in three homers for the Mets. Sherman was 0-4 with a 7.71 ERA in eight games for the Mets in 1962, his only season with the team and his last year in the major leagues.

BOX SCORE

 

Feb 17

Today In Mets History: Roger Craig Born

One of original Mets, pitcher Roger Craig, was born in Durham, N.C., on this date in 1930.

CRAIG: Happy Birthday to an original Met.

CRAIG: Happy Birthday to an original Met.

Craig was signed by Brooklyn in 1950 and broke in with the Dodgers five years later. He accompanied the team to Los Angeles and spent four years there before being selected in the expansion draft by the Mets prior to the 1962 season and pitched two years in the Polo Grounds and compiled a 15-46 record with a 4.14 ERA.

He became the answer to a trivia question when he started and lost the first game in Mets’ history.

Craig left the Mets following the 1963 season and went on to pitch with St. Louis, Cincinnati and Philadelphia and retired after 1966 with a 74-98 record, .430 ERA and 1.334 WHIP.

After he retired, Craig went on to manage San Francisco from 1986-1990, however his real niche was as a pitching coach where he taught the split-finger fastball.

Box Score: Craig’s first game as a Met.